Matching Items (10)

135294-Thumbnail Image.png

Creating Immersion through Storytelling in Theme Parks, Museums, and Virtual Environments

Description

Storytelling is innately human, and research has shown it has the powerful ability to "transport" people into a narrative. Literature on the topic of immersion discusses how technology form perceptual

Storytelling is innately human, and research has shown it has the powerful ability to "transport" people into a narrative. Literature on the topic of immersion discusses how technology form perceptual illusions to make a user feel detached from reality and create an impactful escapist experience. By examining and synthesizing relevant literature, key methods of storytelling used in theme parks, museums, and virtual environments that are used to deepen immersive experiences were identified. A model of the demonstrated techniques and methods for facilitating immersion through storytelling in these varying contexts has been created to suggest that these methods can be applied to other settings to foster a richer experience for users and guests.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

133765-Thumbnail Image.png

Rewriting the Narrative: A Discussion of Alzheimer's, the Arts, and Identity

Description

Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are a growing issue in the United States. While medical experts try to develop treatments or a cure, what are we as a society to

Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are a growing issue in the United States. While medical experts try to develop treatments or a cure, what are we as a society to do in the meantime to help those living with Alzheimer's? The arts seem to be an answer. In this thesis, I highlight numerous programs already in place across the United States that utilize the visual, musical, and dramatic arts to give people with Alzheimer's an avenue for expression, a connection to the world around them, as well as a better quality of life. I address the largely positive impact these arts engagement programs have on caregivers and their perceptions of their loved ones. I discuss what it means to have narrative identity and personhood in the midst of a disease that appears to strip those things away. Finally, I share my own experiences creatively engaging with residents at a local memory care facility and what those experiences demonstrated with regard to narrative, being, and Self. The examination of material and experiences demonstrates that art taps into innate parts of human beings that science is unable to touch or treat; however, the reverse is also true for science. When faced with an issue as complex as Alzheimer's disease, art and science are strongest together, and I believe the cure to Alzheimer's lies in this unity. In the meantime, we must utilize the arts to validate the Selves of and improve the quality of life for our growing Alzheimer's population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

135799-Thumbnail Image.png

Holocaust & Tolerance Museum Website

Description

Link to website project: http://cacoope6.wix.com/tolerancemuseum The East Valley Jewish Community Center is working to build a Holocaust & Tolerance Museum adjacent to their community center campus in Chandler. As

Link to website project: http://cacoope6.wix.com/tolerancemuseum The East Valley Jewish Community Center is working to build a Holocaust & Tolerance Museum adjacent to their community center campus in Chandler. As a sophomore in college I was introduced to the EVJCC and this project when I saw two Holocaust survivors who lived through Sobibor death camp speak at an EVJCC event. After that, I looked for more information online, only to find none. A series of conversations with Steve Tepper of the EVJCC later, we decided on a project - a website that would be easy for him to maintain after I passed it over when my thesis was complete. I spent a little over a year gathering materials for this project and familiarizing myself with the people and projects involved. In addition to my own original materials, I used a collection of materials I was given access to by Steve Tepper, including filmed interviews with survivors, a documentary, news stories and more. I attended events, took my own photos, talked with Holocaust survivors and learned more about the museum itself, which will be a museum not only to commemorate the Holocaust but genocide and persecution around the globe. When it came time to make the website, I chose Wix as the medium because it was something I could make to the EVJCC's standards and specifications with my own original touches and flair, and something they could easily take over and update after I pass it along. The final product is a beginning website to help them get started with their online presence as a museum.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

134895-Thumbnail Image.png

I am AZ: A Travelogue Exploring the People and Places of Arizona's Small Town Museums

Description

I am AZ is the beginning of a personal book project which explores six small town museums around the state of Arizona. They include: Cave Creek Museum (Cave Creek), Rim

I am AZ is the beginning of a personal book project which explores six small town museums around the state of Arizona. They include: Cave Creek Museum (Cave Creek), Rim Country Museum (Payson), Navajo Country Historical Society (Holbrook), Superstition County Museum (Apache Junction), Bisbee Mining and Historical Museum (Bisbee), and The Powell Museum (Page). The document highlights these institutions as valuable assets to the community and state as they preserve the stories and artifacts pertaining to both state and local history. This document includes photos of the institutions, local history stories, and interviews with the directors from each of these museums. There are also descriptions of products that came as a result of this project including: postcards as a mode of relaying information about these places, a digital Arizona museum map to highlight the museums I did visit and keep a list of those I have yet to visit, and the accompanying pop-up exhibition that summarizes each place through photos and stories.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

