Description

The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction

The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated.

Reuse Permissions
  • application/pdf

    Download count: 0

    Details

    Date Created
    • 2014-09-30
    Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3402/ijch.v73.25163
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1239-9736
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2242-3982
    Note

    Citation and reuse

    Cite this item

    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Parkinson, A. J., Evengard, B., Semenza, J. C., Ogden, N., Børresen, M. L., Berner, J., . . . Albihn, A. (2014). Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic: establishment of a circumpolar working group. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 73(1), 25163. doi:10.3402/ijch.v73.25163

    Machine-readable links