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In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (AT[subscript max])

In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (AT[subscript max]) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥65 during the months May–October for years 2000–2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat.

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    Date Created
    • 2014-03-20
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3390/ijerph110303304
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1660-4601

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    Harlan, S., Chowell, G., Yang, S., Petitti, D., Butler, E. M., Ruddell, B., & Ruddell, D. (2014). Heat-Related Deaths in Hot Cities: Estimates of Human Tolerance to High Temperature Thresholds. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11(3), 3304-3326. doi:10.3390/ijerph110303304

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