Description

Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains

Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains unclear. One reason why parents may react protectively towards their child’s pain is that they perceive their child to be unable to cope or function normally while in pain (perceived low self-efficacy).

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    Date Created
    • 2016-09-19
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3390/children3030015
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2227-9067

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    Dupen, M., Tilburg, M. V., Langer, S., Murphy, T., Romano, J., & Levy, R. (2016). Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder. Children, 3(3), 15. doi:10.3390/children3030015

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