Matching Items (23)

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Game as Life, Life as Game: A Study on Successful Behavior Change with Ubiquitous Computing

Description

Abstract Whether it is an abandoned New Year's Resolution or difficulty controlling procrastination, most can attest to failing to meet a goal. With ubiquitous computing, there is potential to support users' goals on a constant basis with pervasive technology elements

Abstract Whether it is an abandoned New Year's Resolution or difficulty controlling procrastination, most can attest to failing to meet a goal. With ubiquitous computing, there is potential to support users' goals on a constant basis with pervasive technology elements such as integrated sensors and software. This study serves as a pilot for the behavior change component of a ubiquitous system, Game as Life, Life as Game (GALLAG), and how goal creation and motivation can be positively altered with the inclusion of a specific framework for users to follow. The study looked to find the efficacy of support tools (goal creation, reflection on past experience, and behavior change techniques and self-tracking) on creating a plan to reach a behavior goal, without the help of technology. Technology was ignored to focus on the effect of a framework for goal and plan generation. Over two weeks, there were 11 participants in the study; data collected was qualitative in the form of three video-recorded interview sessions, with quantitative data in the form of surveys. Participants were presented with support tools and tasked with picking a goal to work towards, as well as creating a plan to reach that goal. It was found that users struggled to create specific and detailed plans, even with the support tools provided, but this improved after the first meeting. Past experience was the most helpful support tool for creating better plans, however participants used this tool before being briefed on it. These results suggest a system should incorporate behavior change, self-tracking, and past experience earlier in the plan creation experience, allowing users a more concrete knowledge of these tools before beginning plan creation. By including these ideas in a framework, GALLAG can later implement that framework to better support users with a physical system. Keywords: behavior change, goal creation, motivation, self-efficacy, ubiquitous computing, pervasive game, human computer interaction

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Date Created
2014-05

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GALLAG strip: a mobile, programming with demonstration environment for sensor-based context-aware application programming

Description

The Game As Life - Life As Game (GALLAG) project investigates how people might change their lives if they think of and/or experience their life as a game. The GALLAG system aims to help people reach their personal goals through

The Game As Life - Life As Game (GALLAG) project investigates how people might change their lives if they think of and/or experience their life as a game. The GALLAG system aims to help people reach their personal goals through the use of context-aware computing, and tailored games and applications. To accomplish this, the GALLAG system uses a combination of sensing technologies, remote audio/video feedback, mobile devices and an application programming interface (API) to empower users to create their own context-aware applications. However, the API requires programming through source code, a task that is too complicated and abstract for many users. This thesis presents GALLAG Strip, a novel approach to programming sensor-based context-aware applications that combines the Programming With Demonstration technique and a mobile device to enable users to experience their applications as they program them. GALLAG Strip lets users create sensor-based context-aware applications in an intuitive and appealing way without the need of computer programming skills; instead, they program their applications by physically demonstrating their envisioned interactions within a space using the same interface that they will later use to interact with the system, that is, using GALLAG-compatible sensors and mobile devices. GALLAG Strip was evaluated through a study with end users in a real world setting, measuring their ability to program simple and complex applications accurately and in a timely manner. The evaluation also comprises a benchmark with expert GALLAG system programmers in creating the same applications. Data and feedback collected from the study show that GALLAG Strip successfully allows users to create sensor-based context-aware applications easily and accurately without the need of prior programming skills currently required by the GALLAG system and enables them to create almost all of their envisioned applications.

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Date Created
2012

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Home Automation's Influence on Life

Description

This honors thesis utilizes smart home components and concepts from Dr. Burleson's Game as Life, Life as Game (GaLLaG) systems. The thesis focuses on an automated lifestyle, where individuals utilize technology, such as door sensors, appliance and lamp modules, and

This honors thesis utilizes smart home components and concepts from Dr. Burleson's Game as Life, Life as Game (GaLLaG) systems. The thesis focuses on an automated lifestyle, where individuals utilize technology, such as door sensors, appliance and lamp modules, and system notifications, to assist in daily activities. The findings from our efforts to date indicate that after weeks of observations, there is no evidence that automated lifestyles create more productive and healthy lifestyles and lead to overall satisfaction in life; however, there are certain design principles that would assist future home automation applications.

