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Arizona Nurses Association Member Involvement in Public Policy

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The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits. A 20- item survey was sent to all of the members of AzNA. There were 39 responses used in the analysis. The highest reported public policy activities in which the nurses had participated were: voted (90%), contacted a public official (51%), and gave money to a campaign or for a public policy concern (46%). Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to involvement and improving the health of the public was the most frequently reported benefit to involvement. The number of public policy education/information sources and the highest level of education positively correlate to the nurses' total number of public policy activities (r = .627 p <0.05; r = .504, p <0.05). Based on the results of stepwise linear regression analysis, the participants' age, number of education/information sources, and efficacy expectation predict 68.8% of involvement in public policy activities. The greater the number of education/information sources, the greater the number of public policy activities nurses report having participated in.

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2015-12

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Bringing Visibility to Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A Needs Assessment to Inform Camp Programming

Description

Sickle cell disease is a genetic hemoglobinopathy resulting in chronic and daily pain, risk of serious sequelae, and altered activities of daily living. Resources dedicated to helping individuals with sickle cell disease are lacking, especially compared to other chronic diseases.

Sickle cell disease is a genetic hemoglobinopathy resulting in chronic and daily pain, risk of serious sequelae, and altered activities of daily living. Resources dedicated to helping individuals with sickle cell disease are lacking, especially compared to other chronic diseases. Children with sickle cell disease experience school absence, fractured peer relationships, frequent healthcare visits, stigma, and feelings of isolation. Additionally, chronic pain decreases developmentally important play and physical activity in these children. The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) project is to conduct a needs assessment to inform sickle cell disease family camp programming in southern Arizona. Once a camp experience can be safely implemented, the effects of a camp experience on knowledge, empowerment, and disease management in children with sickle cell disease will be investigated. Research specific to camps for children suffering from sickle cell disease is lacking, however ample evidence suggests the benefit of disease specific camps. Medical specialty camps provide an opportunity for children and families to normalize their condition, participate in activities, and form peer relationships in an environment that safely accommodates their unique needs. This has led to the initiation of an evidence-based project to develop a needs assessment for families affected by sickle cell disease and community partners to inform camp activity development guided by Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Framework for Program Evaluation.

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2021-04-23

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Pediatric Weight Management: Provider Needs Assessment to Improve Care for Military Dependents

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Background/Purpose: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the pediatric population is a global epidemic. Rapid weight gain in early childhood exacerbates risk factors for obesity, chronic disease in adulthood, and disqualifies 31% of American youth from serving in the

Background/Purpose: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the pediatric population is a global epidemic. Rapid weight gain in early childhood exacerbates risk factors for obesity, chronic disease in adulthood, and disqualifies 31% of American youth from serving in the Armed Forces. Although the pediatric dependents weight crisis reflects the national dilemma, there are inconsistencies in provider knowledge, limited access to evidence-based, weight management intervention, and treatment options. This paper will assess provider needs, identify opportunity to improve practice, and process used in weight management in the clinic.
Method: Eight military and four civilian pediatric and family practice providers completed a 16-item needs assessment survey. The survey was distributed via email using an online survey tool, and a printed version was provided to those who had not completed it online. Data was collected over 8 weeks and a descriptive analysis of content was done using the Intellectus software.
Results: Although the response rate was 88.9%, it was lower than anticipated due to COVID-19 related military deployments. Descriptive data were obtained on a variety of provider needs and practices. Results provided valuable information on current attitudes of providers. Providers demonstrated a significant need for a multidisciplinary support team including a dietician and more time dedicated to weight management at office visits. At least 50% of providers have had motivational interviewing training and report that they apply these techniques as part of an intervention in patient’s weight management care.
Implication: Data supports overweight and obesity care practice changes in the clinic. Areas identified by providers included the need for further training and clinic management support including the availability of a pediatric dietician added to the healthcare team.

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2021-04-27

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Rural Childhood Cancer in Arizona: A Needs Assessment

Description

Childhood cancer affects nearly eleven-thousand children under the age of fifteen years each year, which launches families into a treatment trajectory of unforeseen complexities in several domains. As pediatric oncology healthcare providers tailor family-centered care for these highly fragile children,

Childhood cancer affects nearly eleven-thousand children under the age of fifteen years each year, which launches families into a treatment trajectory of unforeseen complexities in several domains. As pediatric oncology healthcare providers tailor family-centered care for these highly fragile children, it is vital to understand the family’s lifestyle and available community resources. Children residing in remote areas may experience more burdensome needs as they progress in the cancer treatment trajectory, which healthcare providers may not be aware of unless the information is specifically solicited or incidentally discovered. Use of an evidence-based needs assessment for families who reside in remote zip codes will aid in identification of unique needs and assist the multi-disciplinary care team to specifically tailor interventions to the family. Forty semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of childhood cancer survivors using an expert-validated needs assessment tool. The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) project is to develop a needs assessment for children with cancer in order to identify which needs are amplified in a remote community in order to match and create resources to meet those needs.

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2021-04-30