Matching Items (5)

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The First Sin and Its Punishment

Description

The "First Sin and Its Punishment" refers to a sub-heading from the Old Testament in which the consequences of the sin committed by Adam and Eve are discussed. The idea

The "First Sin and Its Punishment" refers to a sub-heading from the Old Testament in which the consequences of the sin committed by Adam and Eve are discussed. The idea of sin intrigues me and this thesis is a collaboration of my ideas concerning justice and injustice, science and nature, individual potential and the human spirit. I believe that, sometimes, acts of sin can be beautiful when they represent the rejection of normative standards and do not actively harm others. Sins only assume meaning in the context of existing social norms, and, as can be seen throughout history, these norms are constantly evolving. I also focus on the juxtaposition of beauty and evil in my work, and reference Christianity and other mythologies. I hope that my work offers an exploration of human desires and the subconscious to those who seek it.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2002-05

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Ekphrastic Science Fiction: Stories and Paintings Inspired by Art History

Description

The common human experiences depicted in classical paintings from art history are becoming less relatable due to the increasing influence and presence of technology in our day to day lives.

The common human experiences depicted in classical paintings from art history are becoming less relatable due to the increasing influence and presence of technology in our day to day lives. This project contains two parts. The first part is a remixing of 3 classical works of art so that they include the presence of technology and communicate the possible evolution of human experiences as technology will be incorporated into them. The three remixed paintings are as follows: Eduoard Manet's Olympia, which showcases the human experience of relationships and gender dynamics; Edgar Degas' Dancers, which showcases the human experience of creation and learning; and Raphael's Madonna del Granduca, which showcases the human experiences of child-rearing, maternity, and childhood. The second part of the project utilizes the ekphrastic process, ekphrasis being the process of using the written word to give voice and explanation to a piece of visual art. In this part of the project, three short science-fiction stories were written, one in response to each of the classical paintings and its respective remix. The stories focus on themes of how technology will integrate itself into the common human experiences of parenting, entertainment, and intimate relationships, and the problems and solutions that may arise as a result. The stories are intended to be read alongside the paintings, however they can also be read separately without the context of the paintings from which they were drawn. Likewise, the paintings can be viewed separately from the short stories. The work is complimentary and builds on itself.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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International Business within Italian Borders: An Economic and Historical Approach

Description

The core of international business practices revolve around conducting business with other countries, and the need to understand the differences in legal, economic, and unique cultural practices. While every

The core of international business practices revolve around conducting business with other countries, and the need to understand the differences in legal, economic, and unique cultural practices. While every country has its own unique economic practices, Italy’s major cities each have its own individual business practices. This is a result of Italy’s rich history with each of the major regions and its capitals acting as singular city-states or republics. Even after the unification of Italy in the 19th century, major cities of various regions of the country have very different economic practices. From this research, it is evident that these industrial local differences are due to the key historical discrepancies that are characteristic to each city. The geographically spaced major cities that were analyzed are: Milan, Florence, Rome, and Amalfi. We looked at what each city was known for economically, and took a step back to see why its history eventually made that city famous for that. The research showed that Milan is a known global fashion hub due to increased production in the textile industries, changes in local perceptions of fashion, and the overall ability to adapt to the fashion demands that were not being met by other fashion capitals at the time a century ago. The biggest sector of Florence’s economy is cultural tourism, and this is due to Florence’s rich prevalence in art history and the Renaissance. Next, Rome’s economy is centered on politics and services industries. This research shows that Rome was the voted capital due to its significance as the head of the ancient Roman Empire, as well as its central location within the country. Moving even more south is Amalfi and its famous coast. Economically, it is known for its production of limoncello liqueur. This is due to its agricultural history of cultivating the unique Amalfi lemons and its importance with sailors and trading with the Middle East. Each city has different cultures, economic practices, and history, because of Italy’s past as a collection of independent city-states. For the creative project element of this research, a painting was created for each city to artistically display the city’s history that influenced its current economy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Why are People People? An Illustrated Guide to Human Evolution

Description

I was a curious child who grew up to be a curious adult. Ever since I learned how to read, I have had a passion for science and learning new

I was a curious child who grew up to be a curious adult. Ever since I learned how to read, I have had a passion for science and learning new things. I chose to watch the Discovery channel over any other network on TV, and I was drawn to the non-fiction section of the Phoenix Public Library. My parents encouraged my curiosity and helped me learn in any way they could. My mom took me to Juniper Library every weekend while my dad sat through countless episodes of Mythbusters, How It’s Made, and Shark Week specials. Eventually, there came a time when they could no longer answer the endless questions I would throw their way. My mom likes to remind me of one question in particular that I would ask that she was unable to form any kind of answer to. This question ended up shaping my scientific interests and became the basis for my chosen college major. The question was “why are people people?”

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05