Matching Items (158)

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Nutrition and Activity Education for Hispanic Children: An Updated Curriculum

Description

This project modifies an existing theory-based culturally responsive nutrition and physical activity curriculum designed for early adolescent Hispanic children. Modifications to the Salud con Sabor Latino para los Ninos (SSLN) curriculum, originally designed for adolescents, include didactic content and activities

This project modifies an existing theory-based culturally responsive nutrition and physical activity curriculum designed for early adolescent Hispanic children. Modifications to the Salud con Sabor Latino para los Ninos (SSLN) curriculum, originally designed for adolescents, include didactic content and activities which are evidence-based and age appropriate for younger children (second to fourth grade). Using a community based participatory research approach, culturally responsive and developmentally cognizant modifications were made based on child development theories, social behavior theory, and evidence of successful obesity interventions among this age group. The end goal is to assist the community partner, Esperança, and provide an opportunity to impact obesity rates in this high risk population.
The goal of the updated eight session SSLN program is to decrease BMI, increase nutritional knowledge, and improve attitude and behavior towards nutrition and physical activity in Hispanic school-aged children. After meeting with Esperança to identify which elements of the curriculum needed modification, an extensive literature review was conducted to identify new and relevant research appropriate to the modifications. Integrating child development theories, social behavior theory, and results from earlier successful obesity intervention programs, curriculum sessions will be condensed and modified using a community base participatory research approach. Once edits to the curriculum are completed and approved, Esperança will implement the newly modified curriculum, and evaluate the success of the curriculum changes.
The final project is composed of a condensed, theory-based, culturally responsive, and developmentally age appropriate eight session curricula that will educate Hispanic school-aged children on nutrition and physical activity.

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2018-05

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Free Bird: Preventing Sexual Assault on College Campuses

Description

Sexual assault affects hundreds of thousands of individuals every year. College students are especially at risk as women ages 18-24 are 3 times more likely to be a victim of sexual assault than other females (Campus Sexual Violence, n.d.). Because

Sexual assault affects hundreds of thousands of individuals every year. College students are especially at risk as women ages 18-24 are 3 times more likely to be a victim of sexual assault than other females (Campus Sexual Violence, n.d.). Because victims of sexual assault can experience negative sequelae for weeks, months, and even years after the incident occurs, it is critical to provide them with easily accessible help and guidance. For my thesis project, I investigated how sexual assault influences these victims' lives as well as what help is readily accessible to them. After researching sexual assault in college students and reading through many websites, articles, and journals, I researched the types of information provided to sexual assault victims through the websites of national sexual violence organizations. I then coded the websites of Arizona colleges and universities (N = 10) for the topics covered in their sites. Because several of these colleges had inadequate material on their websites, I developed a website that would provide additional information to sexual assault survivors. The idea of Free Bird is to establish a safe space for victims of sexual assault to find information that will allow them to heal along their journey. I learned a lot while completing this project, and I hope that the creation of this website will allow others to become more educated on the topic and realize what a problem sexual assault is in our society today.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Parental Stress in Raising a Child with ADHD

Description

This paper investigates how stress in parents is affected by their child's Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this paper is to identify common stressors for parents of children with ADHD, as well as to determine what parents need from

This paper investigates how stress in parents is affected by their child's Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this paper is to identify common stressors for parents of children with ADHD, as well as to determine what parents need from healthcare providers to mediate this stress. A survey was developed to identify sources of stress, consequences of parental stress, parental coping methods, resources provided by their healthcare provider that have been helpful, along with what they feel that they need from their healthcare providers in order to better support themselves and their family. Participants were composed of members of Facebook support groups for parents of children with ADHD. Major findings of this study include: parents experience the most stress when dealing with their child's oppositional and aggressive behaviors; parents frequently experience disruption in their marital relationship; and parents perceive that they receive little health care resources that are helpful for themselves, their child, and their family overall.

