Matching Items (54)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

126917-Thumbnail Image.png

Motivational Interviewing Impact on Cardiovascular Disease

Description

Harm reduction in cardiovascular disease is a significant problem worldwide. Providers, families, and healthcare agencies are feeling the burdens imparted by these diseases. Not to mention missed days of work and caregiver strain, the losses are insurmountable. Motivational interviewing (MI)

Harm reduction in cardiovascular disease is a significant problem worldwide. Providers, families, and healthcare agencies are feeling the burdens imparted by these diseases. Not to mention missed days of work and caregiver strain, the losses are insurmountable. Motivational interviewing (MI) is gaining momentum as a method of stimulating change through intrinsic motivation by resolving ambivalence toward change (Ma, Zhou, Zhou, & Huang, 2014).

If practitioners can find methods of educating the public in a culturally-appropriate and sensitive manner, and if they can work with community stakeholders to organize our resources to make them more accessible to the people, we may find that simple lifestyle changes can lead to risk reduction of cardiovascular diseases. By working with our community leaders and identifying barriers unique to each population, we can make positive impacts on a wide range of issues that markedly impact our healthcare systems.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-04-28

162138-Thumbnail Image.png

Childhood Drowning: How Can Healthcare Providers Help?

Description

Introduction: Drowning is the leading cause of death in children between 1 and 4 years of age; in Arizona drownings are double the national average for this age group. The goal of this Doctor of Nursing project was to educate

Introduction: Drowning is the leading cause of death in children between 1 and 4 years of age; in Arizona drownings are double the national average for this age group. The goal of this Doctor of Nursing project was to educate and empower pediatric providers to give quality drowning prevention (DP) anticipatory guidance (AG) to caregivers of children between 1 and 4 years of age at every well exam.
Method: This quality improvement (QI) project included 32 providers from six pediatric clinics in Arizona. A one-hour education session focused on drowning prevention followed one month later by a a thirty-minute follow-up feedback session were conducted. Pre- and post- education surveys were administered at the first session to measure perceived previous and future intended DP AG practice. An additional follow-up survey was administered at the second session to evaluate perceived change. In addition, caregivers were contacted and surveyed one to three months post initial education to assess provider delivery of AG. Likert-scales and descriptive statistics were used to evaluate data sets.
Results: Post-educational intervention, providers reported increased intention (p = 0.027) to provide water safety AG, and increased intention (p < 0.001) to connect water AG to developmental milestones. Post-intervention follow-up indicated an increased provision of developmentally specific water safety AG to caregivers (p < 0.001) and increased connection of developmental milestones in AG (p = 0.016). Barriers that prevent water safety AG were reported as time constraints and other perceived AG of higher priority.
Implications: This QI project adds to the literature and demonstrates the benefit of education to invigorate and empower increased provision of quality DP AG from providers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-22

162139-Thumbnail Image.png

Strategies for Help in Crowded Emergency Rooms

Description

Objective: Pediatric patients with asthma are frequently cared for in the emergency department (ED). Many studies show early administration of corticosteroids (CS) can improve outcomes for children experiencing an asthma exacerbation. Despite the evidence, delays in care remain. The purpose

Objective: Pediatric patients with asthma are frequently cared for in the emergency department (ED). Many studies show early administration of corticosteroids (CS) can improve outcomes for children experiencing an asthma exacerbation. Despite the evidence, delays in care remain. The purpose of this study is to streamline the process for nurse-initiated, triage-based CS administration and determine the effect on overall length of stay (LOS). Methods: For this quality improvement initiative, ED nurses at a large, freestanding, children’s emergency department in the southwestern United States were given education on inclusion and exclusion criteria for nurse-initiated CS in ED triage. Time to CS administration, LOS, and whether the ED nurse or provider ordered the CS were evaluated through chart reviews of patients presenting with a chief complaint of difficulty breathing. These metrics were compared to charts from the previous year during the same timeframe to evaluate for improved timeliness of CS delivery. Results: Time to CS administration decreased from a mean of 98.6 minutes to 57.6 minutes. LOS decreased from an average of 259.3 minutes to 169.6 minutes. The effect of timely CS on LOS was significant for December p =.003, January p =.002, and February p = <.001. Conclusion: A streamlined process for CS delivery to pediatric patients experiencing an asthma exacerbation can enable providers to achieve efficient and effective care in the ED and decrease a patient’s overall LOS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-23