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Date Created
2013-05

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The CARE/ERS System: Developing and Evaluating Smart Homes for Autism

Description

An investigation of the Caregiver Autism Residential E-health (CARE) system composed of low-cost, end-user deployable smart home technology and accompanying heuristics for rule-based models of human behavior has been evaluated for its potential as an empowering assistive technology with the

An investigation of the Caregiver Autism Residential E-health (CARE) system composed of low-cost, end-user deployable smart home technology and accompanying heuristics for rule-based models of human behavior has been evaluated for its potential as an empowering assistive technology with the capacity to enhance the well-being of people living with autism, their caregivers, and family members. It allows adults living with autism to create personalized smart home interventions that provide motivational support and is accompanied by guidelines for a safe and effective means of behavioral change. This investigation contributes a participatory co-design approach which addresses both the role of flexibility for the dynamic needs of the individual while offering strategies for dealing with the challenges of designing assistive smart home technologies for the needs of individuals across the wide range of autism spectrum disorders.

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Date Created
2013-05

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Inventors' Workshop: Your Passion, Your Education, Your Expertise

Description

The 21st century engineer will face a diverse set of challenges spread out along a broad spectrum of disciplines. Among others, the fields of energy, healthcare, cyberspace, virtual reality, and neuroscience require monumental efforts by the new generation of engineers

The 21st century engineer will face a diverse set of challenges spread out along a broad spectrum of disciplines. Among others, the fields of energy, healthcare, cyberspace, virtual reality, and neuroscience require monumental efforts by the new generation of engineers to meet the demands of a growing society. However the most important, and likely the most under recognized, challenge lies in developing advanced personalized learning. It is the core foundation from which the rest of the challenges can be accomplished. Without an effective method of teaching engineering students how to realize these grand challenges, the knowledge pool from which to draw new innovations and discoveries will be greatly diminished. This paper introduces the Inventors Workshop (IW), a hands-on, passion-based approach to personalized learning. It is intended to serve as a manual that will inform the next generation of student leaders and inventioneers about the core concepts the Inventors Workshop was built upon, and how to continue improvement into the future. Due to the inherent complexities in the grand challenge of personalized learning, the IW has developed a multifaceted solution that is difficult to explain in a single phrase. To enable comprehension of the IW's full vision, the process undergone to date of establishing and expanding the IW is described. In addition, research has been conducted to determine a variety of paths the Inventors Workshop may utilize in future expansion. Each of these options is explored and related to the core foundations of the IW to assist future leaders and partners in effectively improving personalized learning at ASU and beyond.

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Date Created
2012-12

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Improving the Mentoring Program for Industrial Design Students at ASU

Description

My thesis is on the subject of mentoring. I researched the benefits and the styles of programs available and then used my research to create a survey to give to IDSA national members to see what they believe would make

My thesis is on the subject of mentoring. I researched the benefits and the styles of programs available and then used my research to create a survey to give to IDSA national members to see what they believe would make a good mentoring program. From there I tried to improve the current ASU IDSA mentoring program.

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Date Created
2013-05

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Towards seamless and secure mobile authentication

Description

With the rise of mobile technology, the personal lives and sensitive information of everyday citizens are carried about without a thought to the risks involved. Despite this high possibility of harm, many fail to use simple security to protect themselves

With the rise of mobile technology, the personal lives and sensitive information of everyday citizens are carried about without a thought to the risks involved. Despite this high possibility of harm, many fail to use simple security to protect themselves because they feel the benefits of securing their devices do not outweigh the cost to usability. The main issue is that beyond initial authentication, sessions are maintained using optional timeout mechanisms where a session will end if a user is inactive for a period of time. This interruption-based form of continuous authentication requires constant user intervention leading to frustration, which discourages its use. No solution currently exists that provides an implementation beyond the insecure and low usability of simple timeout and re-authentication. This work identifies the flaws of current mobile authentication techniques and provides a new solution that is not limiting to the user, has a system for secure, active continuous authentication, and increases the usability and security over current methods.

