Matching Items (8)

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Achieving Zero: Building a Zero Waste Program for the Sprouts Farmers Market Headquarters

Description

As the sustainability issue of solid waste management magnifies worldwide, organizations are considering making their offices or operations Zero Waste, but many do not understand how or where to start. With the goal of contributing insights and advice to future

As the sustainability issue of solid waste management magnifies worldwide, organizations are considering making their offices or operations Zero Waste, but many do not understand how or where to start. With the goal of contributing insights and advice to future designers and managers of Zero Waste programs, this thesis explores notable attributes of existing Zero Waste programs through case interviews and documents the researcher’s own journey in designing and executing a Zero Waste program at the Sprouts Farmers Market headquarters. The result is a detailed account that reveals how the Sprouts program was executed, how it could be improved, and which practices future Zero Waste program managers should use to maximize the success of their program. These practices include building personal and trusting relationships with the network of people involved; remaining flexible, patient and passionate; conducting thorough quantitative research on the proposed changes; and tailoring communication to effectively motivate behavior change.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Economic Development vs. Human Development in St. Lucia

Description

This honors thesis examines the relationship between economic development and human development in the Caribbean island nation of St. Lucia. Factors affecting this relationship such as foreign direct investment and governmental policy were studied. Economic and human development indicators as

This honors thesis examines the relationship between economic development and human development in the Caribbean island nation of St. Lucia. Factors affecting this relationship such as foreign direct investment and governmental policy were studied. Economic and human development indicators as well as personal interviews were utilized to determine the state of this relationship. This study showed that recent economic growth in St. Lucia is becoming increasingly unsustainable and may not be leading to improvements in human development, while also directly worsening inequality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council Landing Pages: Using SPLC's Community Platform to Advance Category-specific Strategies

Description

My creative thesis project was done through a collaborative project with Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council (SPLC), a non-profit organization whose mission is to support and recognize suppliers and buyers that champion a transition to sustainability-driven value within the purchasing process

My creative thesis project was done through a collaborative project with Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council (SPLC), a non-profit organization whose mission is to support and recognize suppliers and buyers that champion a transition to sustainability-driven value within the purchasing process of corporations and other organizations. Within the SPLC intranet available to members, there is an abundance of guidance to purchasing professionals procuring materials and services required by their organization. This guidance comes in forms such as case studies, example contract language, webinars, green certifications and labels, and various helpful tools. The issue and value add of the project lies in the current organization and location of guidance on the SPLC website. Much of the information is scattered, and many stakeholders have voiced their confusion when seeking guidance on a particular project or process they are undergoing.

Our solution, the “Category Landing Pages” would tackle this issue by re-organizing SPLC’s resources into category specific pages where any and all guidance SPLC has on a particular purchasing category can be easily accessed. Many procurement professionals often specialize and deal in a certain spend or commodity category, which makes a category organized page the most logical. This is certainly valuable to individuals and organizations who subscribe to a membership with SPLC, but there is also opportunity for SPLC to benefit from this restructuring.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Uncovering relationships between sustainable business practice bundles, organizational culture, and performance

Description

Corporations work to reduce their negative impacts on the environment and society by adopting Sustainable business (SB) practices. Businesses create competitive advantages via practices such as waste minimization, green product design, compliance with regulations, and stakeholder relations. Normative models

Corporations work to reduce their negative impacts on the environment and society by adopting Sustainable business (SB) practices. Businesses create competitive advantages via practices such as waste minimization, green product design, compliance with regulations, and stakeholder relations. Normative models indicate that businesses should adopt similar sustainability practices, however, contingency theory suggests that effectiveness of practices depends on the context of the business. The literature highlights the importance of organizational culture as a moderating variable between SB practices and outcomes, however this link has not been empirically examined. This thesis presents the development and testing of a theoretical model, using configuration theory, that links SB practices, organizational culture, and financial performance.

Published frameworks were utilized to identify SB practices in use, and the Competing Values Framework (CVF) to identify dimensions of culture. Data from 1021 Corporate Sustainability Reports from 212 companies worldwide was collected for computerized text analysis, which provided a measure of the occurrence of a specific SB practice and the four dimensions of the CVF. Hypotheses were analyzed using cluster, crosstab, and t-test statistical methods.

