Matching Items (21)

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Answering deep queries specified in natural language with respect to a frame based knowledge base and developing related natural language understanding components

Description

Question Answering has been under active research for decades, but it has recently taken the spotlight following IBM Watson's success in Jeopardy! and digital assistants such as Apple's Siri, Google Now, and Microsoft Cortana through every smart-phone and browser. However,

Question Answering has been under active research for decades, but it has recently taken the spotlight following IBM Watson's success in Jeopardy! and digital assistants such as Apple's Siri, Google Now, and Microsoft Cortana through every smart-phone and browser. However, most of the research in Question Answering aims at factual questions rather than deep ones such as ``How'' and ``Why'' questions.

In this dissertation, I suggest a different approach in tackling this problem. We believe that the answers of deep questions need to be formally defined before found.

Because these answers must be defined based on something, it is better to be more structural in natural language text; I define Knowledge Description Graphs (KDGs), a graphical structure containing information about events, entities, and classes. We then propose formulations and algorithms to construct KDGs from a frame-based knowledge base, define the answers of various ``How'' and ``Why'' questions with respect to KDGs, and suggest how to obtain the answers from KDGs using Answer Set Programming. Moreover, I discuss how to derive missing information in constructing KDGs when the knowledge base is under-specified and how to answer many factual question types with respect to the knowledge base.

After having the answers of various questions with respect to a knowledge base, I extend our research to use natural language text in specifying deep questions and knowledge base, generate natural language text from those specification. Toward these goals, I developed NL2KR, a system which helps in translating natural language to formal language. I show NL2KR's use in translating ``How'' and ``Why'' questions, and generating simple natural language sentences from natural language KDG specification. Finally, I discuss applications of the components I developed in Natural Language Understanding.

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Date Created
2015

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Advancing biomedical named entity recognition with multivariate feature selection and semantically motivated features

Description

Automating aspects of biocuration through biomedical information extraction could significantly impact biomedical research by enabling greater biocuration throughput and improving the feasibility of a wider scope. An important step in biomedical information extraction systems is named entity recognition (NER), where

Automating aspects of biocuration through biomedical information extraction could significantly impact biomedical research by enabling greater biocuration throughput and improving the feasibility of a wider scope. An important step in biomedical information extraction systems is named entity recognition (NER), where mentions of entities such as proteins and diseases are located within natural-language text and their semantic type is determined. This step is critical for later tasks in an information extraction pipeline, including normalization and relationship extraction. BANNER is a benchmark biomedical NER system using linear-chain conditional random fields and the rich feature set approach. A case study with BANNER locating genes and proteins in biomedical literature is described. The first corpus for disease NER adequate for use as training data is introduced, and employed in a case study of disease NER. The first corpus locating adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in user posts to a health-related social website is also described, and a system to locate and identify ADRs in social media text is created and evaluated. The rich feature set approach to creating NER feature sets is argued to be subject to diminishing returns, implying that additional improvements may require more sophisticated methods for creating the feature set. This motivates the first application of multivariate feature selection with filters and false discovery rate analysis to biomedical NER, resulting in a feature set at least 3 orders of magnitude smaller than the set created by the rich feature set approach. Finally, two novel approaches to NER by modeling the semantics of token sequences are introduced. The first method focuses on the sequence content by using language models to determine whether a sequence resembles entries in a lexicon of entity names or text from an unlabeled corpus more closely. The second method models the distributional semantics of token sequences, determining the similarity between a potential mention and the token sequences from the training data by analyzing the contexts where each sequence appears in a large unlabeled corpus. The second method is shown to improve the performance of BANNER on multiple data sets.

