Matching Items (10)

A Pilot Study: Using Visual Supports to Teach Algebraic Problem Solving Skills to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Description

My Barrett Honors Thesis Paper synthesizes three components of my Thesis Project, which demonstrates the process of developing strong research from the beginning stage of investigation of a problem to

My Barrett Honors Thesis Paper synthesizes three components of my Thesis Project, which demonstrates the process of developing strong research from the beginning stage of investigation of a problem to implementation of an intervention to address that problem. Specifically, I engaged in research on the topic of mathematics and students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). My review of the literature demonstrated a current dearth in the knowledge on effective interventions in math for this population of students. As part of my project, I developed and implemented an intervention to address the problem and help improve the knowledge base in the fields of autism and mathematics. Through the initial research process it was determined that students with autism spectrum disorders are being included more frequently in the general educational setting, and are therefore increasingly expected to access and master core curricular content, including mathematics. However, mathematics often presents challenges to students with ASD. Therefore, the first part of my Thesis Project is a comprehensive literature review that synthesized eleven studies of mathematics intervention strategies for students with ASD. Researching the current literature base for mathematics interventions that have been implemented with students with ASD and finding only eleven studies that met the inclusionary criteria led to the writing of the second part of my Thesis Project. In this second portion, I present how three research-based practices for students with autism, self-management, visual supports, and peer-mediated instruction, can be implemented in the context of teaching a higher-level mathematics skill, algebraic problem solving, specifically to students with ASD. By employing such strategies, teachers can assist their students with ASD to benefit more fully from mathematics interventions, which in turn may help them strengthen their mathematics skills, increase independence when completing problems, and use acquired skills in community or other applied settings. As part of the second portion of my Thesis Project, I developed a visual support strategy called COSMIC (a mnemonic device to guide learners through the steps of algebraic problem solving) to help aid students with ASD when solving simple linear equations. With the goal of contributing to the current research base of mathematics interventions that can support students with ASD, for the final part of Thesis Project I worked with a local middle school teacher to assist her in implementing our COSMIC intervention with her student with ASD. Results indicated the student improved in his algebraic problem solving skills, which suggests additional interventions with students with ASD to be recommended as part of future research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Technological Equity in Local and National K-12 Education: How Can I Be More Mindful About Promoting Digital Access and Fluency in My Future Classroom?

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine how I, as a future teacher, can best combat inequities in technological access and fluency in my future classroom. In this study,

The purpose of this study was to determine how I, as a future teacher, can best combat inequities in technological access and fluency in my future classroom. In this study, I explored a range of literature on the role of technology in the classroom, the digital divide in home and school settings, and variance in digital literacy. Additional insight was gained through interviews and observing school faculty in three public school districts in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. This provided a better understanding of local context in order to gain a sense of the national and local realities of the digital landscape as they relate to educational equity in the educational settings where I aim to serve as a certified teacher.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Is An Enviable Life An Achievable Option for Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in the United States: A Review of Literature

Description

This literature review investigates the idea of what makes a person’s life ‘enviable’ by defining the term and then by exploring the question of whether or not young adults with

This literature review investigates the idea of what makes a person’s life ‘enviable’ by defining the term and then by exploring the question of whether or not young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States can achieve an enviable life as defined. This literature review synthesizes current and historic research through an analysis of various studies on outcomes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), their families, and the resources offered within community platforms to help create such a life for young adults with IDD. This review also aims to help change society’s views on young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and challenges the community to address this issue further in order to create a more accessible, enviable, and inclusive lifestyle for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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A Comprehensive Literature Review of Evidence-based Interventions in Science for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Description

Students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly included in general education and are expected to access core content, including science. Development of science content knowledge, scientific literacy, and scientific