162140-Thumbnail Image.png

Bringing Visibility to Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A Needs Assessment to Inform Camp Programming

Description

Sickle cell disease is a genetic hemoglobinopathy resulting in chronic and daily pain, risk of serious sequelae, and altered activities of daily living. Resources dedicated to helping individuals with sickle cell disease are lacking, especially compared to other chronic diseases.

Sickle cell disease is a genetic hemoglobinopathy resulting in chronic and daily pain, risk of serious sequelae, and altered activities of daily living. Resources dedicated to helping individuals with sickle cell disease are lacking, especially compared to other chronic diseases. Children with sickle cell disease experience school absence, fractured peer relationships, frequent healthcare visits, stigma, and feelings of isolation. Additionally, chronic pain decreases developmentally important play and physical activity in these children. The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) project is to conduct a needs assessment to inform sickle cell disease family camp programming in southern Arizona. Once a camp experience can be safely implemented, the effects of a camp experience on knowledge, empowerment, and disease management in children with sickle cell disease will be investigated. Research specific to camps for children suffering from sickle cell disease is lacking, however ample evidence suggests the benefit of disease specific camps. Medical specialty camps provide an opportunity for children and families to normalize their condition, participate in activities, and form peer relationships in an environment that safely accommodates their unique needs. This has led to the initiation of an evidence-based project to develop a needs assessment for families affected by sickle cell disease and community partners to inform camp activity development guided by Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Framework for Program Evaluation.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2021-04-23

162141-Thumbnail Image.png

Improving Patient Outcomes through Use of a Stroke Navigator Program

Description

BACKGROUND: Stroke is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Of the 800,000 strokes that occur in the United States annually, one quarter can be described as recurrent events. Timeliness of care and patient education are considered critical

BACKGROUND: Stroke is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Of the 800,000 strokes that occur in the United States annually, one quarter can be described as recurrent events. Timeliness of care and patient education are considered critical tenets of stroke management. These interventions limit neuronal loss and prepare the patient to adopt lifestyle changes that prevent recurrent stroke. Several previous studies demonstrate that the use of patient navigator programs can improve clinical outcomes in this patient population. METHODS: A stroke navigator quality improvement program was designed and deployed at a stroke center in the American Southwest. During the 3-month study, patients diagnosed with stroke were enrolled by means of implied consent (n=52). Subjects were followed from emergency department presentation to discharge. Interventions aimed to reduce times from door to computed tomography (CT), door to alteplase, and door to thrombectomy. Patients were also provided education, emotional support, and case management. Positive response was defined as reduction in time taken to achieve core measures when compared with baseline institutional data. RESULTS: Two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank tests were utilized to compare two large data sets: baseline door to CT, alteplase, and thrombectomy mean times for three months preceding the intervention to the three month period during which the intervention was deployed. No statistical significance was demonstrated. Next, the same test was used to compare baseline CT time data to the smaller group of patients that were treated by the stroke navigator. This showed that the stroke navigator yielded significant reduction in door to CT times when compared to baseline institutional performance (p=0.015). CONCLUSION: In concurrence with previous research, the stroke navigator program was successful in improving the quality of stroke care, notably during the acute phase when expedited computed tomography is needed to prevent neuronal loss. Further research is needed to determine if the intervention could improve door to alteplase and thrombectomy times as well as prevent stroke readmissions.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2021-04-23

162142-Thumbnail Image.png

Data Management and Technology Avoidance in a Free Clinic

Description

Capturing and presenting high-quality data can be challenging for free clinics due to lack of resources and technology avoidance. If free clinics are unable to present impactful data to current and potential donors, this may limit funding and restrict care