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Date Created
2013

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Robust implementation of NL2KR system and it's application in iRODS domain

Description

Currently, to interact with computer based systems one needs to learn the specific interface language of that system. In most cases, interaction would be much easier if it could be done in natural language. For that, we will need a

Currently, to interact with computer based systems one needs to learn the specific interface language of that system. In most cases, interaction would be much easier if it could be done in natural language. For that, we will need a module which understands natural language and automatically translates it to the interface language of the system. NL2KR (Natural language to knowledge representation) v.1 system is a prototype of such a system. It is a learning based system that learns new meanings of words in terms of lambda-calculus formulas given an initial lexicon of some words and their meanings and a training corpus of sentences with their translations. As a part of this thesis, we take the prototype NL2KR v.1 system and enhance various components of it to make it usable for somewhat substantial and useful interface languages. We revamped the lexicon learning components, Inverse-lambda and Generalization modules, and redesigned the lexicon learning algorithm which uses these components to learn new meanings of words. Similarly, we re-developed an inbuilt parser of the system in Answer Set Programming (ASP) and also integrated external parser with the system. Apart from this, we added some new rich features like various system configurations and memory cache in the learning component of the NL2KR system. These enhancements helped in learning more meanings of the words, boosted performance of the system by reducing the computation time by a factor of 8 and improved the usability of the system. We evaluated the NL2KR system on iRODS domain. iRODS is a rule-oriented data system, which helps in managing large set of computer files using policies. This system provides a Rule-Oriented interface langauge whose syntactic structure is like any procedural programming language (eg. C). However, direct translation of natural language (NL) to this interface language is difficult. So, for automatic translation of NL to this language, we define a simple intermediate Policy Declarative Language (IPDL) to represent the knowledge in the policies, which then can be directly translated to iRODS rules. We develop a corpus of 100 policy statements and manually translate them to IPDL langauge. This corpus is then used for the evaluation of NL2KR system. We performed 10 fold cross validation on the system. Furthermore, using this corpus, we illustrate how different components of our NL2KR system work.

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Date Created
2013

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An inverse lambda calculus algorithm for natural language processing

Description

Natural Language Processing is a subject that combines computer science and linguistics, aiming to provide computers with the ability to understand natural language and to develop a more intuitive human-computer interaction. The research community has developed ways to translate natural

Natural Language Processing is a subject that combines computer science and linguistics, aiming to provide computers with the ability to understand natural language and to develop a more intuitive human-computer interaction. The research community has developed ways to translate natural language to mathematical formalisms. It has not yet been shown, however, how to automatically translate different kinds of knowledge in English to distinct formal languages. Most of the recent work presents the problem that the translation method aims to a specific formal language or is hard to generalize. In this research, I take a first step to overcome this difficulty and present two algorithms which take as input two lambda-calculus expressions G and H and compute a lambda-calculus expression F. The expression F returned by the first algorithm satisfies F@G=H and, in the case of the second algorithm, we obtain G@F=H. The lambda expressions represent the meanings of words and sentences. For each formal language that one desires to use with the algorithms, the language must be defined in terms of lambda calculus. Also, some additional concepts must be included. After doing this, given a sentence, its representation and knowing the representation of several words in the sentence, the algorithms can be used to obtain the representation of the other words in that sentence. In this work, I define two languages and show examples of their use with the algorithms. The algorithms are illustrated along with soundness and completeness proofs, the latter with respect to typed lambda-calculus formulas up to the second order. These algorithms are a core part of a natural language semantics system that translates sentences from English to formulas in different formal languages.

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Date Created
2010

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An intelligent co-reference resolver for Winograd schema sentences containing resolved semantic entities

Description

There has been a lot of research in the field of artificial intelligence about thinking machines. Alan Turing proposed a test to observe a machine's intelligent behaviour with respect to natural language conversation. The Winograd schema challenge is suggested as

