Matching Items (3)

128460-Thumbnail Image.png

Kinetics of small molecule interactions with membrane proteins in single cells measured with mechanical amplification

Description

Measuring small molecule interactions with membrane proteins in single cells is critical for understanding many cellular processes and for screening drugs. However, developing such a capability has been a difficult

Measuring small molecule interactions with membrane proteins in single cells is critical for understanding many cellular processes and for screening drugs. However, developing such a capability has been a difficult challenge. We show that molecular interactions with membrane proteins induce a mechanical deformation in the cellular membrane, and real-time monitoring of the deformation with subnanometer resolution allows quantitative analysis of small molecule–membrane protein interaction kinetics in single cells. This new strategy provides mechanical amplification of small binding signals, making it possible to detect small molecule interactions with membrane proteins. This capability, together with spatial resolution, also allows the study of the heterogeneous nature of cells by analyzing the interaction kinetics variability between different cells and between different regions of a single cell.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-10-23

129428-Thumbnail Image.png

Plasmonic imaging of protein interactions with single bacterial cells

Description

Quantifying the interactions of bacteria with external ligands is fundamental to the understanding of pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion, and mechanism of antimicrobial action. Due to inherent cell-to-cell heterogeneity in

Quantifying the interactions of bacteria with external ligands is fundamental to the understanding of pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion, and mechanism of antimicrobial action. Due to inherent cell-to-cell heterogeneity in a microbial population, each bacterium interacts differently with its environment. This large variability is washed out in bulk assays, and there is a need of techniques that can quantify interactions of bacteria with ligands at the single bacterium level. In this work, we present a label-free and real-time plasmonic imaging technique to measure the binding kinetics of ligand interactions with single bacteria, and perform statistical analysis of the heterogeneity. Using the technique, we have studied interactions of antibodies with single Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells and demonstrated a capability of determining the binding kinetic constants of single live bacteria with ligands, and quantify heterogeneity in a microbial population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-01-15

Plasmonic-based label-free detection and imaging of molecules

Description

Obtaining local electrochemical (EC) information is extremely important for understanding basic surface reactions, and for many applications. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can obtain local EC information by scanning a microelectrode

Obtaining local electrochemical (EC) information is extremely important for understanding basic surface reactions, and for many applications. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can obtain local EC information by scanning a microelectrode across the surface. Although powerful, SECM is slow, the scanning microelectrode may perturb reaction and the measured signal decreases with the size of microelectrode. This thesis demonstrates a new imaging technique based on a principle that is completely different from the conventional EC detection technologies. The technique, referred to as plasmonic-based electrochemical imaging (PECI), images local EC current (both faradaic and non-faradaic) without using a scanning microelectrode. Because PECI response is an optical signal originated from surface plasmon resonance (SPR), PECI is fast and non-invasive and its signal is proportional to incident light intensity, thus does not decrease with the area of interest. A complete theory is developed in this thesis work to describe the relationship between EC current and PECI signal. EC current imaging at various fixed potentials and local cyclic voltammetry methods are developed and demonstrated with real samples. Fast imaging rate (up to 100,000 frames per second) with 0.2×3µm spatial resolution and 0.3 pA detection limit have been achieved. Several PECI applications have been developed to demonstrate the unique strengths of the new imaging technology. For example, trace particles in fingerprint is detected by PECI, a capability that cannot be achieved with the conventional EC technologies. Another example is PECI imaging of EC reaction and interfacial impedance of graphene of different thicknesses. In addition, local square wave voltammetry capability is demonstrated and applied to study local catalytic current of platinum nanoparticle microarray. This thesis also describes a related but different research project that develops a new method to measure surface charge densities of SPR sensor chips, and micro- and nano-particles. A third project of this thesis is to develop a method to expand the conventional SPR detection and imaging technology by including a waveguide mode. This innovation creates a sensitive detection of bulk index of refraction, which overcomes the limitation that the conventional SPR can probe only changes near the sensor surface within ~200 nm.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011