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2018-05

Development of Case Material for Confederates in Arizona State University Nursing Simulations

Description

This paper reviews a creative project designed to enhance the simulation experience for College of Nursing and Health Innovation nursing students at Arizona State University. Simulation allows students to practice imperative skills in a safe environment, free from the risk

This paper reviews a creative project designed to enhance the simulation experience for College of Nursing and Health Innovation nursing students at Arizona State University. Simulation allows students to practice imperative skills in a safe environment, free from the risk of injury to patients and the consequences of making these errors, in order to master skills that are essential in the clinical setting. Students are able to practice a wide range of invasive and noninvasive skills and hone in on their clinical judgement and critical thinking to make decisions that may be life threatening in a clinical situation. The group members designed written training materials and created corresponding video vignettes that would be utilized to enhance the confederate role and provide the students a deeper understanding of their simulated patient and the simulation scenario. The written training materials that were developed include confederate background information, patient and family education, and guided questions and answers for the video vignettes. The written training materials will be used to guide the students that are portraying the family member during the simulation. Trained standardized patients were hired to play the confederate role in the four video vignettes. The video vignettes portrayed interviews with a family member of the patient that delved into how they felt about their family member's hospitalization and what they hoped to learn from the nurses during their family member's hospitalization. The vignettes will be used to guide students to the needs of the patients and families in the corresponding scenarios. These vignettes will be accessible by students before the start of simulation in order to enhance understanding of the patient and ultimately, the scenario.

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Date Created
2018-12

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Content Analysis of Existing Nutrition Marketing Materials in Central Arizona Schools

Description

The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the content of nutrition marketing materials within the cafeterias of schools in Central Arizona. By collecting photographs of marketing material from three elementary schools, one K-8 school, three middle schools

The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the content of nutrition marketing materials within the cafeterias of schools in Central Arizona. By collecting photographs of marketing material from three elementary schools, one K-8 school, three middle schools and three high schools, 59 pieces of nutrition marketing were gathered. The schools chosen were a convenience sample and selected from schools that were already participating in ASU' s School Lunch Study. The photographs were sorted by grade level and then coded quantitatively and qualitatively for their purpose, visual components, strategies used and relevance. Results from this novel study provided insight into prevalence, size, textual content, educational content, strategies for fruit and vegetable marketing, messaging and overall design of existing nutrition marketing within the sample schools. This study found that the prevalence of nutrition marketing within all school cafeterias appeared to be low, particularly within elementary and middle schools. Diverse types of messaging were present among elementary, middle and high schools and a variety of appeals were utilized with little consistency. Many of the strategies used in the nutrition marketing appeared disconnected from the population it was intended to appeal to. Educational components were notably lacking within middle school cafeterias but were often effectively integrated into high school nutrition marketing. The results are unique to this population, and further research is required to evaluate the content of existing nutrition material on a larger scale, so efforts can be made to improve the persuasiveness of nutrition marketing in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption.

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Date Created
2018-12

Relationship Between Physical Activity, VLDL Lipoproteins, and T2DM Risk in Obese Latino Youth

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between VLDL and diabetes risk factors, and the impact of a lifestyle intervention on VLDL levels in obese Latino youth. Participants (N=160) in this study were taken from a lager

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between VLDL and diabetes risk factors, and the impact of a lifestyle intervention on VLDL levels in obese Latino youth. Participants (N=160) in this study were taken from a lager diabetes prevention program for Latino adolescents (Age=14.8±0.8 years, BMI=98.2±1.4). Youth participated in a 12-week lifestyle intervention that included physical activity (60 minutes, 3x/week) and nutrition education sessions (60 minutes, 1x/week) that were delivered to families at the downtown Phoenix YMCA. Primary outcomes included VLDL and diabetes risk factors including fasting and 2-hour glucose and insulin which were measured at baseline and 12-weeks post-intervention. Baseline VLDL levels were significantly correlated with fasting insulin (r =.270, P<0.01) and youth who were more insulin resistant displayed higher VLDL levels compared to youth who were less insulin resistant derived from fasting insulin levels (M=29.8±14.7 mg/dl vs. M=21.6±9.6 mg/dl, P<0.01). In total, 77 participants completed the lifestyle intervention. At post-intervention, VLDL levels were significantly reduced (M=26.0±13.3 mg/dl to M=23.3±11.6 mg/dl, P=0.02). Culturally-grounded, community-based, family-focused lifestyle interventions are a promising approach for reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors in high-risk youth at risk for diabetes.

