Matching Items (17)

128098-Thumbnail Image.png

The Impact of Acculturation on Informal and Formal Volunteering of Korean Americans in the United States

Description

This study examines the impact of acculturation on Korean Americans’ decisions to volunteer either for secular and religious organizations or informally. The results show that language difficulty and Korean identity

This study examines the impact of acculturation on Korean Americans’ decisions to volunteer either for secular and religious organizations or informally. The results show that language difficulty and Korean identity lower the likelihood of secular volunteering, but not of informal volunteering. Koreans who are Protestants or Catholics, and those with higher levels of education, are more likely to volunteer formally, but not informally. The findings indicate formal volunteering is strongly associated with acculturation factors, along with personal and social variables but informal volunteering appears to be independent from and not complementary of the other two types of volunteering.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

134690-Thumbnail Image.png

Non-Profit Project Evaluation: Kabanana Community School

Description

It is essential for nonprofit organizations to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of their programs on their target communities to demonstrate their value and progress to current and prospective stakeholders.

It is essential for nonprofit organizations to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of their programs on their target communities to demonstrate their value and progress to current and prospective stakeholders. Unfortunately, due to finite resources, projects developed and conducted by small international non-governmental organizations (INGO's) are unable to conduct regular evaluations. In this study, I will be conducting an evaluation of a community school project completed by an INGO in order to gauge the project's impact in the community. The evaluation includes a review of previously published literature on the subject, as well as survey data that was gathered to gauge the project's impact. The results of this study found not only that the community school students were beating both the district and national average in examination scores, but also that 100% of students in attendance planned on completing some form of higher education. Furthermore, a majority of the enrolled students would not have had access to alternate forms of education without the community school. For these reasons, the project appears to be meeting all of its current objectives. The evaluation produced several strong recommendations for the school's future improvement such as continuous benchmarking and self-evaluation, increased focus on shifting towards self-sustainability, and an overall improvement of its current facilities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

131738-Thumbnail Image.png

Undergraduate Student Governments at Arizona State University: An Analysis of Student Participation

Description

With a fresh democratic energy emerging from newer generations, there is an increasing
number of youth becoming politically active and civically engaged. Many of whom are active
and

With a fresh democratic energy emerging from newer generations, there is an increasing
number of youth becoming politically active and civically engaged. Many of whom are active
and engaged are college students, seeking change not only within politics and society, but within
their institution. At Arizona State University (ASU), the institution is spread across four unique
campuses in which each of the campuses holds its own undergraduate student government.
Within the Associated Students of Arizona State University (ASASU), each Undergraduate
Student Government (USG) experiences low voter turnout every year in their elections and high
turnover rates. Understanding why students chose to be involved in the first place is a major
question.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

133375-Thumbnail Image.png

Youth Engagement in the Town of Guadalupe

Description

The town of Guadalupe, Arizona has a long history of divided residents and high poverty rates. The high levels of poverty in the town can be attributed to numerous factors,

The town of Guadalupe, Arizona has a long history of divided residents and high poverty rates. The high levels of poverty in the town can be attributed to numerous factors, most notably high rates of drug abuse, low high school graduation rates, and teen pregnancy. The town has named one of its most pressing issues of today to be youth disengagement. There are currently a handful of residents and community members passionate about finding a solution to this issue. After working with Guadalupe's Ending Hunger Task Force and resident youth, I set out to create a program design for a Guadalupe Youth Council. This council will contribute to combating youth disengagement. The program design will assist the task force in creating a standing youth council and deciding on the structure and role the council has in the town. I will offer learning outcomes and suggestions to the Task Force, youth council staff, and the youth of the youth council. This study contains an analysis of relevant literature, youth focus group results and data, and how the information gathered has contributed to the design of the youth council. The results of this study contain recommendations about four themes within the program design of a youth council: size, recruitment, activities and engagement, and adult support. The results also explore how the youth council will impact the power, policy, and behavior of Guadalupe youth.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133264-Thumbnail Image.png

Volunteer Meraki: Nonprofit Market Research, Cultural Program and Project Launch

Description

This thesis describes various steps in creation of Volunteer Meraki, an international volunteer organization. Continuing from the past findings from Nicholas Pfeiffer and Hunter Workman (Pfeiffer and Workman, 2016), a

