Description

Background
Urbanization can strongly impact the physiology, behavior, and fitness of animals. Conditions in cities may also promote the transmission and success of animal parasites and pathogens. However, to date,

Background
Urbanization can strongly impact the physiology, behavior, and fitness of animals. Conditions in cities may also promote the transmission and success of animal parasites and pathogens. However, to date, no studies have examined variation in the prevalence or severity of several distinct pathogens/parasites along a gradient of urbanization in animals or if these infections increase physiological stress in urban populations.
Methodology/Principal Findings

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    Date Created
    • 2014-02-04
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086747
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560

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    Giraudeau, M., Mousel, M., Earl, S., & Mcgraw, K. (2014). Parasites in the City: Degree of Urbanization Predicts Poxvirus and Coccidian Infections in House Finches (Haemorhous mexicanus). PLoS ONE, 9(2). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0086747

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