Capturing and presenting high-quality data can be challenging for free clinics due to lack of resources and technology avoidance. If free clinics are unable to present impactful data to current and potential donors, this may limit funding and restrict care provided to underserved and vulnerable populations. The following is a quality improvement project which addresses utilization of information systems within a free clinic. For one month, volunteer providers completed appointment summary forms for each patient seen in the clinic. Electronic form submissions (E=110) were compared to paper form submissions (P=196), with quality of data determined by form completeness scores. Welch’s t-test was used to determine statistical significance between electronic and paper form completeness scores (E=9.7, P=8.5) (p < .001). Findings suggest that utilization of electronic data collection tools within a free clinic produce more complete and accurate data. Barriers associated with technology utilization in this under-resourced environment were substantial. Findings related to overcoming some of these barriers may be useful for future exploration of health information technology utilization in under-resourced and technology avoidant settings. Results warrant future investigation of the relationship between quality of free clinic data, information management systems, provider willingness to utilize technology and funding opportunities in free clinics.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2021-04-24

162143-Thumbnail Image.png

Joy in Work: Addressing Nurse Burnout through Mindfulness

Description

Aim: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of mindfulness as an intervention in reducing burnout and promoting joy in work for progressive care unit (PCU) nurses and nursing aides. Background: The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) describes a lack of joy in work

Aim: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of mindfulness as an intervention in reducing burnout and promoting joy in work for progressive care unit (PCU) nurses and nursing aides. Background: The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) describes a lack of joy in work and the resultant burnout as a serious threat to healthcare workers and organizations. Few studies have examined this phenomenon in PCU nurses and aides. Method: Pre- and post-intervention surveys with established instruments on three variables, mindfulness, burnout, and joy in work, were administered to ten PCU nurses and aides (N = 7) at a city hospital. The intervention was the virtual IHI's mindfulness course and was guided by Martin Seligman's PERMA Model and the Iowa Model for Evidenced Based Practice. A paired sample t-test was used to evaluate changes in the pre-post survey responses. Results: Significant increase in joy in work based on an alpha value of 0.05, p = .041. Slight increase in mindfulness practice based on an alpha value of 0.05, p = .398. Burnout remained the same based on an alpha value of 0.05, p = .766. Conclusion: PCU nurses and aides who practiced mindfulness for 12 weeks scored the same on burnout scales and higher on the joy in work scales. Implications for Nursing Management: Nurse managers can incorporate mindfulness exercises at strategic times during the shift to reduce burnout and promote joy in work for nurses and aides. Future EBP projects should assess the effectiveness of different mindfulness activities in promoting nurses' emotional and psychological well-being in various care settings.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-24

162144-Thumbnail Image.png

Redesigning Evidence-Based Initiatives for Nurses

Description

Healthcare organization leaders greatly rely on evidence-based practice (EBP) to guide the delivery of care and support clinical decisions on patient care. EBP is a process of assessing and implementing best evidence, patient values, and clinical expertise to make clinical

Healthcare organization leaders greatly rely on evidence-based practice (EBP) to guide the delivery of care and support clinical decisions on patient care. EBP is a process of assessing and implementing best evidence, patient values, and clinical expertise to make clinical decisions on patient care. Engagement in EBP is an opportunity to overcome the barriers that lead to poor patient and system outcomes. However, EBP implementation can be difficult due to barriers such as lack of time, lack of EBP knowledge, lack of leadership support, and difficulty accessing resources. Several studies support educational programs for nurses to strengthen EBP beliefs and implementation. The purpose of this project was to increase participation in EBP for nurses practicing at Mayo Clinic Arizona. The project involved planning for redesign of existing EBP courses along with new types of support and educational sessions. DNP students participated in the initiative through searching for and synthesizing evidence, collecting and analyzing survey data, and presenting recommendations for program development and outcome measurement to nursing leaders in the organization.
Keywords: evidence-based practice, hospital, nurses, engagement, continuing education