This thesis describes various steps in creation of Volunteer Meraki, an international volunteer organization. Continuing from the past findings from Nicholas Pfeiffer and Hunter Workman (Pfeiffer and Workman, 2016), a new study was held to examine the interest of students of Arizona State University in volunteering internationally and becoming involved with Volunteer Meraki as well as to investigate perceived successes and weaknesses of other nonprofit organizations focused on international volunteering. These findings of this studiesy guided guides the creation of the organization, the marketing plan, and the program design of Volunteer Meraki. The market research component of this program serves to help us decide the desirability of creating an ASU club, as well as helps us shape our organization to accommodate volunteers. Students were asked for their experience and interest in volunteering and clubs. The results of this study supported suggest the benefits of an ASU club, and inform on the major concerns volunteers have with volunteer projects and organizations. These results are addressed in Volunteer Meraki's marketing plan, internal functions plan and international volunteer program design. With findings on interests and barriers that students had in relation to international volunteering, Volunteer Meraki has been structured to address the concerns with organization administration, culturally competent programs, and contextually relevant impact on community development. With the guiding principles of mindfulness, sustainability, and integrity, Volunteer Meraki serves as an organization dedicated to building sustainable and successful partnerships that address the needs of marginalized and impoverished communities through mindful and culturally sensitive volunteer engagement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

137745-Thumbnail Image.png

Analysis and Promotion of Short-term Medical Volunteer Work: A Study of an NGO in Central America

Description

Short-term medical volunteer work via a nongovernmental organization is a popular tool for students in the health care field to gain experience, while further providing communities that normally lack health

Short-term medical volunteer work via a nongovernmental organization is a popular tool for students in the health care field to gain experience, while further providing communities that normally lack health care options the opportunity to receive free care. One such organization, VIDA Volunteer Travel, has been successful in implementing this model in Central America. However, organizations of this form have not been evaluated for effectiveness or improvement. This exploratory study examines the effectiveness of VIDA based on six qualifying characteristics that make up a successful NGO. The researcher conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 21 individuals, including VIDA staff members in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, health professionals working for VIDA, local community leaders, and volunteers participating in VIDA's programs. Summaries and quotes of these interviews were uploaded and analysed using Atlas.ti to identify common words and themes from the interviews. Informants frequently identified the organization as sustainable, both from a fiscal and ecological standpoint. The organization also successfully managed volunteers, although post-trip follow-up was lacking. Adherence to the mission statement and distribution of supplies allowed for improved organization and successful structure of the organization. Education and health promotion was also emphasized, although implementation of this education into the communities was lacking. Collaboration with the community and volunteers allowed for stringent, successful treatment to be given to patients, and ethical guidelines set up by the organization allowed for self-governance and improvement of the NGO. This study suggests future research opportunities for the organization, to evaluate its own impact and opportunities for improvement. Furthermore, suggestions are addressed that allow the organization to improve upon its well-implemented infrastructure, and allow for future organizations to use VIDA as a model for improvement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

132999-Thumbnail Image.png

The Motivations of College Students to Volunteer in Local Nonprofit Hospitals

Description

The purpose of this study is to assess the factors that motivate and influence 18-24-year-olds, compared to those of other age groups, to volunteer, specifically in local hospitals. Volunteers play

The purpose of this study is to assess the factors that motivate and influence 18-24-year-olds, compared to those of other age groups, to volunteer, specifically in local hospitals. Volunteers play an integral role towards sustaining nonprofit organizations (NPOs). For this reason, volunteers have the potential to impact the success and effectiveness of local NPOs including nonprofit hospitals such as Banner Health, Mayo Clinic, and HonorHealth. These hospitals rely on the services provided by volunteers to help facilitate their patient care and achieve their missions. An important component of the hospitals’ volunteer programs must focus on the recruitment and retention of volunteers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, volunteer rates are lowest among 20-24-year-olds. Since most college students encompass the 18-24 age range, understanding the factors that motivate and influence them could indicate why there is a low number of hospital volunteers in this age group. ASU students were surveyed regarding their volunteer history, volunteer motivations, and volunteer constraints. Their responses were compared to survey results from local hospital volunteers to look for significant differences or similarities which are highlighted in this study. A total of 183 ASU students between the ages of 18 and 24 completed the survey, and 58 of those students identified as a prior or current hospital volunteer. Three ASU students participated in a focus group. Out of the five Arizona nonprofit hospitals contacted, only one participated in the study. Banner Thunderbird Medical Center (BTMC) had 34 active hospital volunteers complete the survey. The BTMC volunteers who participated in the study were between 14 and 83 years old with the most common age being 69 years old.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

135473-Thumbnail Image.png

A NEW REALM OF SUPPORT: INSPIRING COLLEGE-AGE, WESTERN TRAVELERS TO ENGAGE IN SHORT-TERM SERVICE

Description

Research has examined the many motivations of international volunteers (voluntourists), but there is limited research about how volunteers are reached, as well as differing perceptions between travelers who have and