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2018-12

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Exploring the Development of Writing Abilities and Writing Confidence in RN-BSN Students

Description

The purpose of the study was to explore students' writing abilities throughout the online RN-BSN program at a large urban university in the Southwest. The aims of the study were: 1) explore how students' writing abilities, confidence in writing, and

The purpose of the study was to explore students' writing abilities throughout the online RN-BSN program at a large urban university in the Southwest. The aims of the study were: 1) explore how students' writing abilities, confidence in writing, and ability to locate resources change throughout the online RN-BSN program, 2) identify which aspects of writing students consider to be their strengths and/or challenges, and 3) explore which factors predict how well students write, their confidence in writing, and their ability to locate resources. After obtaining IRB approval, an invitation to participate in the study was sent to students enrolled in four different courses within the RN-BSN program. Students who chose to participate completed a 16-item questionnaire in which they rated their writing abilities, confidences, and skills, indicated strengths and challenges in their writing, and skills in locating evidence-based resources. An improvement was noted in students' self-rated academic writing confidence, professional writing confidence, internet reference skills, and library reference skills. The number of years as a registered nurse predicted overall writing ability and academic writing confidence.

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Date Created
2018-05

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The Heritability of Different Indices of the Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm in Middle Childhood and Phenotypic Associations with the Home Environment

Description

Research has shown that environmental stressors that occur during childhood and early adolescence are associated with multiple deficits in physiological and psychological functioning later in life. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been proposed as a potential biological mechanism through which

Research has shown that environmental stressors that occur during childhood and early adolescence are associated with multiple deficits in physiological and psychological functioning later in life. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been proposed as a potential biological mechanism through which these phenotypic alterations occur as studies have shown a link between early life adversity and altered diurnal cortisol patterns (Goldman-Mellor, Hamer, & Steptoe, 2012; Gunnar & Quevedo, 2008). Given research has shown that diurnal cortisol levels are influenced by genetic factors (Veen et al., 2011), but that a majority of differences across subjects can be attributed to the environment (Schreiber et al., 2006), phenotypic associations were explored between the quality of the home environment and children's diurnal cortisol patterns. The first aim of this study was to determine the level of genetic and environmental contributions to different parameters of diurnal cortisol rhythm. The second aim of this study was to examine whether the quality of the home environment, particularly indicators involving parenting and the physical environment, was associated with these same diurnal cortisol measures. A diverse sample of 320 twin children were assessed at 8 years using gold standard home environment interviews and a measure of diurnal cortisol rhythm across three days with three samples taken from each twin every day. Twin intraclass correlations indicated high levels of heritability for the morning to afternoon diurnal cortisol slope as well as the afternoon to evening slope, while measures of cortisol in the afternoon, evening, and across the day showed low levels of heritability, which suggested that differences in the environment were a more influential factor. Multilevel regression analyses showed that the overall quality of the home environment was found to be significantly negatively associated with cortisol levels at bedtime and negatively associated across the morning to afternoon slope at a trend level. The physical environment and emotional climate of the home were not significantly associated with any indicators of the diurnal cortisol pattern. A unique seasonality effect was noted as cortisol measurements taken from participants during the summer were significantly increased when compared to participants throughout the rest of the year. Overall, these findings showed a unique association between the quality of the home environment and diurnal cortisol levels at bedtime and perhaps the change in cortisol levels across the morning to afternoon, as well as a possible seasonal covariate which may affect diurnal cortisol measurements and one which often goes overlooked in cortisol research.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Spina Bifida Cross-Sectional Study

Description

The number of individuals born with the neural tube defect, spina bifida, is still widespread here in the United States. To briefly explain, spina bifida is a birth defect where the baby's vertebrae does not fully enclose the spinal cord.

