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Although vocal production in non-human primates is highly constrained, individuals appear to have some control over whether to call or remain silent. We investigated how contextual factors affect the production

Although vocal production in non-human primates is highly constrained, individuals appear to have some control over whether to call or remain silent. We investigated how contextual factors affect the production of grunts given by wild female chacma baboons, Papio ursinus, during social interactions. Females grunted as they approached other adult females 28% of the time. Supporting previous research, females were much more likely to grunt to mothers with young infants than to females without infants.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-10-26
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0163978
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560

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    Silk, J. B., Seyfarth, R. M., & Cheney, D. L. (2016). Strategic Use of Affiliative Vocalizations by Wild Female Baboons. Plos One, 11(10). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0163978

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