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At least 50 indigenous groups spread across lowland South America remain isolated and have only intermittent and mostly hostile interactions with the outside world. Except in emergency situations, the current

At least 50 indigenous groups spread across lowland South America remain isolated and have only intermittent and mostly hostile interactions with the outside world. Except in emergency situations, the current policy of governments in Brazil, Colombia, and Peru towards isolated tribes is a “leave them alone” strategy, in which isolated groups are left uncontacted.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-03-08
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150987
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560

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    Walker, R. S., Kesler, D. C., & Hill, K. R. (2016). Are Isolated Indigenous Populations Headed toward Extinction? Plos One, 11(3). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0150987

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