The number of individuals born with the neural tube defect, spina bifida, is still widespread here in the United States. To briefly explain, spina bifida is a birth defect where the baby's vertebrae does not fully enclose the spinal cord. There are specifically four types of spina bifida, with varying degrees of severity. This severity can range from no symptoms to complete paralysis below the cleft area. To put this issue into perspective, approximately 166,000 individuals in the United States, today, are affected by spina bifida (National Health Institute, 2017). The purpose of the study is to determine if there is a knowledge discrepancy of health care needs between individuals who have Spina Bifida and ASU students studying a health profession. This will determine if there is a need to improve health care education of students, professionals, and members of a spina bifida association in respect to spina bifida. Not only that, this study will also identify if there is a need to increase awareness and prevention of spina bifida in the community to improve health outcomes for those affected by spina bifida. A total of 136 participants were studied with the 32-question survey. It was found, through the survey, that there was a knowledge mismatch between spina bifida members and ASU students who were studying a health profession. This knowledge mismatch was also compared with how well they answered the various questions as a group.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Impact of Sex Differences and Tumor Location on Survival Outcomes in Glioblastoma Patients Receiving Standard of Care

Description

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults and is linked to poor survival in affected patients due to its invasive and aggressive nature. The potential role of sexual dimorphism in GBM outcomes has long been

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults and is linked to poor survival in affected patients due to its invasive and aggressive nature. The potential role of sexual dimorphism in GBM outcomes has long been overlooked. Notably, males and females differ in tumor behavior across many cancers1, which may be attributable to differences in genetic makeup and physiology, and in GBM there is a difference in incidence rate between males and females. The aim of the study was to investigate sex differences in GBM patients and compare median survival outcomes (OS) and progression-free survival outcomes (PFS) between sexes based on tumor location, laterality, age, tumor volume, and extent of resection. Patients who received standard-of-care (Stupp protocol) consisting of surgical intervention, concomitant chemoradiation, and 6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) were included in this study to investigate sex differences in tumor characteristics (n = 216; males: n = 129, females: n = 87). Pre-surgical MRIs, specifically T1Gd sequences, were analyzed to determine tumor laterality and location. The patient cohort was divided into two groups indicating the extent of resection (EOR) they received: Gross Total Resection (GTR) and Subtotal Resection (STR). Additionally, the patient cohort was split into three age groups (Group I: 18-29, Group II: 30-49, and Group III: >50). Analyses were done using independent t-test and Cox proportional hazard modeling to determine which variables affect patient survival. The log-rank test was utilized to compare differences in survival rate in Kaplan-Meier analysis.
Overall, our results suggest that female patients receiving standard-of-care may have a better prognosis than male patients. There was a significant difference in OS and PFS in females showing an increase in survival. Additionally, survival was significantly different between sexes following resection, with female patients receiving STR or GTR having longer OS and PFS than males. The difference in median OS between sexes is more pronounced among younger patients. Among five different brain locations, female patients who possess a frontal lobe tumor may live longer than male patients. The apparent difference in OS for patients living >1000 days in the Kaplan-Meier plot warrants further investigation in a larger cohort. Following tumor resection, female patients with a frontal lobe tumor may survive longer in comparison to male patients. Comparing brain hemispheres, patients who possessed a tumor on the left may survive longer. Investigating tumor location and tumor laterality, our results suggests that female patients with a left frontal lobe tumor show a significant survival advantage in comparison to females who possess a right frontal lobe tumor.

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2018-05