Description

Theories about Third Space or “in-betweeness” often lack an ethics that responds to the position of the majority of people who experience the violence of colonialism, as Amar Acheraïou argues.

Theories about Third Space or “in-betweeness” often lack an ethics that responds to the position of the majority of people who experience the violence of colonialism, as Amar Acheraïou argues. How can we think about hybridity with a more committed ethics? Hari Kunzru’s The Impressionist suggests that much of the violence experienced by humans and animals under dominant or colonial thought stems from a traditional view of subjectivity as fixed, stable, knowable, distinct, and independent from others and the material world.

application/pdf

Download count: 0

Details

Contributors
Date Created
  • 2014-01-01
Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1353/ari.2014.0000
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0004-1327
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1920-1222

    Citation and reuse

    Cite this item

    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Price, Jason D. (2014). Resisting Colonial Mastery: Becoming Animal, Becoming Ethical in The Impressionist. ARIEL-A REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH LITERATURE, 45(1), 1-34. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ari.2014.0000

    Machine-readable links