Matching Items (3)

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Room & Cardboard

Description

Utilizing ASU’s cardboard waste to build furniture products for students living in residence halls will assist in solving multiple problems for students, the university and the environment. Our business will

Utilizing ASU’s cardboard waste to build furniture products for students living in residence halls will assist in solving multiple problems for students, the university and the environment. Our business will alleviate the problems of excessive cardboard waste in the dumpsters, the lack of certain furniture items which are not provided by the residence halls at move-in, and ultimately address the lack of low-cost, up-cycled furniture products on the market.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

Quality versus Quantity and the Role of the Designer in the Manufacturing Process

Description

Modern manufacturing has allowed society to make giant leaps and bounds within the sphere of building. But how much are we sacrificing for this to occur? There is a fine

Modern manufacturing has allowed society to make giant leaps and bounds within the sphere of building. But how much are we sacrificing for this to occur? There is a fine line between a quality product and its counterpart- the quantity product. Who is responsible for maintaining this balance? How can we ensure that the responsible parties are aware of how something will be produced? Designers must be educated in manufacturing processes so that they can act as a quality control buffer and make informed decisions about the product specified. The responsibility of maintaining a balance between quality and quantity (or cost) is a joint one. In some cases, it may fall on the craftsman, who pushes out more product in order to compete in the market today. In others, it may be on the manufacturer, who uses particular methods of building in order to ensure a quality product. However, in most scenarios, furniture is produced to spec, per the intent of a designer. Whether the craftsman or the manufacturer makes the product, some sort of design minded person is behind the order and has the final say on how a piece that they have commissioned will look. A purchase order is issued to a manufacturer or craftsman based on a provided quote. Shop drawings are reviewed by a designer to ensure that the proper materials are used, the proper dimensions are met, and that the aesthetic of the piece matches the designer's vision. In recognizing that a portion of responsibility for the manufacture of product falls onto the designer, who submits a specification to a manufacturer, and approves or denies shop drawings, we can recognize a missing piece of their fundamental education. Newly graduated designers lack basic knowledge about the way things that are used every day are built, how they want them built, and what materials are used to build them. Extensive engineering and labor processes are required to fabricate products; processes that a designer may know nothing about, thereby forfeiting their involvement in quality control. This first section of this paper will strive to address issues of quality versus quantity, and the role of the designer in maintaining a balance between the two. In addition, it will focus on implementing methods to educate designers on manufacturing techniques, essentially creating a quality control mechanism in terms of furniture specification. The second section will consist of a developing course outline addressing the basic knowledge and application of manufacturing techniques for interior designers.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Furniture longevity: how mass-produced heirloom furniture supports sustainable consumption

Description

In recent years, the length of time people use and keep belongings has decreased. With the acceptance of short-lived furniture and inexpensive replacements, the American mentality has shifted to thinking

In recent years, the length of time people use and keep belongings has decreased. With the acceptance of short-lived furniture and inexpensive replacements, the American mentality has shifted to thinking that discarding furniture is normal, often in the guise of recycling. Americans are addicted to landfills. The high cost of landfill real estate and other considerable ecological impacts created by the manufacturing of furniture should persuade people to give their belongings a longer life, but in reality, furniture is often prematurely discarded. This grounded theory study takes a multi-method approach to analyze why some types of furniture are kept longer and to theorize about new ways to design and sell furniture that lasts well past its warranty. Case studies bring new insight into designer intention, manufacturer intent, the world of auction-worthy collectables and heirlooms, why there is a booming second-hand furniture market and the growing importance of informed interior designers and architects who specify or help clients choose interior furnishings. An environmental life cycle assessment compares how the length of furniture life affects environmental impacts. A product's life could continue for generations if properly maintained. Designers and manufacturers hoping to promote longevity can apply the conclusions of this report in bringing new pieces to the market that have a much longer life span. This study finds areas of opportunity that promote user attachment, anticipate future repurposing, and provide services. This thinking envisions a paradigm for furniture that can re-invent itself over multiple generations of users, and ultimately lead to a new wave of desirable heirloom furniture.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011