The findings contribute significant insights to the Business and Sustainability field. Firstly, clustering of SB practice bundles identified organizations at various levels of SB practice awareness. The spectrum runs from a compliance level of awareness, to a set of organizations aware of the importance of culture change for sustainability. Top performing clusters demonstrated different priorities with regards to SB practices; these were in many cases, related to contextual factors, such as location or sector. This implies that these organizations undertook varying sustainability strategies, but all arrived at some successful level of sustainability. Another key finding was the association between the highest performing SB practice clusters and a culture dominated by Adhocracy values, corroborating theories presented in the literature, but were not empirically tested before.

The results of this research offer insights into the use of text analysis to study SB practices and organizational culture. Further, this study presents a novel attempt at empirically testing the relationship between SB practices and culture, and tying this to financial performance. The goal is that this work serves as an initial step in redefining the way in which businesses adopt SB practices. A transformation of SB practice adoption will lead to major improvements in sustainability strategies, and subsequently drive change for improved corporate sustainability.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017

Please Be Hospitable: How Regenerative Agriculture Can Address Arizona's Biosphere and Drought

Description

Since the 1980’s, there has been a growing interest in the concept of sustainability. The prime directive of sustainability is to balance the needs of economics, environmental health, and human society. The change in the global climate, loss of biodiversity,

Since the 1980’s, there has been a growing interest in the concept of sustainability. The prime directive of sustainability is to balance the needs of economics, environmental health, and human society. The change in the global climate, loss of biodiversity, increased levels of pollution, and general trend toward resource scarcity have all increased the momentum of the contemporary sustainability movement. Simultaneously, poverty and nutrition scarcity have attracted many to sustainability’s principles of resource equity. What one can gather from the diversity of sustainability’s intended functions is that it’s meant to solve several problems at once. In another sense, the most impactful sustainability solutions are multipurpose. This is not to say that any given solution is a panacea. On the contrary, sustainability advocates often dispute the existence of so-called “silver bullets” for these global issues. While this tends to reign true, it does not stop policy makers, communities, or researchers from attempting to employ multifaceted solutions. One such example is the myriad of sustainability issues associated with industrial agriculture. With the compounding issues of high water consumption, habitat destruction via land use change, biodiversity loss and climate change, industrial agriculture appears to be a damaging system. Areas like Arizona are projected to be affected by many of these issues. It thus stands to reason that if Arizona is to aggressively address its long-term drought, as well as global sustainability issues, a systematic change in farming practices needs to be made. Firstly, an analysis of the agricultural and water histories of Arizona will highlight the events most relevant to the region’s contemporary issues. Following this, the analysis will frame the greater problem through specific pieces of evidence associated with water scarcity in Arizona. Then, a summary of findings will illustrate the fundamental theories surrounding regenerative agriculture and three of its alternative forms: permaculture, dryland farming, and carbon farming. These theories will be instrumental in recommending a useful conception of regenerative agriculture for Arizona; it will be known as a Regenerative Dryland Farming System (RDFS). The extent and utility of current solutions will then be explored. The remainder of the section will illustrate the principles of the RDFSs, explore their potential weaknesses, and recommend policy for their successful deployment. Overall, it will be argued that RDFSs should fully replace industrial agriculture in Arizona. This will be vital in addressing the nine planetary boundaries and freshwater reality of the region.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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How do employee pro-environmental behaviors relate to the perceived success of workplace environmentally sustainable activities?

Description

For decades, understanding the complexity of behaviors, motivations, and values has interested researchers across various disciplines. So much so that there are numerous terms, frameworks, theories, and studies devoted to understanding these complexities and how they interact and evolve into

For decades, understanding the complexity of behaviors, motivations, and values has interested researchers across various disciplines. So much so that there are numerous terms, frameworks, theories, and studies devoted to understanding these complexities and how they interact and evolve into actions. However, little research has examined how employee behaviors translate into the work environment, particularly regarding perceived organizational success. This study advances research by quantitatively assessing how a greater number of individual employees’ pro-environmental behaviors are related to the perceived success of environmentally sustainable workplace activities. We have concluded that the more pro-environmental behaviors an employee embodies, the more positively they perceive the success of their local government's sustainable purchasing policy. Additionally, other factors matter, including organizational behaviors, like training, innovation, and reduction of red tape.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-04-19

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Meyers Final Project (Spring 2022)

Description

Since the 1980’s, there has been a growing interest in the concept of sustainability. The prime directive of sustainability is to balance the needs of economics, environmental health, and human society. The change in the global climate, loss of biodiversity,

