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At the end of the dark ages, anatomy was taught as though everything that could be known was known. Scholars learned about what had been discovered rather than how to

At the end of the dark ages, anatomy was taught as though everything that could be known was known. Scholars learned about what had been discovered rather than how to make discoveries. This was true even though the body (and the rest of biology) was very poorly understood. The renaissance eventually brought a revolution in how scholars (and graduate students) were trained and worked.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-03-01
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1049
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1935-7877
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1935-7885
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    Dunn, R. R., Cooper, C. B., Cavelier, D., & Urban, J. (2016). The Tragedy of the Unexamined Cat: Why K–12 and University Education Are Still in the Dark Ages and How Citizen Science Allows for a Renaissance. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, 17(1), 4-6. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v17i1.1049

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