There has been a lot of research in the field of artificial intelligence about thinking machines. Alan Turing proposed a test to observe a machine's intelligent behaviour with respect to natural language conversation. The Winograd schema challenge is suggested as an alternative, to the Turing test. It needs inferencing capabilities, reasoning abilities and background knowledge to get the answer right. It involves a coreference resolution task in which a machine is given a sentence containing a situation which involves two entities, one pronoun and some more information about the situation and the machine has to come up with the right resolution of a pronoun to one of the entities. The complexity of the task is increased with the fact that the Winograd sentences are not constrained by one domain or specific sentence structure and it also contains a lot of human proper names. This modification makes the task of association of entities, to one particular word in the sentence, to derive the answer, difficult. I have developed a pronoun resolver system for the confined domain Winograd sentences. I have developed a classifier or filter which takes input sentences and decides to accept or reject them based on a particular criteria. Once the sentence is accepted. I run parsers on it to obtain the detailed analysis. Furthermore I have developed four answering modules which use world knowledge and inferencing mechanisms to try and resolve the pronoun. The four techniques I use are : ConceptNet knowledgebase, Search engine pattern counts,Narrative event chains and sentiment analysis. I have developed a particular aggregation mechanism for the answers from these modules to arrive at a final answer. I have used caching technique for the association relations that I obtain for different modules, so as to boost the performance. I run my system on the standard ‘nyu dataset’ of Winograd sentences and questions. This dataset is then restricted, by my classifier, to 90 sentences. I evaluate my system on this 90 sentence dataset. When I compare my results against the state of the art system on the same dataset, I get nearly 4.5 % improvement in the restricted domain.

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Date Created
2013

Solving Winograd Schema Challenge: using semantic parsing, automatic knowledge acquisition and logical reasoning

Description

Turing test has been a benchmark scale for measuring the human level intelligence in computers since it was proposed by Alan Turing in 1950. However, for last 60 years, the applications such as ELIZA, PARRY, Cleverbot and Eugene Goostman, that

Turing test has been a benchmark scale for measuring the human level intelligence in computers since it was proposed by Alan Turing in 1950. However, for last 60 years, the applications such as ELIZA, PARRY, Cleverbot and Eugene Goostman, that claimed to pass the test. These applications are either based on tricks to fool humans on a textual chat based test or there has been a disagreement between AI communities on them passing the test. This has led to the school of thought that it might not be the ideal test for predicting the human level intelligence in machines.

Consequently, the Winograd Schema Challenge has been suggested as an alternative to the Turing test. As opposed to deciding the intelligent behavior with the help of chat servers, like it was done in the Turing test, the Winograd Schema Challenge is a question answering test. It consists of sentence and question pairs such that the answer to the question depends on the resolution of a definite pronoun or adjective in the sentence. The answers are fairly intuitive for humans but they are difficult for machines because it requires some sort of background or commonsense knowledge about the sentence.

In this thesis, I propose a novel technique to solve the Winograd Schema Challenge. The technique has three basic modules at its disposal, namely, a Semantic Parser that parses the English text (both sentences and questions) into a formal representation, an Automatic Background Knowledge Extractor that extracts the Background Knowledge pertaining to the given Winograd sentence, and an Answer Set Programming Reasoning Engine that reasons on the given Winograd sentence and the corresponding Background Knowledge. The applicability of the technique is illustrated by solving a subset of Winograd Schema Challenge pertaining to a certain type of Background Knowledge. The technique is evaluated on the subset and a notable accuracy is achieved.

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Date Created
2014

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A semantic triplet based story classifier

Description

Text classification, in the artificial intelligence domain, is an activity in which text documents are automatically classified into predefined categories using machine learning techniques. An example of this is classifying uncategorized news articles into different predefined categories such as "Business",

