Matching Items (15)

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Construction of GCCFG for inter-procedural optimizations in Software Managed Manycore (SMM)

Description

Software Managed Manycore (SMM) architectures - in which each core has only a scratch pad memory (instead of caches), - are a promising solution for scaling memory hierarchy to hundreds of cores. However, in these architectures, the code and data

Software Managed Manycore (SMM) architectures - in which each core has only a scratch pad memory (instead of caches), - are a promising solution for scaling memory hierarchy to hundreds of cores. However, in these architectures, the code and data of the tasks mapped to the cores must be explicitly managed in the software by the compiler. State-of-the-art compiler techniques for SMM architectures require inter-procedural information and analysis. A call graph of the program does not have enough information, and Global CFG, i.e., combining all the control flow graphs of the program has too much information, and becomes too big. As a result, most new techniques have informally defined and used GCCFG (Global Call Control Flow Graph) - a whole program representation which captures the control-flow as well as function call information in a succinct way - to perform inter-procedural analysis. However, how to construct it has not been shown yet. We find that for several simple call and control flow graphs, constructing GCCFG is relatively straightforward, but there are several cases in common applications where unique graph transformation is needed in order to formally and correctly construct the GCCFG. This paper fills this gap, and develops graph transformations to allow the construction of GCCFG in (almost) all cases. Our experiments show that by using succinct representation (GCCFG) rather than elaborate representation (GlobalCFG), the compilation time of state-of-the-art code management technique [4] can be improved by an average of 5X, and that of stack management [20] can be improved by an average of 4X.

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2014

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Chaos computing: from theory to application

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In this thesis I introduce a new direction to computing using nonlinear chaotic dynamics. The main idea is rich dynamics of a chaotic system enables us to (1) build better computers that have a flexible instruction set, and (2) carry

In this thesis I introduce a new direction to computing using nonlinear chaotic dynamics. The main idea is rich dynamics of a chaotic system enables us to (1) build better computers that have a flexible instruction set, and (2) carry out computation that conventional computers are not good at it. Here I start from the theory, explaining how one can build a computing logic block using a chaotic system, and then I introduce a new theoretical analysis for chaos computing. Specifically, I demonstrate how unstable periodic orbits and a model based on them explains and predicts how and how well a chaotic system can do computation. Furthermore, since unstable periodic orbits and their stability measures in terms of eigenvalues are extractable from experimental times series, I develop a time series technique for modeling and predicting chaos computing from a given time series of a chaotic system. After building a theoretical framework for chaos computing I proceed to architecture of these chaos-computing blocks to build a sophisticated computing system out of them. I describe how one can arrange and organize these chaos-based blocks to build a computer. I propose a brand new computer architecture using chaos computing, which shifts the limits of conventional computers by introducing flexible instruction set. Our new chaos based computer has a flexible instruction set, meaning that the user can load its desired instruction set to the computer to reconfigure the computer to be an implementation for the desired instruction set. Apart from direct application of chaos theory in generic computation, the application of chaos theory to speech processing is explained and a novel application for chaos theory in speech coding and synthesizing is introduced. More specifically it is demonstrated how a chaotic system can model the natural turbulent flow of the air in the human speech production system and how chaotic orbits can be used to excite a vocal tract model. Also as another approach to build computing system based on nonlinear system, the idea of Logical Stochastic Resonance is studied and adapted to an autoregulatory gene network in the bacteriophage λ.

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2011

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Improving CGRA utilization by enabling multi-threading for power-efficient embedded systems

Description

Performance improvements have largely followed Moore's Law due to the help from technology scaling. In order to continue improving performance, power-efficiency must be reduced. Better technology has improved power-efficiency, but this has a limit. Multi-core architectures have been shown to

