Description

This paper traces the history of mortgage law in the United States. I explore the history of foreclosure procedures, redemption periods, restrictions on deficiency judgments, and foreclosure moratoria. The historical

This paper traces the history of mortgage law in the United States. I explore the history of foreclosure procedures, redemption periods, restrictions on deficiency judgments, and foreclosure moratoria. The historical record shows that the most enduring aspects of mortgage law stem from case law rather than statute. In particular, the ability of creditors to foreclose nonjudicially is determined very early in states’ histories, usually before the Civil War, and usually in case law. In contrast, the aspects of mortgage law developed through statute change more frequently.

application/pdf

Download count: 0

Details

Contributors
Date Created
  • 2014-11-01
Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1086/680931
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0022-2186
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1537-5285
    Note

    Citation and reuse

    Cite this item

    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Ghent, Andra (2014). How Do Case Law and Statute Differ? Lessons from the Evolution of Mortgage Law. JOURNAL OF LAW & ECONOMICS, 57(4), 1085-1122. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/680931

    Machine-readable links