Students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly included in general education and are expected to access core content, including science. Development of science content knowledge, scientific literacy, and scientific thinking are areas emphasized in legislation as well as the National Science Education Standards (NSES) as critical for all students. However, participation in science inquiry and discourse is often challenging for students with ASD given their difficulties with communication. Moreover, evidence on teaching academic content, such as science, to students with disabilities is limited. This comprehensive literature review synthesized ten studies of science intervention strategies for students with ASD. Findings suggest that students struggle with obtaining and retaining the background knowledge and strenuous vocabulary necessary to be successful with science content. Though studies related to instructional interventions in science for students with ASD are limited, these students can benefit from direct instruction through the implementation of supplementary materials such as e-texts, graphic organizers, and scripted lessons. Although there is not much research that supports inquiry-based practices, these interventions engage and assist students in the science curriculum by providing hands-on explorations with the material. Evidence-based practices for interventions in science for students with ASD have focused on direct instruction and inquiry-based practices. Direct instruction elicits explicit strategies in delivering science content concretely and directly. Many direct instruction approaches deal with the incorporation of visual supports and supplementary material to guide in student retention and access of complex ideas and terminology. Through direct instruction, the teacher facilitates and leads instruction to benefit the acquisition of science background knowledge. Contrastingly, inquiry-based practices encourage independent learning and hands-on explorations. While science is frequently inquiry-based in the general education setting, the communication challenges for students with ASD may contribute to difficulties with interactions and collaborations among peers within an inquiry lesson. Future implications include the need for additional, empirically-supported interventions in science for students with ASD and the need to target more inquiry-based science interventions for this population.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Financial Literacy: Issues in Achieving a Post-Secondary Education

Description

The purpose of this review is to address issues that high school students face as future adults and the need for a comprehensive financial literacy program. Students today have a

The purpose of this review is to address issues that high school students face as future adults and the need for a comprehensive financial literacy program. Students today have a wider array of opportunities and a greater number of resources to help them achieve the goals they set for themselves. Financial literacy is the understanding of the impact of today's financial decisions upon one's future selves and their ability to manage their financial resources. There is a need to understand the human capital value of a post-secondary education and how to how to achieve it from a financially sound perspective. For those that choose to seek a post-secondary education there are many financial options for those who need assistance in paying for college. Additionally, it is not enough to succeed in affording a high education, but in also understanding the true worth of the resources one has and the significance of sustaining those resources to keep negative repercussions at bay. Thus, there are benefits of having a comprehensive financial literacy program for high school students, which allow them to make well-informed decisions that would influence their future in significant ways.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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STEM Outreach for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Description

As the economy becomes more technologically driven the need for people in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) fields also increases. STEM fields have been overrun with white males. Congress

As the economy becomes more technologically driven the need for people in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) fields also increases. STEM fields have been overrun with white males. Congress has been trying to promote minority groups in these fields for thirty years with little success. One of the largest underrepresented groups is individuals with disabilities. This thesis project focuses on STEM outreach for a particular group of disabled, the deaf and hard of hearing. There is a long history of deaf and hard of hearing children being poorly educated due to actions by the hearing community. Deaf and hard of hearing children are isolated not only from other deaf individuals but from their natural language, sign language. The goal of this project is to promote better educational practices and opportunities for deaf and hard of hearing children that also encourage an interest in STEM fields and education. This goal is met through the creation of the website deafstem.com. The website promotes the ideals set by the Bill of Rights for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children established in part by the National Association of the Deaf (NAD). These include the ideals that a deaf or hard of hearing child has the same ability and capacity for language as any other child and that language pertains to both English and American Sign Language (ASL), that the families of these children play a significant role in their success, and that these children should have access and exposure to deaf and hard of hearing adults. The website build a bridge between deaf children, their hearing family, and the deaf community while promoting STEM fields by providing ASL dictionaries for both STEM and everyday vocabulary, biographies of influential deaf adults in STEM fields, and extracurricular activities for deaf and hard of hearing children.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Best Practices for Teaching Argument Writing in Secondary Schools

Description

This honors thesis outlines a method for teaching argument writing in the secondary classroom, including the elements of an argument based upon the Toulmin method, and diverse ways to hel

This honors thesis outlines a method for teaching argument writing in the secondary classroom, including the elements of an argument based upon the Toulmin method, and diverse ways to help students who are all types of learners become engaged and receive the support they need. It includes all elements of argument, including evidence, warrants, backing, counterargument, claims, theses, the rhetorical triangle and the rhetorical appeals, including definitions and how they fit together in an argumentative essay. The largest portion of the project is dedicated to activities and resources for teachers based upon all of those elements, along with activities for the writing process as a whole. These activities are based upon the student's individual experience as well as various scholarly resources from leading professionals in the curriculum development field for English Language Arts. This is not meant to be an end-all be-all solution for teaching argument writing, but rather one of many resources that teachers can use in their classroom. This 30-page paper, including references, are condensed into an accessible website for teachers to use more easily. Each tab on the website refers to a different element or focus of the argument writing process, with both a definition and introduction as well as one or more activities for teachers to implement into the classroom. The activities are versatile and general for the purpose of teachers being able to include them into whatever curriculum they are currently teaching. The goal is that they can add argument instruction into what they are already either willingly or being required to teach in an easy and logical way. The website is available for any secondary teachers to use as they see fit at www.teachingargumentwriting.weebly.com.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Gamification of Math: Integrating Games into 6th Grade Curriculum to Promote Inquiry-based Learning