Performance improvements have largely followed Moore's Law due to the help from technology scaling. In order to continue improving performance, power-efficiency must be reduced. Better technology has improved power-efficiency, but this has a limit. Multi-core architectures have been shown to be an additional aid to this crusade of increased power-efficiency. Accelerators are growing in popularity as the next means of achieving power-efficient performance. Accelerators such as Intel SSE are ideal, but prove difficult to program. FPGAs, on the other hand, are less efficient due to their fine-grained reconfigurability. A middle ground is found in CGRAs, which are highly power-efficient, but largely programmable accelerators. Power-efficiencies of 100s of GOPs/W have been estimated, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than current processors. Currently, CGRAs are limited in their applicability due to their ability to only accelerate a single thread at a time. This limitation becomes especially apparent as multi-core/multi-threaded processors have moved into the mainstream. This limitation is removed by enabling multi-threading on CGRAs through a software-oriented approach. The key capability in this solution is enabling quick run-time transformation of schedules to execute on targeted portions of the CGRA. This allows the CGRA to be shared among multiple threads simultaneously. Analysis shows that enabling multi-threading has very small costs but provides very large benefits (less than 1% single-threaded performance loss but nearly 300% CGRA throughput increase). By increasing dynamism of CGRA scheduling, system performance is shown to increase overall system performance of an optimized system by almost 350% over that of a single-threaded CGRA and nearly 20x faster than the same system with no CGRA in a highly threaded environment.

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2011

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Smart compilers for reliable and power-efficient embedded computing

Description

Thanks to continuous technology scaling, intelligent, fast and smaller digital systems are now available at affordable costs. As a result, digital systems have found use in a wide range of application areas that were not even imagined before, including medical

Thanks to continuous technology scaling, intelligent, fast and smaller digital systems are now available at affordable costs. As a result, digital systems have found use in a wide range of application areas that were not even imagined before, including medical (e.g., MRI, remote or post-operative monitoring devices, etc.), automotive (e.g., adaptive cruise control, anti-lock brakes, etc.), security systems (e.g., residential security gateways, surveillance devices, etc.), and in- and out-of-body sensing (e.g., capsule swallowed by patients measuring digestive system pH, heart monitors, etc.). Such computing systems, which are completely embedded within the application, are called embedded systems, as opposed to general purpose computing systems. In the design of such embedded systems, power consumption and reliability are indispensable system requirements. In battery operated portable devices, the battery is the single largest factor contributing to device cost, weight, recharging time, frequency and ultimately its usability. For example, in the Apple iPhone 4 smart-phone, the battery is $40\%$ of the device weight, occupies $36\%$ of its volume and allows only $7$ hours (over 3G) of talk time. As embedded systems find use in a range of sensitive applications, from bio-medical applications to safety and security systems, the reliability of the computations performed becomes a crucial factor. At our current technology-node, portable embedded systems are prone to expect failures due to soft errors at the rate of once-per-year; but with aggressive technology scaling, the rate is predicted to increase exponentially to once-per-hour. Over the years, researchers have been successful in developing techniques, implemented at different layers of the design-spectrum, to improve system power efficiency and reliability. Among the layers of design abstraction, I observe that the interface between the compiler and processor micro-architecture possesses a unique potential for efficient design optimizations. A compiler designer is able to observe and analyze the application software at a finer granularity; while the processor architect analyzes the system output (power, performance, etc.) for each executed instruction. At the compiler micro-architecture interface, if the system knowledge at the two design layers can be integrated, design optimizations at the two layers can be modified to efficiently utilize available resources and thereby achieve appreciable system-level benefits. To this effect, the thesis statement is that, ``by merging system design information at the compiler and micro-architecture design layers, smart compilers can be developed, that achieve reliable and power-efficient embedded computing through: i) Pure compiler techniques, ii) Hybrid compiler micro-architecture techniques, and iii) Compiler-aware architectures''. In this dissertation demonstrates, through contributions in each of the three compiler-based techniques, the effectiveness of smart compilers in achieving power-efficiency and reliability in embedded systems.

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2012

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STL on limited local memory (LLM) multi-core processors

Description

Limited Local Memory (LLM) multicore architectures are promising powerefficient architectures will scalable memory hierarchy. In LLM multicores, each core can access only a small local memory. Accesses to a large shared global memory can only be made explicitly through Direct

Limited Local Memory (LLM) multicore architectures are promising powerefficient architectures will scalable memory hierarchy. In LLM multicores, each core can access only a small local memory. Accesses to a large shared global memory can only be made explicitly through Direct Memory Access (DMA) operations. Standard Template Library (STL) is a powerful programming tool and is widely used for software development. STLs provide dynamic data structures, algorithms, and iterators for vector, deque (double-ended queue), list, map (red-black tree), etc. Since the size of the local memory is limited in the cores of the LLM architecture, and data transfer is not automatically supported by hardware cache or OS, the usage of current STL implementation on LLM multicores is limited. Specifically, there is a hard limitation on the amount of data they can handle. In this article, we propose and implement a framework which manages the STL container classes on the local memory of LLM multicore architecture. Our proposal removes the data size limitation of the STL, and therefore improves the programmability on LLM multicore architectures with little change to the original program. Our implementation results in only about 12%-17% increase in static library code size and reasonable runtime overheads.

