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People with independent (vs. interdependent) social orientation place greater priority on personal success, autonomy, and novel experiences over maintaining ties to their communities of origin. Accordingly, an independent orientation should

People with independent (vs. interdependent) social orientation place greater priority on personal success, autonomy, and novel experiences over maintaining ties to their communities of origin. Accordingly, an independent orientation should be linked to a motivational proclivity to move to places that offer economic opportunities, freedom, and diversity. Such places are cities that can be called “cosmopolitan.” In support of this hypothesis, Study 1 found that independently oriented young adults showed a preference to move to cosmopolitan rather than noncosmopolitan cities.

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    Date Created
    • 2015-10-14
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01459
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1664-1078

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    Sevincer, A. T., Kitayama, S., & Varnum, M. E. (2015). Cosmopolitan cities: the frontier in the twenty-first century? Frontiers in Psychology, 6. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01459

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