Description

The stigma surrounding math- that it is difficult, pointless, and requires your brain to be wired a certain way- has for a long time impacted the success of students throughout

The stigma surrounding math- that it is difficult, pointless, and requires your brain to be wired a certain way- has for a long time impacted the success of students throughout their schooling. Students sometimes perceive math as boring and begin to lose focus when the math concepts become more abstract as they reach middle school and high school. Sixth grade is when the brain shifts to more abstract thinking as kids transition from the concrete operational stage to the formal operational stage of cognitive development. This shift is reflected in the math curriculum and contributes to the struggle students face in learning math. To increase student engagement, gamification is a way to incorporate elements of gaming into education. Gamification can be used to motivate and encourage students to participate in their learning. In this project, a unit for 6th graders was designed to help combat students' math perception and failure that centers around a mystery game. Students learn about variables and expressions while engaging with the interactive mystery.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Strengthening Relationships among Teachers and Caregivers in Early Care and Education: A Strategy to Prevent Expulsion

Description

Across contexts, researchers have exposed the immense impact that early childhood experiences and high-quality caregiver relationships have on a developing child, which has resulted in much motivation to increase the

Across contexts, researchers have exposed the immense impact that early childhood experiences and high-quality caregiver relationships have on a developing child, which has resulted in much motivation to increase the quality of early care and education (ECE) programs at a national level. Unfortunately, as research has revealed the positive influence that quality ECE has on a child’s ultimate outcomes, it has also shed light on a social problem that intricately affects society: preschool expulsion. To address this issue, several interventions have been created, however the teacher-caregiver relationship has yet to be a central point of solution. Therefore, a relational cultural communication training (RCCT) was developed to support teachers as they work with families whose children are at-risk for expulsion, and it served as the intervention that was studied in this action research project.

This mixed method action research study (MMAR) sought to examine the constructs of empathy and culture as they pertain to teacher-caregiver relationships from the vantage point of the eight ECE teachers that participated in this project. Specifically, interview transcripts and journals were qualitatively assessed to illuminate teacher perspectives on the roles that both culture and empathy play in relationships with caregivers whose children are at-risk for expulsion. Further, the study examined teacher attitudes towards engaging with caregivers before and after the RCCT intervention using interviews, journals and an evidence-based pre- and post-survey tool as data sources. Bioecological systems theory (BST) and relational cultural theory (RCT) framed the research questions that guided this project.

Results suggested that the RCCT was a useful intervention that supported ECE teachers in their ability to connect with caregivers whose children are at-risk. Particularly, findings revealed that (a) ECE teachers do feel that both empathy and culture influence their ability to connect with caregivers, (b) RCCT was helpful in shifting teacher practices with families from an empathy standpoint, and (c) cultural differences and negative interactions adversely informed a teacher’s relational capacity with caregivers, ultimately adversely affecting child outcomes. The discussion of these findings summarizes study conclusions and how they might inform practice, implications for future research and practice, and limitations to consider.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Social Skills and Executive Functioning in Children with PCDH-19

Description

Social skill impairments and executive dysfunctions caused by epilepsy adversely affect the social, psychological, and cognitive wellbeing of children and their families.

Studies show that children with epilepsy are exposed

Social skill impairments and executive dysfunctions caused by epilepsy adversely affect the social, psychological, and cognitive wellbeing of children and their families.

Studies show that children with epilepsy are exposed to social, emotional, academic, personality, and behavioral problems when compared to healthy peers. This study focused on identifying the gaps between social skills and executive functioning among children with PCDH-19.

The researcher relied on the responses from the sampled population to create reliable findings, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations for this project. The study used quantitative design and self-report approach whereby the participants completed survey that was comprised of various rating scales. The study sample consisted of 25 participants. Results demonstrated a close correlation between social skills and executive functions among the children with PCDH-19 epilepsy. SSIS assessment indicated that children exhibited problems in social skills, academic competence, and behaviors. BRIEF-2 rating showed planning, attention, problem-solving, cognitive and emotional problems. The findings exhibited that the significant challenges encountered by girls with PCDH-19 include low levels of social competence which affect decision making in friendships, communicating, and interaction.

Keywords: social skills, executive functioning, PCDH-19, epilepsy, seizures, social assessment, cognitive measurement

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019