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2021-04-25

162145-Thumbnail Image.png

Ending HIV: Improving Providers Perceptions and Implementation Practices of Preexposure Prophylaxis in Females at Risk of HIV Infection

Description

Introduction: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a critical development in HIV prevention, yet females at risk of contracting HIV have lower rates of PrEP use compared to their male counterparts. Insufficient knowledge on PrEP indications for women has been a key

Introduction: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a critical development in HIV prevention, yet females at risk of contracting HIV have lower rates of PrEP use compared to their male counterparts. Insufficient knowledge on PrEP indications for women has been a key barrier in health care providers (HCP) utilization of PrEP in this population. Prior research has revealed educational interventions improved providers’ use of PrEP in at risk populations.
Methods: A 1-hour, educational session was developed for eleven HCPs at a university-based clinic. The educational session was guided by the Cognitive Learning Theory and included information on clinical practice guidelines for PrEP implementation in women. The effects of the intervention were analyzed using a pre/post-survey design, with post surveys delivered at two and eight weeks. The 16-item survey evaluated outcomes including provider discussion and prescription rates of PrEP with female patients and perceived knowledge and perceptions of PrEP in women, utilizing a Likert scale. All procedures were given exempt status by the university IRB.
Results: Paired sample t tests were used to analyze provider reported conversations and prescription rates, while matched ordinal data were analyzed utilizing Wilcoxon signed rank tests and descriptive statistics. At two-weeks post intervention there was a significant increase in provider’s reported likelihood of prescribing to at risk cis gender females in the next six months (Mdn= 2 [pre-survey], Mdn = 3 [post-survey], α= 0.05, V = 0.00, z = -2.53, p = .011). At eight weeks postintervention, there was a statistically significant decrease in provider’s beliefs that HIV risk assessment was an essential component of a primary care visit for female patients (Mdn = 3.00 [pre], Mdn = 2.00 [eight-week], α= 0.05, V = 10.00, z = -2, p = .046). The results of the data analysis have been shared with the leadership team of the health clinic and used to inform future practice on provider educational sessions on PrEP.
Conclusion: Women at risk of contracting HIV are a key demographic missed for the utilization of PrEP. Limited statistically significant findings from the intervention have prompted further research to focus on interventions that promote long-term behavior change and improve providers implementation practices of the preventive measure in at-risk female identifying patients.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-25

162146-Thumbnail Image.png

Evaluating the Efficacy of Calcium Chloride versus Calcium Gluconate in ECMO Initiation for Neonates

Description

Purpose: Neonates who require Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) are at risk for calcium derangements and associated adverse outcomes. A large children’s hospital in the Southwest changed their practice from using calcium gluconate in priming their neonatal ECMO to using calcium

Purpose: Neonates who require Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) are at risk for calcium derangements and associated adverse outcomes. A large children’s hospital in the Southwest changed their practice from using calcium gluconate in priming their neonatal ECMO to using calcium chloride. The impact of this change was not investigated.
Methods: A retrospective chart review of 56 neonates who required ECMO support one year prior to and one year following the practice change was conducted. Descriptive data was collected along with the first ionized calcium measured following ECMO initiation.
Results: Upon review of the data, the post-ECMO calcium levels were not significant between the calcium gluconate and calcium chloride groups using a Mann Whitney U test (U = 315.5, z = -1.25, p = .213). However, a Chi-square test was significant (χ2(1) = 4.94, p = .026) for having calcium values outside of a normal range in the calcium gluconate group. Fisher’s exact test revealed an odds ratio of 3.43 for the first calcium being outside normal range in the calcium gluconate group.
Implications: While comparison of the first measured ionized calcium post-ECMO between the two groups was not statistically significant, there was a significant correlation with normal post-ECMO calcium in the calcium chloride group. This suggest that both calcium gluconate and calcium chloride are appropriate for use in priming the neonatal ECMO circuit, however calcium chloride may provide tighter control of calcium during ECMO initiation in neonates.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-25