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A growing body of literature on the commons has provided fascinating and intricate insights on how some local institutions have successfully managed to avoid a seemingly inevitable “tragedy of the

A growing body of literature on the commons has provided fascinating and intricate insights on how some local institutions have successfully managed to avoid a seemingly inevitable “tragedy of the commons” once popularized by Garrett Hardin. Primarily benefitting from the recent studies on the commonpool resources conducted by Elinor Ostrom and colleagues, polycentric selforganization and autonomy, rather than the direct state or market control over the commons, are often recognized as key features of the long enduring commons.

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    Date Created
    • 2015-09-18
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.18352/ijc.561
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1875-0281
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    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Chaudhary, P., Chhetri, N. B., Dorman, B., Gegg, T., Rana, R. B., Shrestha, M., . . . Thapa, S. (2015). Turning conflict into collaboration in managing commons: A case of Rupa Lake Watershed, Nepal. International Journal of the Commons, 9(2), 744. doi:10.18352/ijc.561

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