Description

No monument better expressed the ambitions of King Charles V of France (r. 1364-80) than the Louvre. Charles V’s renovated Louvre asserted his legitimacy, served as a temple of wisdom,

No monument better expressed the ambitions of King Charles V of France (r. 1364-80) than the Louvre. Charles V’s renovated Louvre asserted his legitimacy, served as a temple of wisdom, and was a majestic sign of the renewed presence of the monarch after years of royal absence. This article examines how Charles V’s Louvre created meaning through its association with its site, with other monuments, and with texts and images to become a political manifesto in stone.

application/pdf

Download count: 0

Details

Contributors
Date Created
  • 2013-11-30
Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1353/esp.2014.0021
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0014-0767
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1931-0234

    Citation and reuse

    Cite this item

    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Cruse, Mark (2014). The Louvre of Charles V: Legitimacy, Renewal, and Royal Presence in Fourteenth-Century Paris. ESPRIT CREATEUR, 54(2), 19-32. http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/lesprit_createur/v054/54.2.cruse.html

    Machine-readable links