Matching Items (35)

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A case study on the processes of academic advising in a school-centric environment

Description

This study examined the processes of academic advisement in a school-centric university environment utilizing the O'Banion Model of Academic Advising (1972) as a baseline for theoretical comparison. The primary research

This study examined the processes of academic advisement in a school-centric university environment utilizing the O'Banion Model of Academic Advising (1972) as a baseline for theoretical comparison. The primary research question sought to explore if the O'Banion Model of Academic Advising, a dominant theory of advisement processes, was still representative of and present in contemporary advisement. A qualitative case study methodology was utilized to explore the lived experiences of professional staff academic advisors in the academic advisement process. Eleven professional staff advisors were interviewed for up to 90 minutes each about their lived experience in providing academic advisement services. A structured series of questions were asked about the academic advisors' experiences with the process and their daily advisement activities. The participants were asked how the vision, mission, philosophies, and structures of the institution impacted their role and responsibilities in the advisement process. Mixed results were found over the presence of the O'Banion Model in contemporary advisement. The results revealed significant additional workloads, unique structures, and complex roles as a result of the institution's school-centric philosophy. Role ambiguity and confusion over responsibility for the advisement process were found.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Corporate mentors and undergraduate students: a qualitative study of the Advancing Women in Construction Mentorship Program

Description

In a conscious effort to combat the low enrollment of women in construction management, a program was created to retain women through a mentorship program - Advancing Women in Construction.

In a conscious effort to combat the low enrollment of women in construction management, a program was created to retain women through a mentorship program - Advancing Women in Construction. A qualitative analysis, facilitated through a grounded theory approach, sought to understand if the program was indeed successful, and what value did the students derive from the programs and participating in the mentoring process.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Faculty and Staff Perception of Their Role in Student Success

Description

ABSTRACT

Faculty and staff can create barriers by not understanding their role in student success. This study began with an artifact analysis of 20 documents to better understand how

ABSTRACT

Faculty and staff can create barriers by not understanding their role in student success. This study began with an artifact analysis of 20 documents to better understand how faculty and staff at Concordia University Texas were operationalizing student success. The results of the artifact analysis showed a lack of recorded dialogue around student success at regular business meetings, as well as pattern of deficit language approach to policy and procedure in the student handbooks Next, this study evaluated the impacts of using a Community of Practice as a change agent to help faculty and staff better understand their roles in student success and specifically to establish a definition of student success. Using a mixed method, action research approach, results showed that the Community of Practice was successful in terms of transfer or knowledge and creating a sense of purpose for participants regarding their role in student success. Results showed that participating in a Community of Practice was successful in helping faculty and staff not only understand their own role in student success, but understand their place among others in the unified goal to help students succeed. The Community of Practice participants completed the research with a better understanding of how and why collaborating with different departments enables faculty and staff to better help students. Additionally, the participants concluded that a visual reminder of student success (figurines, students stories, student pictures) ensured that student success was the first thing they thought about when completing their daily work.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Utilizing an Online Platform in Disseminating Information about Housing Renewal to Residential Students in their Second Year and Beyond

Description

Colleges and universities have goals and strategies in place to fill their on-campus housing facilities with students. At Arizona State University (ASU), the goal is to fill every bedspace on

Colleges and universities have goals and strategies in place to fill their on-campus housing facilities with students. At Arizona State University (ASU), the goal is to fill every bedspace on campus. All first-year students are expected to live on campus their first year at ASU. In Barrett, the Honors College (BHC), students are expected to live on-campus their first and second year at ASU. This study explores the BHC upperdivision communities to better understand why students are not returning to live on campus beyond the two-year live-on expectation. In this study, the researcher created a website to better inform students of the renewal process and the benefits of living on-campus. More than 200 BHC upperdivision students participated in this study through interviews and surveys. Quantitative results of the study indicated a positive and significant correlation between students who believe it costs less to live on campus, enjoy living on campus, interact with faculty and staff outside of the classroom with intent to live on campus the next academic year. Students who felt their currently living situation had a positive impact on their overall emotional/mental wellbeing, feel a sense of community or connection to others, and feel more connected because they live on campus are more likely to intend to live on campus. Students who were surveyed after the implementation of the renewal website believed it cost less to live on campus than off campus, felt that it was easier to navigate the application, and felt that they had a better understanding of the renewal process. Qualitative results of the study indicated students were deciding to live off campus due to the limited room options and the cost of on-campus housing. Students did not feel that there was a sense of community in BHC upperdivision housing, but they did feel like living on-campus was convenient and opened opportunities to get involved. The renewal website did not have an effect on students’ behavior, knowledge and intent to renew housing, and the renewal process was easy to navigate for some of the participants and difficult to navigate for the other participants.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Advancing the New American University through innovative practices in the development of Barrett, The Honors College