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2012

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StreamWorks: an energy-efficient embedded co-processor for stream computing

Description

Stream processing has emerged as an important model of computation especially in the context of multimedia and communication sub-systems of embedded System-on-Chip (SoC) architectures. The dataflow nature of streaming applications allows them to be most naturally expressed as a set

Stream processing has emerged as an important model of computation especially in the context of multimedia and communication sub-systems of embedded System-on-Chip (SoC) architectures. The dataflow nature of streaming applications allows them to be most naturally expressed as a set of kernels iteratively operating on continuous streams of data. The kernels are computationally intensive and are mainly characterized by real-time constraints that demand high throughput and data bandwidth with limited global data reuse. Conventional architectures fail to meet these demands due to their poorly matched execution models and the overheads associated with instruction and data movements.

This work presents StreamWorks, a multi-core embedded architecture for energy-efficient stream computing. The basic processing element in the StreamWorks architecture is the StreamEngine (SE) which is responsible for iteratively executing a stream kernel. SE introduces an instruction locking mechanism that exploits the iterative nature of the kernels and enables fine-grain instruction reuse. Each instruction in a SE is locked to a Reservation Station (RS) and revitalizes itself after execution; thus never retiring from the RS. The entire kernel is hosted in RS Banks (RSBs) close to functional units for energy-efficient instruction delivery. The dataflow semantics of stream kernels are captured by a context-aware dataflow execution mode that efficiently exploits the Instruction Level Parallelism (ILP) and Data-level parallelism (DLP) within stream kernels.

Multiple SEs are grouped together to form a StreamCluster (SC) that communicate via a local interconnect. A novel software FIFO virtualization technique with split-join functionality is proposed for efficient and scalable stream communication across SEs. The proposed communication mechanism exploits the Task-level parallelism (TLP) of the stream application. The performance and scalability of the communication mechanism is evaluated against the existing data movement schemes for scratchpad based multi-core architectures. Further, overlay schemes and architectural support are proposed that allow hosting any number of kernels on the StreamWorks architecture. The proposed oevrlay schemes for code management supports kernel(context) switching for the most common use cases and can be adapted for any multi-core architecture that use software managed local memories.

The performance and energy-efficiency of the StreamWorks architecture is evaluated for stream kernel and application benchmarks by implementing the architecture in 45nm TSMC and comparison with a low power RISC core and a contemporary accelerator.

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2014

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Register file organization for coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures: compiler-microarchitecture perspective

Description

Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Architectures (CGRA) are a promising fabric for improving the performance and power-efficiency of computing devices. CGRAs are composed of components that are well-optimized to execute loops and rotating register file is an example of such a component present

Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Architectures (CGRA) are a promising fabric for improving the performance and power-efficiency of computing devices. CGRAs are composed of components that are well-optimized to execute loops and rotating register file is an example of such a component present in CGRAs. Due to the rotating nature of register indexes in rotating register file, it is very challenging, if at all possible, to hold and properly index memory addresses (pointers) and static values. In this Thesis, different structures for CGRA register files are investigated. Those structures are experimentally compared in terms of performance of mapped applications, design frequency, and area. It is shown that a register file that can logically be partitioned into rotating and non-rotating regions is an excellent choice because it imposes the minimum restriction on underlying CGRA mapping algorithm while resulting in efficient resource utilization.