Since the 1980’s, there has been a growing interest in the concept of sustainability. The prime directive of sustainability is to balance the needs of economics, environmental health, and human society. The change in the global climate, loss of biodiversity, increased levels of pollution, and general trend toward resource scarcity have all increased the momentum of the contemporary sustainability movement. Simultaneously, poverty and nutrition scarcity have attracted many to sustainability’s principles of resource equity. What one can gather from the diversity of sustainability’s intended functions is that it’s meant to solve several problems at once. In another sense, the most impactful sustainability solutions are multipurpose. This is not to say that any given solution is a panacea. On the contrary, sustainability advocates often dispute the existence of so-called “silver bullets” for these global issues. While this tends to reign true, it does not stop policy makers, communities, or researchers from attempting to employ multifaceted solutions. One such example is the myriad of sustainability issues associated with industrial agriculture. With the compounding issues of high water consumption, habitat destruction via land use change, biodiversity loss and climate change, industrial agriculture appears to be a damaging system. Areas like Arizona are projected to be affected by many of these issues. It thus stands to reason that if Arizona is to aggressively address its long-term drought, as well as global sustainability issues, a systematic change in farming practices needs to be made. Firstly, an analysis of the agricultural and water histories of Arizona will highlight the events most relevant to the region’s contemporary issues. Following this, the analysis will frame the greater problem through specific pieces of evidence associated with water scarcity in Arizona. Then, a summary of findings will illustrate the fundamental theories surrounding regenerative agriculture and three of its alternative forms: permaculture, dryland farming, and carbon farming. These theories will be instrumental in recommending a useful conception of regenerative agriculture for Arizona; it will be known as a Regenerative Dryland Farming System (RDFS). The extent and utility of current solutions will then be explored. The remainder of the section will illustrate the principles of the RDFSs, explore their potential weaknesses, and recommend policy for their successful deployment. Overall, it will be argued that RDFSs should fully replace industrial agriculture in Arizona. This will be vital in addressing the nine planetary boundaries and freshwater reality of the region.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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Please Be Hospitable Presentation

Description

Since the 1980’s, there has been a growing interest in the concept of sustainability. The prime directive of sustainability is to balance the needs of economics, environmental health, and human society. The change in the global climate, loss of biodiversity,

Since the 1980’s, there has been a growing interest in the concept of sustainability. The prime directive of sustainability is to balance the needs of economics, environmental health, and human society. The change in the global climate, loss of biodiversity, increased levels of pollution, and general trend toward resource scarcity have all increased the momentum of the contemporary sustainability movement. Simultaneously, poverty and nutrition scarcity have attracted many to sustainability’s principles of resource equity. What one can gather from the diversity of sustainability’s intended functions is that it’s meant to solve several problems at once. In another sense, the most impactful sustainability solutions are multipurpose. This is not to say that any given solution is a panacea. On the contrary, sustainability advocates often dispute the existence of so-called “silver bullets” for these global issues. While this tends to reign true, it does not stop policy makers, communities, or researchers from attempting to employ multifaceted solutions. One such example is the myriad of sustainability issues associated with industrial agriculture. With the compounding issues of high water consumption, habitat destruction via land use change, biodiversity loss and climate change, industrial agriculture appears to be a damaging system. Areas like Arizona are projected to be affected by many of these issues. It thus stands to reason that if Arizona is to aggressively address its long-term drought, as well as global sustainability issues, a systematic change in farming practices needs to be made. Firstly, an analysis of the agricultural and water histories of Arizona will highlight the events most relevant to the region’s contemporary issues. Following this, the analysis will frame the greater problem through specific pieces of evidence associated with water scarcity in Arizona. Then, a summary of findings will illustrate the fundamental theories surrounding regenerative agriculture and three of its alternative forms: permaculture, dryland farming, and carbon farming. These theories will be instrumental in recommending a useful conception of regenerative agriculture for Arizona; it will be known as a Regenerative Dryland Farming System (RDFS). The extent and utility of current solutions will then be explored. The remainder of the section will illustrate the principles of the RDFSs, explore their potential weaknesses, and recommend policy for their successful deployment. Overall, it will be argued that RDFSs should fully replace industrial agriculture in Arizona. This will be vital in addressing the nine planetary boundaries and freshwater reality of the region.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05