Description

Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University (ASU) serves as a universal role model for organizing the resources of an institution to support highly motivated and prepared students. In

Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University (ASU) serves as a universal role model for organizing the resources of an institution to support highly motivated and prepared students. In 2009, Barrett, The Honors College (Barrett) opened the nation's first purposefully designed undergraduate honors residential college campus. Given the current demand by other American higher education institutions who wish to better understand how Barrett emerged as a distinct and singular model for an honors residential college experience, this action research study explores the effectiveness of the decisions, execution and outcomes central to Barrett's development. Five senior administrators of college units or universities were interviewed and provided insight for constructing a design for how other honors programs and colleges can learn from the challenges and accomplishments presented in developing an honors college for the 21st century while replicating Barrett's success. The study is framed in the overall context of how Barrett actualizes the New American University at ASU in meeting the demand for producing students that can compete in a global marketplace.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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FaculTea: professional development for learning centered academic advising

Description

The theory of learning centered academic advising states that the purpose of advising is to teach undergraduate students about the logic and purpose of their education. Previous scholarship on learning

The theory of learning centered academic advising states that the purpose of advising is to teach undergraduate students about the logic and purpose of their education. Previous scholarship on learning centered advising has focused on the theoretical or on implementation by faculty at small colleges and universities. Methods for supporting learning centered advising in other contexts are lacking. This mixed methods, action research study investigates the efficacy of FaculTea, a professional development program designed to promote learning centered advising practices among professional academic advisors at a large state university. The study also measured frequency of learning centered advising and student perceptions of learning centered advising. Participants were 57 academic advisors in a liberal arts and sciences college at a large state university, who reported on their advising practices. In addition, the investigator interviewed four advisors, and observed them during 15 advising appointments. Also, six students were interviewed to determine their response to learning centered academic advising. Results showed the FaculTea program model was effective in promoting learning centered advising. In addition, advisors used learning centered advising to a moderate extent, depending upon the context of the appointment, the developmental level of the student, and experience level of the advisor. Student responses varied. These findings suggest learning centered advising can be incorporated into various academic advising contexts and structures and that FaculTea is an excellent model for learning centered academic advisor professional development.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Enrollment management in academic units

Description

This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management

This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management functions of recruiting, admissions, marketing, orientation, financial aid/scholarships, academic advising, student engagement, retention and career services were identified from the literature. Typically applied at the institutional level, this study provides an understanding of how leaders in academic units decide to implement enrollment management. A case study was conducted using qualitative data collection methods which emphasized interviews. Senior administrators, such as associate deans within academic units who have responsibility for enrollment management, served as the sample. Three main theoretical constructs were derived after analysis of the data: Theoretical Construct 1: To meet enrollment and retention goals, leaders strategically plan structures and manage resources for enrollment management functions in their academic units. Theoretical Construct 2: To increase retention, leaders intentionally strive to develop a sense of community through customized programs and services for students in their academic units. Theoretical Construct 3: To achieve enrollment objectives within a school-centric model, leaders build relationships with centralized enrollment management functions and other academic units. The discussion and analysis of the study suggests that academic units follow a similar evolutionary model to institutions as they develop enrollment management functions. Five recommendations on how leaders in academic units can more strategically utilize enrollment management principles in decision making are offered.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Health professions advisors: perceptions of the health professions advising community regarding factors important to the selection of students for medical school

