Matching Items (4)

157271-Thumbnail Image.png

An Annotated Guide to Twenty-First Century Wind Chamber Music

Description

Arnold Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, written in 1912 for an ensemble of flute, clarinet, piano, violin, cello, and voice
arrator (with certain instrumental doublings), has, since its premiere, greatly influenced composers

Arnold Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, written in 1912 for an ensemble of flute, clarinet, piano, violin, cello, and voice
arrator (with certain instrumental doublings), has, since its premiere, greatly influenced composers writing chamber music. In fact, this particular instrumentation has become known as the “Pierrot Ensemble,” with variations on Schoenberg’s creation used by Igor Stravinsky, Luciano Berio, and many other composers.

There are many resources devoted to music for chamber winds composed during the twentieth century, including those inspired by Schoenberg’s configuration. Additionally, many sources have comprehensively covered known chamber music composed before 1900. However, there is very little research dedicated to chamber wind music composed since 2000.

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the body of research about the music by: 1) creating an annotated bibliography of 21st century wind chamber music.; and 2) thereby catalyzing the discovery of recently composed wind chamber music. Moreover, I hope to address and encourage diversity through my research. To that end, the Composer’s Diversity Database was used as a primary resource for discovering compositions written since 2000 for wind/percussion-based ensembles comprising six to thirteen players.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

157442-Thumbnail Image.png

Jam Sessions as Rites of Passage: An Ethnography of Jazz Jams in Phoenix, AZ

Description

This thesis examines the jazz jam session’s function in the constitution of jazz scenes as

well as the identities of the musicians who participate in them. By employing ritual and

performance studies

This thesis examines the jazz jam session’s function in the constitution of jazz scenes as

well as the identities of the musicians who participate in them. By employing ritual and

performance studies theories of liminality, I demonstrate ways in which jazz musicians,

jam sessions, and other social structures are mobilized and transformed during their

social and musical interactions. I interview three prominent members of the jazz scene in

the greater Phoenix area, and incorporate my experience as a professional jazz musician

in the same scene, to conduct a contextually and socially embedded analysis in order to

draw broader conclusions about jam sessions in general. In this analysis I refer to other

ethnomusicologists who research improvisation, jazz in ritual context, and interactions,

such as Ingrid Monson, Samuel Floyd, Travis Jackson, and Paul Berliner, as well as ideas

proposed by phenomenologically adjacent thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze, Martin

Heidegger, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Karen Barad.

This thesis attempts to contribute to current jam session research in fields such as

ethnomusicology and jazz studies by offering a perspective on jam sessions based on

phenomenology and process philosophy, concluding that the jam session is an essential

mechanism in the ongoing social and musical developments of jazz musicians and their

scene. I also attempt to continue and develop the discourse surrounding theories of

liminality in performance and ritual studies by underscoring the web of relations in social

structures that are brought into contact with one another during the liminal performances

of their acting agents.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

157408-Thumbnail Image.png

Compositions for Trumpet by Joseph Turrin: A Historical and Musical Overview

Description

Joseph Turrin’s compositions for trumpet are frequently performed, and have

become a large part of the trumpet repertoire. His trumpet works are played at events

such as International Trumpet Guild conferences, have

Joseph Turrin’s compositions for trumpet are frequently performed, and have

become a large part of the trumpet repertoire. His trumpet works are played at events

such as International Trumpet Guild conferences, have been featured with many well-known

orchestras and bands, and are standard recital works. Many of Turrin’s trumpet

works have been performed and recorded by well-established musicians, which include

Philip Smith, Joseph Alessi, David Hickman, Robert Sullivan, Brian Shaw, Thomas

Hooten, Terry Everson, Wynton Marsalis, and Alison Balsom.

This study examines in detail each of Joseph Turrin’s twenty-four published

works for trumpet. Turrin’s pieces include Elegy, Caprice, Concerto for Trumpet, Intrada,

Two Portraits, Someone to Watch Over Me, Chronicles, Two Gershwin Portraits,

Fandango, and Three Episodes, and include pieces written for Philip Smith, Joseph

Alessi, Wynton Marsalis, Harold Lieberman, Lew Soloff, Brian Shaw, Robert Sullivan,

and Thomas Hooten. A complete history of each composition and arrangement, and

information relating to their premieres are presented. Technical elements from the music

are discussed, such as range, articulation, melodic contour, endurance, and difficult

fingerings. Biographical information such as youth, education, and career about Turrin

are incorporated, along with a discussion of his compositional characteristics and

influences. In addition, a list of each work with an assigned difficulty grade, as well as a

current discography, is included.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

157336-Thumbnail Image.png

Transcribing English Virginal Music for Two Guitars: Historical Perspective, Methodology, and Practical Applications

Description

In the 1950s, Miguel Llobet (1878–1938) and Emilio Pujol (1886–1980) published the first transcriptions of piano and orchestral music for two guitars that became staples in the repertoire. Ida Presti

In the 1950s, Miguel Llobet (1878–1938) and Emilio Pujol (1886–1980) published the first transcriptions of piano and orchestral music for two guitars that became staples in the repertoire. Ida Presti (1924–1967) and Alexandre Lagoya (1929–1999) expanded their efforts with new adaptations of Baroque, Romantic, and Modern music. Following their examples, generations of professional guitar duos have maintained a similar transcription repertoire. However, closer examination reveals noticeable gaps in it as Renaissance works have been largely overlooked. To illuminate this issue, chapter 2 revisits adaptations for two guitars of music originally written for vihuelas, lutes, viols, and the virginal to inquire about the reasons for this neglect and discuss plausible solutions. Because the virginal stands out for its innovative characteristics and alignment with the solo lute works by John Dowland (1563–1626) and John Johnson (ca. 1545–1594), the “English School” of Virginalists is further explored as a potential source of suitable works for transcriptions.

Chapter 3 discusses philosophical concepts and editorial practices to propose a method aimed at producing stylistically faithful adaptations of virginal music. The editorial criteria for this method are informed by in-depth reflections on terminology, the ontology of musical works, the notion of authenticity, and common sixteenth-century practices from musica ficta to tuning temperaments and notational conventions. Concerning ethical matters, this chapter assesses authorship issues that originated at the turn of the nineteenth century but are still adopted by modern editors and transcribers. This discussion aims to shed light on both the negative impact on intellectual property and how it can be avoided by simply resorting to the practice of scholarly transcriptions. Chapters 4 and 5 explain the procedures and applications of the proposed method in two parts: adaptation and revision. The first introduces concepts and strategies from choosing suitable works to balancing playability and aesthetic fidelity intended to produce a preliminary version of the original work. The second establishes a knowledge base through musico-historical discussions and comparative analyses of sources that inform editorial decisions and necessary changes to be implemented in the final score.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019