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Date Created
2014

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Design and development of an immersive virtual reality team trainer for advance cardiac life support

Description

Technology in the modern day has ensured that learning of skills and behavior may be both widely disseminated and cheaply available. An example of this is the concept of virtual reality (VR) training. Virtual Reality training ensures that learning can

Technology in the modern day has ensured that learning of skills and behavior may be both widely disseminated and cheaply available. An example of this is the concept of virtual reality (VR) training. Virtual Reality training ensures that learning can be provided often, in a safe simulated setting, and it may be delivered in a manner that makes it engaging while negating the need to purchase special equipment. This thesis presents a case study in the form of a time critical, team based medical scenario known as Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). A framework and methodology associated with the design of a VR trainer for ACLS is detailed. In addition, in order to potentially provide an engaging experience, the simulator was designed to incorporate immersive elements and a multimodal interface (haptic, visual, and auditory). A study was conducted to test two primary hypotheses namely: a meaningful transfer of skill is achieved from virtual reality training to real world mock codes and the presence of immersive components in virtual reality leads to an increase in the performance gained. The participant pool consisted of 54 clinicians divided into 9 teams of 6 members each. The teams were categorized into three treatment groups: immersive VR (3 teams), minimally immersive VR (3 teams), and control (3 teams). The study was conducted in 4 phases from a real world mock code pretest to assess baselines to a 30 minute VR training session culminating in a final mock code to assess the performance change from the baseline. The minimally immersive team was treated as control for the immersive components. The teams were graded, in both VR and mock code sessions, using the evaluation metric used in real world mock codes. The study revealed that the immersive VR groups saw greater performance gain from pretest to posttest than the minimally immersive and control groups in case of the VFib/VTach scenario (~20% to ~5%). Also the immersive VR groups had a greater performance gain than the minimally immersive groups from the first to the final session of VFib/VTach (29% to -13%) and PEA (27% to 15%).

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Date Created
2012

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A graphical language for LTL motion and mission planning

Description

Linear Temporal Logic is gaining increasing popularity as a high level specification language for robot motion planning due to its expressive power and scalability of LTL control synthesis algorithms. This formalism, however, requires expert knowledge and makes it inaccessible to

Linear Temporal Logic is gaining increasing popularity as a high level specification language for robot motion planning due to its expressive power and scalability of LTL control synthesis algorithms. This formalism, however, requires expert knowledge and makes it inaccessible to non-expert users. This thesis introduces a graphical specification environment to create high level motion plans to control robots in the field by converting a visual representation of the motion/task plan into a Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) specification. The visual interface is built on the Android tablet platform and provides functionality to create task plans through a set of well defined gestures and on screen controls. It uses the notion of waypoints to quickly and efficiently describe the motion plan and enables a variety of complex Linear Temporal Logic specifications to be described succinctly and intuitively by the user without the need for the knowledge and understanding of LTL specification. Thus, it opens avenues for its use by personnel in military, warehouse management, and search and rescue missions. This thesis describes the construction of LTL for various scenarios used for robot navigation using the visual interface developed and leverages the use of existing LTL based motion planners to carry out the task plan by a robot.

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Date Created
2013

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Assessing cognitive learning of analytical problem solving

Description

Introductory programming courses, also known as CS1, have a specific set of expected outcomes related to the learning of the most basic and essential computational concepts in computer science (CS). However, two of the most often heard complaints in such

Introductory programming courses, also known as CS1, have a specific set of expected outcomes related to the learning of the most basic and essential computational concepts in computer science (CS). However, two of the most often heard complaints in such courses are that (1) they are divorced from the reality of application and (2) they make the learning of the basic concepts tedious. The concepts introduced in CS1 courses are highly abstract and not easily comprehensible. In general, the difficulty is intrinsic to the field of computing, often described as "too mathematical or too abstract." This dissertation presents a small-scale mixed method study conducted during the fall 2009 semester of CS1 courses at Arizona State University. This study explored and assessed students' comprehension of three core computational concepts - abstraction, arrays of objects, and inheritance - in both algorithm design and problem solving. Through this investigation students' profiles were categorized based on their scores and based on their mistakes categorized into instances of five computational thinking concepts: abstraction, algorithm, scalability, linguistics, and reasoning. It was shown that even though the notion of computational thinking is not explicit in the curriculum, participants possessed and/or developed this skill through the learning and application of the CS1 core concepts. Furthermore, problem-solving experiences had a direct impact on participants' knowledge skills, explanation skills, and confidence. Implications for teaching CS1 and for future research are also considered.

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2011