Text classification, in the artificial intelligence domain, is an activity in which text documents are automatically classified into predefined categories using machine learning techniques. An example of this is classifying uncategorized news articles into different predefined categories such as "Business", "Politics", "Education", "Technology" , etc. In this thesis, supervised machine learning approach is followed, in which a module is first trained with pre-classified training data and then class of test data is predicted. Good feature extraction is an important step in the machine learning approach and hence the main component of this text classifier is semantic triplet based features in addition to traditional features like standard keyword based features and statistical features based on shallow-parsing (such as density of POS tags and named entities). Triplet {Subject, Verb, Object} in a sentence is defined as a relation between subject and object, the relation being the predicate (verb). Triplet extraction process, is a 5 step process which takes input corpus as a web text document(s), each consisting of one or many paragraphs, from RSS feeds to lists of extremist website. Input corpus feeds into the "Pronoun Resolution" step, which uses an heuristic approach to identify the noun phrases referenced by the pronouns. The next step "SRL Parser" is a shallow semantic parser and converts the incoming pronoun resolved paragraphs into annotated predicate argument format. The output of SRL parser is processed by "Triplet Extractor" algorithm which forms the triplet in the form {Subject, Verb, Object}. Generalization and reduction of triplet features is the next step. Reduced feature representation reduces computing time, yields better discriminatory behavior and handles curse of dimensionality phenomena. For training and testing, a ten- fold cross validation approach is followed. In each round SVM classifier is trained with 90% of labeled (training) data and in the testing phase, classes of remaining 10% unlabeled (testing) data are predicted. Concluding, this paper proposes a model with semantic triplet based features for story classification. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated against other traditional features used in the literature for text classification tasks.

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2013

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Story detection using generalized concepts

Description

A major challenge in automated text analysis is that different words are used for related concepts. Analyzing text at the surface level would treat related concepts (i.e. actors, actions, targets, and victims) as different objects, potentially missing common narrative patterns.

A major challenge in automated text analysis is that different words are used for related concepts. Analyzing text at the surface level would treat related concepts (i.e. actors, actions, targets, and victims) as different objects, potentially missing common narrative patterns. Generalized concepts are used to overcome this problem. Generalization may result into word sense disambiguation failing to find similarity. This is addressed by taking into account contextual synonyms. Concept discovery based on contextual synonyms reveal information about the semantic roles of the words leading to concepts. Merger engine generalize the concepts so that it can be used as features in learning algorithms.

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Date Created
2015

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A high level language for human robot interaction

Description

While developing autonomous intelligent robots has been the goal of many research programs, a more practical application involving intelligent robots is the formation of teams consisting of both humans and robots. An example of such an application is search and

While developing autonomous intelligent robots has been the goal of many research programs, a more practical application involving intelligent robots is the formation of teams consisting of both humans and robots. An example of such an application is search and rescue operations where robots commanded by humans are sent to environments too dangerous for humans. For such human-robot interaction, natural language is considered a good communication medium as it allows humans with less training about the robot's internal language to be able to command and interact with the robot. However, any natural language communication from the human needs to be translated to a formal language that the robot can understand. Similarly, before the robot can communicate (in natural language) with the human, it needs to formulate its communique in some formal language which then gets translated into natural language. In this paper, I develop a high level language for communication between humans and robots and demonstrate various aspects through a robotics simulation. These language constructs borrow some ideas from action execution languages and are grounded with respect to simulated human-robot interaction transcripts.

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Date Created
2012

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Context-aware adaptive hybrid semantic relatedness in biomedical science

Description

Text mining of biomedical literature and clinical notes is a very active field of research in biomedical science. Semantic analysis is one of the core modules for different Natural Language Processing (NLP) solutions. Methods for calculating semantic relatedness of two

Text mining of biomedical literature and clinical notes is a very active field of research in biomedical science. Semantic analysis is one of the core modules for different Natural Language Processing (NLP) solutions. Methods for calculating semantic relatedness of two concepts can be very useful in solutions solving different problems such as relationship extraction, ontology creation and question / answering [1–6]. Several techniques exist in calculating semantic relatedness of two concepts. These techniques utilize different knowledge sources and corpora. So far, researchers attempted to find the best hybrid method for each domain by combining semantic relatedness techniques and data sources manually. In this work, attempts were made to eliminate the needs for manually combining semantic relatedness methods targeting any new contexts or resources through proposing an automated method, which attempted to find the best combination of semantic relatedness techniques and resources to achieve the best semantic relatedness score in every context. This may help the research community find the best hybrid method for each context considering the available algorithms and resources.

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Date Created
2016