Matching Items (4)

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Evaluation of online teacher and student materials for the Framework for K-12 Science Education: science and engineering crosscutting concepts

Description

The National Research Council developed and published the Framework for K-12 Science Education, a new set of concepts that many states were planning on adopting. Part of this new endeavor included a set of science and engineering crosscutting concepts to

The National Research Council developed and published the Framework for K-12 Science Education, a new set of concepts that many states were planning on adopting. Part of this new endeavor included a set of science and engineering crosscutting concepts to be incorporated into science materials and activities, a first in science standards history. With the recent development of the Framework came the arduous task of evaluating current lessons for alignment with the new crosscutting concepts. This study took on that task in a small, yet important area of available lessons on the internet. Lessons, to be used by K-12 educators and students, were produced by different organizations and research efforts. This study focused specifically on Earth science lessons as they related to earthquakes. To answer the question as to the extent current and available lessons met the new crosscutting concepts; an evaluation rubric was developed and used to examine teacher and student lessons. Lessons were evaluated on evidence of the science, engineering and application of the engineering for each of the seven crosscutting concepts in the Framework. Each lesson was also evaluated for grade level appropriateness to determine if the lesson was suitable for the intended grade level(s) designated by the lesson. The study demonstrated that the majority of lesson items contained science applications of the crosscutting concepts. However, few contained evidence of engineering applications of the crosscutting concepts. Not only was there lack of evidence for engineering examples of the crosscutting concepts, but a lack of application engineering concepts as well. To evaluate application of the engineering concepts, the activities were examined for characteristics of the engineering design process. Results indicated that student activities were limited in both the nature of the activity and the quantity of lessons that contained activities. The majority of lessons were found to be grade appropriate. This study demonstrated the need to redesign current lessons to incorporate more engineering-specific examples from the crosscutting concepts. Furthermore, it provided evidence the current model of material development was out dated and should be revised to include engineering concepts to meet the needs of the new science standards.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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Conference Program

Description

Official program of the Mapping Grand Canyon Conference. Document was designed and optimized for digital dissemination and mobile device (smartphone, tablet) viewing and interactive browsing. Document was deliberately not printed in paper format with the intent of minimizing the event's ecological footprint through a reduction of paper and ink waste.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-02

Geology of the Hassayampa River Canyon Area, Wickenburg, Arizona

Description

The Hassayampa River Canyon, located near Wickenburg, Arizona, is a riparian ecosystem and a popular recreational area in the arid Sonoran Desert of central Arizona. The canyon hosts well-exposed middle Cenozoic volcanic and sedimentary sequences, an underlying crystalline basement, and

The Hassayampa River Canyon, located near Wickenburg, Arizona, is a riparian ecosystem and a popular recreational area in the arid Sonoran Desert of central Arizona. The canyon hosts well-exposed middle Cenozoic volcanic and sedimentary sequences, an underlying crystalline basement, and the unconformity that separates the two packages of rocks. The crystalline basement includes Proterozoic metamorphic and granitic rocks, and a Cretaceous granodiorite intrusion. The area features extension-related normal faults, major associated tear faults, evidence for faulting during accumulation of the mid-Cenozoic sequence, and known mineral deposits, including those of manganese, gold, and copper. New geologic mapping provides the city of Wickenburg with scientific and societal information for future land-use and resource-management decisions, and improves the understanding of the geologic history of the region. New geologic mapping in the southern half of the Sam Powell Peak 7.5' Quadrangle highlights (1) mid-Cenozoic volcanism and extension that formed the main geologic features of the area, including Hassayampa River Canyon; (2) relationships between Neogene sedimentation and late Neogene basin-fill deposits, and (3) the development of the modern Hassayampa River system onto pre-existing bedrock topography. Geologic mapping was conducted under the joint State-Federal USGS National Cooperative Geologic Mapping program, and was jointly funded by the Arizona Geological Survey and USGS under EdMap award G18AC00230.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

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Implications of Learning Outcomes of In-Person and Virtual Field-Based Geoscience Instruction at Grand Canyon National Park

Description

Education through field exploration is fundamental in geoscience. But not all students enjoy equal access to field-based learning because of time, cost, distance, ability, and safety constraints. At the same time, technological advances afford ever more immersive, rich, and student-centered

Education through field exploration is fundamental in geoscience. But not all students enjoy equal access to field-based learning because of time, cost, distance, ability, and safety constraints. At the same time, technological advances afford ever more immersive, rich, and student-centered virtual field experiences. Virtual field trips may be the only practical options for most students to explore pedagogically rich but inaccessible places. A mixed-methods research project was conducted on an introductory and an advanced geology class to explore the implications of learning outcomes of in-person and virtual field-based instruction at Grand Canyon National Park. The study incorporated the Great Unconformity in the Grand Canyon, a 1.2 billion year break in the rock record; the Trail of Time, an interpretive walking timeline; and two immersive, interactive virtual field trips (iVFTs). The in-person field trip (ipFT) groups collectively explored the canyon and took an instructor-guided inquiry hike along the interpretive Trail of Time from rim level, while iVFT students individually explored the canyon and took a guided-inquiry virtual tour of Grand Canyon geology from river level. High-resolution 360° spherical images anchor the iVFTs and serve as a framework for programmed overlays that enable interactivity and allow the iVFT to provide feedback in response to student actions. Students in both modalities received pre- and post-trip Positive and Negative Affect Schedules (PANAS). The iVFT students recorded pre- to post-trip increases in positive affect (PA) scores and decreases in negative (NA) affect scores, representing an affective state conducive to learning. Pre- to post-trip mean scores on concept sketches used to assess visualization and geological knowledge increased for both classes and modalities. However, the iVFT pre- to post-trip increases were three times greater (statistically significant) than the ipFT gains. Both iVFT and ipFT students scored 92-98% on guided-inquiry worksheets completed during the trips, signifying both met learning outcomes. Virtual field trips do not trump traditional in-person field work, but they can meet and/or exceed similar learning objectives and may replace an inaccessible or impractical in-person field trip.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018