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In many social mammals, females who form close, differentiated bonds with others experience greater offspring survival and longevity. We still know little, however, about how females' relationships are structured within

In many social mammals, females who form close, differentiated bonds with others experience greater offspring survival and longevity. We still know little, however, about how females' relationships are structured within the social group, or whether connections beyond the level of the dyad have any adaptive value. Here, we apply social network analysis to wild baboons in order to evaluate the comparative benefits of dyadic bonds against several network measures.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-07-27
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1098/rsos.160255
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2054-5703
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    Cheney, D. L., Silk, J. B., & Seyfarth, R. M. (2016). Network connections, dyadic bonds and fitness in wild female baboons. Royal Society Open Science, 3(7), 160255. doi:10.1098/rsos.160255

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