Description

This study determined if differences exist among the health professions advising community between factors (academic and non-academic) used as selection criteria in medical school admissions, as well as the impact

This study determined if differences exist among the health professions advising community between factors (academic and non-academic) used as selection criteria in medical school admissions, as well as the impact of the holistic review in admissions on new admissions initiatives with respect to personal and professional backgrounds of advisors. The study examined the differences based on the gender, race and ethnicity, age, years of advising experience, institution size and type, classification and region of the population. Statistical analyses were conducted using comparison of means tests: one-sample t-tests and one-way ANOVA to determine the significance of differences for each of the variables. Significant differences were found to exist among the health professions advising community based on gender, race and ethnicity, institution type, classification of appointment, institution size and type. The findings of the study suggested that the personal and professional background of a health professions advisor did impact the perception of importance among the academic and non-academic factors used in the selection of medical students. The medical school admissions community should appreciate the unique viewpoints of the broader health professions advising community when building relationships and finding opportunities to collaborate.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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First-generation strength: supporting first-generation college students in study abroad

Description

First-generation college students are an underrepresented group in terms of study

abroad participation nationally and at Arizona State University (ASU). The ASU and

International Studies Abroad (ISA) Planning Scholars Scholarship Program was

developed

First-generation college students are an underrepresented group in terms of study

abroad participation nationally and at Arizona State University (ASU). The ASU and

International Studies Abroad (ISA) Planning Scholars Scholarship Program was

developed to support first-generation college students in their pursuit of study abroad.

This mixed-methods study examined what the specific needs of first-generation college

students are as they pursue study abroad experiences and what effect the ASU and ISA

Planning Scholars Program had on them. A combination of surveys, semi-structured

interviews, and a photovoice project provided data for the study. Key findings included

that first-generation college students had concerns about finances, finding a study abroad

program that would keep them on track for graduation, making friends while they study

abroad, and traveling abroad alone. The study indicated that the Planning Scholars

program did increase students’ confidence in pursuing study abroad. Additionally, the

theory of First-Generation Strength was developed which suggests that first-generation

college students possess certain strengths and capital that help them overcome a variety

of new obstacles and make them an ideal candidate for study abroad due to their

experiences with having to navigate new contexts, such as going to college,

independently.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Dissertation influences and processes: Ed.D. vs. A.B.D

Description

ABSTRACT

This study identified the influences and processes of the dissertation completers, currently enrolled students, and non-completers of four cohorts (59 participants) in the Ed.D. administration program.

ABSTRACT

This study identified the influences and processes of the dissertation completers, currently enrolled students, and non-completers of four cohorts (59 participants) in the Ed.D. administration program. The research questions sought answers as to why some students completed their dissertations and why some did not, the processes in completing a dissertation, and what should be included in a doctoral guide for completing the dissertation. The participants of this study were Ed.D. administration doctoral students in the field of educational leadership from a southwestern university. The job titles of the participants ranged from teacher to superintendent. The participants started the three-year doctoral program in the years 2004, 2005, 2006, or 2007. They were between the ages of 24 and 63. Survey Monkey provided the opportunity to request answers to different questions depending on the dissertation status—enrollee, completer, or non-completer.

This study entailed interviewing seven doctoral completers, five enrollees, and four non

completers. The significance of this mixed method study was to compare influences and

processes to determine suggestions for a study guide that could be used by future doctoral students, chairs, programs, and universities to help students complete their dissertations and become successful graduates. Recommendations are made (a) to recruit more African Americans and men into doctoral programs and the education field; (b) non-completers be invited to finish their dissertations with interventions and an accountable chair; (c) chairs provide his or her best help to meet the student half-way; (d) the department and university provide accountability measures and incentives for both the student and the chair; and (e) provide specific lessons that include finding a topic, researching a topic, and interacting with the chair; and (f) it was determined that non-completers were not timid as suggested in the literature but were found to have either changed their desire or fulfilled their desire by obtaining a promotion. In summary, a nurturing chair and a strong support system were found to be two major factors in determining the difference between doctoral completion and non-completion.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015