Research has examined the many motivations of international volunteers (voluntourists), but there is limited research about how volunteers are reached, as well as differing perceptions between travelers who have and have not traveled before. This study examines the preferences and perspectives of college-age, western backpackers. The general terms "backpacker" and "traveler" are used throughout the paper for simplicity, but it is important to note that these backpackers are specifically from the college-age, western demographic. First, the study addresses which recruitment avenues are the most successful, as well as which avenues could be utilized to increase the number of foreign, short-term volunteers. In addition, this study examines the differences between backpacker perceptions - specifically the differences in potential volunteering motivations and concerns. Data was collected through an anonymous online survey distributed to self-identified travelers between the ages of 18 and 25 in the United States and travel destinations in Vietnam and India. According to traveler responses, personal recommendations and hotels/hostels are important resources when making travel plans. Despite the importance of both resources, personal recommendations drew more travelers to volunteer than hostels/hotels (none of the travelers surveyed learned about their last volunteer opportunity through a hostel), revealing a potential avenue of recruitment. A small number of organizations have reported successfully utilizing the hostel-partnership model, which implies that successful partnerships are possible. Further, potential motivations to volunteer were similar between those who have and those who have not volunteered, however, potential concerns between the two groups differed. Those who had volunteered before reported to be considerably more concerned about adherence to cultural norms, as well as communication barriers, while those who had not volunteered were much more concerned about safety. These findings lead to several theoretical implications for nonprofits with respect to utilizing hostels for volunteer recruitment, as well as addressing concerns of those who have volunteered before differently from those who have not.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

136279-Thumbnail Image.png

The College Decision in Rural Arizona: How Can Educators Help?

Description

There are many factors that influence the college decision process, but rural students face a unique set of challenges because of the environment in which they make the decision. This

There are many factors that influence the college decision process, but rural students face a unique set of challenges because of the environment in which they make the decision. This is a qualitative study that combines a review of previous literature on the subject with a survey of twelve students from the graduating class of 2011 in a rural area of Arizona. Results from the interviews found that the rural students consider the perception of importance of a college degree, parental influence, and self-discovery as important factors in the decision making process. In addition, not all non-college-going students felt that college was necessary for a better quality of living, but did express desire for more development opportunities while in high school. The findings resulted in the following recommendations for local educators to help students better navigate the college decision process: teach parents how to have more meaningful conversations, provide step-by-step assistance to students about the college application process, and provide more opportunities for self/educational/career development to students.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

Understanding Volunteer Motivations and Incentives for Retention in the Nonprofit Sector: Delivering Health and Hope to the World, One Super Sort at a Time

Description

Project C.U.R.E. is a nonprofit organization that delivers donated medical supplies and services to developing nations across the world. Currently, the Phoenix location has three full time employees, so a

Project C.U.R.E. is a nonprofit organization that delivers donated medical supplies and services to developing nations across the world. Currently, the Phoenix location has three full time employees, so a majority of the manual work is completed by episodic and long-term volunteers as well as semesterly interns. Volunteers are the backbone of the organization's daily productivity. Productivity among the Project C.U.R.E. warehouses varies greatly by location and is not directly related to the size of the warehouse. Productivity if hereby defined as as a warehouse's capability to meet the organization's goal of one container per week. Productivity can be increased or decreased based on the number of volunteers, funding, and catalogued inventory. Across all warehouses there is generally an overflow of donated equipment and consumable products, and therefore this is not usually a factor in productivity. In order to better understand why the Phoenix warehouse is the second most productive despite being the smallest, we researched how the motivations of volunteers. A survey was conducted to assess the motives of Project C.U.R.E.'s volunteers by quantifying their responses according to the Volunteerism Functional Inventory (VFI). The survey also produced information regarding volunteer demographics (ie. including gender, age, and occupation), as well as statistics about how often they volunteer at Project C.U.R.E. and their overall satisfaction with the organization. The data was then analyzed to determine the most relevant VFI characteristic. Upon analyzing the data, it was observed that the majority of participants were male (58.95%) and were between the ages of 18 and 25 (82.11%). The results also showed that Project C.U.R.E. utilizes a large number of episodic volunteers from Arizona State University (due to its close proximity to the Phoenix warehouse) was supported in that the data showed 72.63% of participants were undergraduate students and that 48.42% had just volunteered for their first time. After combining survey questions that corresponded to the same characteristic of volunteerism as outlined by Clary et al. (values, social, career, understanding, protective, and enhancement) the average of the responses was taken and used to determine the most relevant motives for our volunteer population. Based on the data, values (average score of 5.0) and understanding (average score of 5.0) were the two most relevant characteristics and protective (average score of 1.0) was the least relevant to volunteers. Additionally, 41.1% of survey respondents reported food would incentivize them to return to Project C.U.R.E. Additionally, 35.6% of survey respondents reported receiving Project C.U.R.E. merchandise would incentivize them to return in the future. Moving forward, it is recommended that the Project CURE Phoenix location begin providing their volunteers with merchandise and other forms of recognition based on the number of hours they committed to the organization.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12