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Governments in Transition: The People's Voice

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Amidst transition are the citizens living and forging identity. This thesis is divided into three portions including Scotland, the Czech Republic, and Taiwan. Each section includes a history, literature, and interview investigation.
The analysis of Scotland includes the examination of

Amidst transition are the citizens living and forging identity. This thesis is divided into three portions including Scotland, the Czech Republic, and Taiwan. Each section includes a history, literature, and interview investigation.
The analysis of Scotland includes the examination of identity as a consequence of Scottish history, the Scottish Referendum, and the Brexit Referendum. National identity is explored through literature and through the analysis of Dr. Neal McGarvey, a Scottish Economic Councilman, and Arizona State University exchange student Scott Fyfe. Scotland expressed strong political activism realized through their political participation and open discussions. Yet, their ability to demand change is hindered by the United Kingdom and will continue to be unless drastic changes occur.
The analysis of the Czech Republic includes Czech history from World War II through the Prague Spring, the Velvet Revolution, the split of Czechoslovakia, and the current Communist party. National identity defined by literature is observed in conjunction with interviews of Lukáš Rumian, an Arizona State University exchange student, the Čižmár family with a unique military background and split support for Communism, an anonymous family with multigenerational viewpoints, and lastly, a former refugee with strong opinions on immigration and cultural preservation. The findings of the Czech Republic are of an apathetic country with few avenues for political discussion or education. The generations face massive difference in their mindsets as they continue to be influenced by their Communist past.
The examination of Taiwanese independence includes a look at centuries of domination, the Chinese Kuomintang party, and the Sunflower Revolution. National identity highlighted through literature is paired with the interviews of Kun Baba, a Taiwanese orchard owner, an anonymous set of a college student, his girlfriend, and his father, and a Taiwanese aboriginal who openly explores the “bullying” of China. Findings of Taiwan establish a growing sense of Taiwanese identity and an outward-looking approach to preserving their independence from China.
These three countries each shared a desire to forge their futures yet took different approaches. Scotland being vocal but limited by government. The Czech Republic apathetic, yet citizens take advantage of democratic freedoms. Taiwan is creating political stances through elections, yet is finding these stances to be inadequate in securing a future of continued independence. Thus they search for international assistance. In each country, I realized the importance global citizenship has in promoting political discussions in a quest to understand the needs and desires of citizens internationally. With a deepened understanding of a nation’s political climate, global citizens can help citizens voice their opinion, increase literature of citizen opinion, receive government recognition, and secure the change they desire.
Note: The interview participants range from college students to retirees, ages 17-78. Many asked for anonymous reporting to protect their identity and employment status.

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2018-05

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An American in Scotland: An Examination of What it Means to Be a Tourist, a Traveler, and a Student in a Foreign Country

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This paper is an examination of my own personal experience living and studying abroad in Scotland and how this experience relates to the concept of tourist versus traveler. The concept of tourist versus traveler is found in many different work

This paper is an examination of my own personal experience living and studying abroad in Scotland and how this experience relates to the concept of tourist versus traveler. The concept of tourist versus traveler is found in many different work of travel writing. Paul Fussell described the tourist versus traveler idea best. Travelers, according to Fussell, "learn not just foreign customs and curious cuisines and unfamiliar beliefs and novel forms of government, they learn, if they are lucky, humility." The aim of this project is to look at the differences between a tourist and a traveler is reference to my own personal experiences studying abroad. After spending a semester living and studying in Scotland I noticed that my behavior had changed, becoming more likely to try new things and immerse myself in Scottish society, instead of seeing the important historical places. I spent five months living in Scotland and during this time I noticed that the more time I spent abroad the less I wanted to do the tourist traps and the more I wanted experience Scotland through the parts of the country most generally would not see. My paper moves from my experience as a tourist to later in the semester when I had been living there for a while. This work can also be used to examine what living and studying abroad is like for students. Different countries have different ways of handling education and this work can help highlight these differences.

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2016-05

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Tuberculosis, social inequality, and the hospital in nineteenth-century Scotland

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Medical practice surrounding tuberculosis (TB) treatment in two nineteenth-century Scottish charitable hospitals reveals that in developing empirically-positioned constructs of this and related diseases, medical practitioners drew upon social assumptions about women and the working classes, thus reinforcing rather than shedding

Medical practice surrounding tuberculosis (TB) treatment in two nineteenth-century Scottish charitable hospitals reveals that in developing empirically-positioned constructs of this and related diseases, medical practitioners drew upon social assumptions about women and the working classes, thus reinforcing rather than shedding cultural notions of who becomes ill and why. TB is a social disease, its distribution determined by relationships among human groups; primary among these is the patient-practitioner relationship, owing to the social role of medical treatment in restoring the ill to both health and society. To clarify the influence of cultural context upon the evolution of medical constructs of TB, I examined Glasgow Royal Infirmary (GRI) and Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh (RIE) ward journals, admissions registers, and institution management records from 1794 through 1905. Medical practice at the turn of the nineteenth century was dominated by observation and questioning of the patient, concordant with conceptions of physicians' labor as mental rather than physical. This changed with the introduction of the stethoscope in the 1820s, which together with the dissection of the poor allowed by the 1832 Anatomy Act ushered in disease concepts emphasizing pathological anatomy. Relationships between patient and practitioner also altered at this time, exhibiting distrust and medical dominance. The mid-Victorian era was notable for clinicians' increasing interest in immorality's contributions to ill health, absent in earlier practice and linked to conceptions of women and the working classes as inherently pathological. In 1882, discovery of the tubercle bacillus challenged existing nutritional, hereditary, and environmental explanations for TB. Although practitioners utilized bacteriological methods, this discovery did not revolutionize diagnosis or treatment. Rather, these older models were incorporated with perceived behavioral, environmental, and biological degradation of the working classes, rendering marginalized groups "soil" prepared for the "seeds" of disease -- at risk, but also to blame. This framework, in which marginalized groups contribute to their increased risk for disease through refusal to accord with hegemonically-established "healthy" behavior, persists. As a result, meaningful change in TB rates will need to address these longstanding contributions of social inequality to Western medical treatment.

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2013

ROB ROY AND THE EXPLORATION OF CULTURAL IDENTITY: THE SOCIOPOLITICAL RELATIONSHIP OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND ACCORDING TO SIR WALTER SCOTT

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The interaction between England and Scotland is complicated and continually changing. Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott examines this long-standing relationship through his various writings. Scott conveys a presence that is both acutely aware of the damages enacted upon Scotland by

The interaction between England and Scotland is complicated and continually changing. Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott examines this long-standing relationship through his various writings. Scott conveys a presence that is both acutely aware of the damages enacted upon Scotland by various English political efforts, and sensitive to the delicate relationship that the two regions had begun to form during his lifetime. Through a critical analysis of Scott's novel, Rob Roy, one can see the various strategies Scott used to balance the need to address prior controversies within the relationship, and the petition to move beyond the prior conflict and develop a mutual understanding of each culture. Through this, Scott is able to regenerate a sense of Scottish nationalism for his people, and encourage improved relations within the British Isles.

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2013-05