Matching Items (3)

Implementing Critical Thinking Skills into Fourth Grade Social Science Curriculum

Description

During the 2020-2021 school year, Arizona teachers will be expected to implement a new set of Social Science Standards into their curriculum. The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) issued an

During the 2020-2021 school year, Arizona teachers will be expected to implement a new set of Social Science Standards into their curriculum. The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) issued an implementation guide for these new standards that began in 2017. The upcoming 2020-2021 year will be the first year that these standards will be fully utilized in the classroom. To assist first year teachers and teachers that are struggling with the new changes, an eight-lesson work book was created. These lessons are in alignment with the updated Arizona standards, as well as the four main critical thinking skills, problem solving, questioning, evaluating sources, and decision making. These lessons were created with the Problem Based Learning style in mind and are formatted in a “5E” lesson template. The workbook features a four-lesson unit on Natural Disasters. The entire lesson is STEM based, utilizes different English Language Arts techniques, and provides interactive components. The second half of the workbook features four lessons that start a unit on Native Americans. This curriculum was created based on lesson templates provided by the Chandler Unified School District and were created to aid first year teachers, as well as teachers that need assistance with the transition to new standards.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Factors that influence teacher expectations of Africian American, Hispanic and low-income students

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There is a nationwide gap in which African American, Hispanic and low-income students perform significantly lower than their peers. Research suggests that teachers hold lower expectations for these students resulting

There is a nationwide gap in which African American, Hispanic and low-income students perform significantly lower than their peers. Research suggests that teachers hold lower expectations for these students resulting in lower achievement. There are four main factors that influence teacher expectations: stereotypes, teacher self-efficacy, school culture, language and formal policies and programs aimed at increasing teacher expectations. The purpose of this study was to inquire into the following questions: (1) What are the factors that influence teachers' academic expectations for low-income and minority students? (2) What are teacher's perceptions on the effectiveness of formal policies and programs that are aimed at increasing teacher expectations? More specifically, do teachers feel that top-down formal policies, such as teacher evaluations, uniform curriculum, and performance-based pay are effective in impacting their expectations, or do teachers believe that bottom-up policies, such as book studies and professional learning communities, make more of an impact on increasing their expectations? Ten teachers were interviewed in a school district that is consistent with the state and national achievement gap. The findings revealed that teacher expectations are influenced by the four factors I found in the research as well as two other factors: a cultural disconnect among teachers and students and teachers' level of motivation. A combination of top-down and bottom-up formal policies and programs are needed as teachers are individuals and all respond to various forms of formal policies and programs differently.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African refugee middle school students in a southwest U.S. state

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ABSTRACT This study examined the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee students in a metropolitan area of the United States Southwest. The research questions underpinning

ABSTRACT This study examined the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee students in a metropolitan area of the United States Southwest. The research questions underpinning this study included: What are the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled sub-Saharan African middle school refugee students in a southwestern U.S. state? 1a) How do they view their relationships with their teachers and peers? 1b) Can they identify a teacher or school staff member in their school community who is a significant resource for them? and 1c) What factors contribute to their challenges and successes in their school community? This qualitative study documented and analyzed the schooling experiences and perceptions of resettled refugee middle school students, who are relatively new to the U.S. educational system. Purposive and convenience sampling were sources utilized in selecting participants for this study. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to capture the stories of 10 resettled sub-Saharan African refugee students enrolled in 7th and 8th grade, who have lived in the U.S. not more than 10 years and not less than three years. Among the participants, half were male and half female. They came from six countries: Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone and Somalia. Findings of the study revealed six major themes: teachers' helpfulness, positive perceptions of school, friends as resources at school, disruptive students in the classroom, need for better teachers, and before and after school activities. Overall, the participants in the study expressed a positive perception of their teachers and their schools, yet presented a dichotomous view of their schooling experiences and perceptions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012