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2014

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Dynamic scheduling of stream programs on embedded multi-core processors

Description

Stream computing has emerged as an importantmodel of computation for embedded system applications particularly in the multimedia and network processing domains. In recent past several programming languages and embedded multi-core processors have been proposed for streaming applications. This thesis examines

Stream computing has emerged as an importantmodel of computation for embedded system applications particularly in the multimedia and network processing domains. In recent past several programming languages and embedded multi-core processors have been proposed for streaming applications. This thesis examines the execution and dynamic scheduling of stream programs on embedded multi-core processors. The thesis addresses the problem in the context of a multi-tasking environment with a time varying allocation of processing elements for a particular streaming application. As a solution the thesis proposes a two step approach where the stream program is compiled to gather key application information, and to generate re-targetable code. A light weight dynamic scheduler incorporates the second stage of the approach. The dynamic scheduler utilizes the static information and available resources to assign or partition the application across the multi-core architecture. The objective of the dynamic scheduler is to maximize the throughput of the application, and it is sensitive to the resource (processing elements, scratch-pad memory, DMA bandwidth) constraints imposed by the target architecture. We evaluate the proposed approach by compiling and scheduling benchmark stream programs on a representative embedded multi-core processor. We present experimental results that evaluate the quality of the solutions generated by the proposed approach by comparisons with existing techniques.

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2013

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Path selection based branching for coarse grained reconfigurable arrays

Description

Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Arrays (CGRAs) are promising accelerators capable of

achieving high performance at low power consumption. While CGRAs can efficiently

accelerate loop kernels, accelerating loops with control flow (loops with if-then-else

structures) is quite challenging. Techniques that handle control flow execution in

CGRAs

Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Arrays (CGRAs) are promising accelerators capable of

achieving high performance at low power consumption. While CGRAs can efficiently

accelerate loop kernels, accelerating loops with control flow (loops with if-then-else

structures) is quite challenging. Techniques that handle control flow execution in

CGRAs generally use predication. Such techniques execute both branches of an

if-then-else structure and select outcome of either branch to commit based on the

result of the conditional. This results in poor utilization of CGRA s computational

resources. Dual-issue scheme which is the state of the art technique for control flow

fetches instructions from both paths of the branch and selects one to execute at

runtime based on the result of the conditional. This technique has an overhead in

instruction fetch bandwidth. In this thesis, to improve performance of control flow

execution in CGRAs, I propose a solution in which the result of the conditional

expression that decides the branch outcome is communicated to the instruction fetch

unit to selectively issue instructions from the path taken by the branch at run time.

Experimental results show that my solution can achieve 34.6% better performance

and 52.1% improvement in energy efficiency on an average compared to state of the

art dual issue scheme without imposing any overhead in instruction fetch bandwidth.

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Date Created
2014

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Compiler and architecture design for coarse-grained programmable accelerators

Description

The holy grail of computer hardware across all market segments has been to sustain performance improvement at the same pace as silicon technology scales. As the technology scales and the size of transistors shrinks, the power consumption and energy usage

The holy grail of computer hardware across all market segments has been to sustain performance improvement at the same pace as silicon technology scales. As the technology scales and the size of transistors shrinks, the power consumption and energy usage per transistor decrease. On the other hand, the transistor density increases significantly by technology scaling. Due to technology factors, the reduction in power consumption per transistor is not sufficient to offset the increase in power consumption per unit area. Therefore, to improve performance, increasing energy-efficiency must be addressed at all design levels from circuit level to application and algorithm levels.

At architectural level, one promising approach is to populate the system with hardware accelerators each optimized for a specific task. One drawback of hardware accelerators is that they are not programmable. Therefore, their utilization can be low as they perform one specific function. Using software programmable accelerators is an alternative approach to achieve high energy-efficiency and programmability. Due to intrinsic characteristics of software accelerators, they can exploit both instruction level parallelism and data level parallelism.

Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Architecture (CGRA) is a software programmable accelerator consists of a number of word-level functional units. Motivated by promising characteristics of software programmable accelerators, the potentials of CGRAs in future computing platforms is studied and an end-to-end CGRA research framework is developed. This framework consists of three different aspects: CGRA architectural design, integration in a computing system, and CGRA compiler. First, the design and implementation of a CGRA and its instruction set is presented. This design is then modeled in a cycle accurate system simulator. The simulation platform enables us to investigate several problems associated with a CGRA when it is deployed as an accelerator in a computing system. Next, the problem of mapping a compute intensive region of a program to CGRAs is formulated. From this formulation, several efficient algorithms are developed which effectively utilize CGRA scarce resources very well to minimize the running time of input applications. Finally, these mapping algorithms are integrated in a compiler framework to construct a compiler for CGRA

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Date Created
2015