152371-Thumbnail Image.png

Quliaqtuavut tuugaatigun (Our stories in ivory): reconnecting Arctic narratives with engraved drill bows

Description

This dissertation explores complex representations of spiritual, social and cultural ways of knowing embedded within engraved ivory drill bows from the Bering Strait. During the nineteenth century, multi-faceted ivory drill

This dissertation explores complex representations of spiritual, social and cultural ways of knowing embedded within engraved ivory drill bows from the Bering Strait. During the nineteenth century, multi-faceted ivory drill bows formed an ideal surface on which to recount life events and indigenous epistemologies reflective of distinct environmental and socio-cultural relationships. Carvers added motifs over time and the presence of multiple hands suggests a passing down of these objects as a form of familial history and cultural patrimony. Explorers, traders and field collectors to the Bering Strait eagerly acquired engraved drill bows as aesthetic manifestations of Arctic mores but recorded few details about the carvings resulting in a disconnect between the objects and their multi-layered stories. However, continued practices of ivory carving and storytelling within Bering Strait communities holds potential for engraved drill bows to animate oral histories and foster discourse between researchers and communities. Thus, this collaborative project integrates stylistic analyses and ethno-historical accounts on drill bows with knowledge shared by Alaska Native community members and is based on the understanding that oral narratives can bring life and meaning to objects within museum collections.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

154052-Thumbnail Image.png

The public face of history: the New Western History from the academy to Southwestern history museum exhibits

Description

This study examines history museums in Arizona and New Mexico to determine whether New Western History themes are prevalent, twenty years after the term was conceived. Patricia Limerick is credited

This study examines history museums in Arizona and New Mexico to determine whether New Western History themes are prevalent, twenty years after the term was conceived. Patricia Limerick is credited with using the expression in the 1980s, but she had to promote the concept frequently and for many years. There was resistance to changing from the Frederick Jackson Turner thesis of looking at the frontier as an expansion from the East, even while others were already writing more current historiography.

Limerick’s four “Cs”—continuity, convergence, conquest, and complexity—took a view of the West from the West, worthy of a separate perspective. These themes also allowed historians to reflect on what was happening locally, how and why various people were interacting, how there was less of a benevolent imbuing of European culture on Native Americans than there was a conquest of indigenous people, and how resource extraction created complex situations for all living things. While scholarly works were changing to provide relevant material based on these themes, museums were receiving thousands of visitors every year and may have been providing the Anglo-centric view of events or creating more inclusive displays. Label texts could have been either clarifying or confusing to a history loving audience.

Three types of museums were visited to determine whether there was a difference in display based on governing body. National Park Service sites, state sponsored institutions, and local city-based museums served as the study material. The age of the existing long-term exhibits ranged from brand new to fifty-one years extant. As important to the use of New Western History themes as the term of the current exhibit was the type of governing body.

Monographs, essays, and museum exhibits are all important to the dissemination of history. How they relate and how current they are to each other creates an opportunity for both academic and museum professional historians to reflect on the delivery systems used to enlighten a history-loving public.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

153751-Thumbnail Image.png

Museums for memory: exploring design elements that may enhance memory recall in aging individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)

Description

ABSTRACT

Millions of US aging individuals are at risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (Ad). Ad is progressive; there is no clinical cure

ABSTRACT

Millions of US aging individuals are at risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (Ad). Ad is progressive; there is no clinical cure to date. Certain drugs treat symptoms yet fog memory. Memory activity is critical to strengthen cognition. The Phoenix Art Museum (PAM) and Banner Alzheimer's Institute (BAI) founded the Arts Engagement Program (AEP), a non-clinical, specialized arts program for adults with (MCI) and their caregiver. The museum environment is thought to enhance communication and raise self-esteem in certain MCI individuals. The interior surroundings may spurn memory enhancement. Scholarship to substantiate this theory is minimal; therefore, further studies are required. Empirical literature regarding design elements researched specific types of memory impairment was employed. The hypotheses that design elements of the museum's infrastructure and design elements from art themes enhance memory, and the results of these findings when applied to other environments enhance memory emerged. An experience-based study was performed. Semi-structured interviews noting design elements of both infrastructure and art were conducted after each of nine AEP sessions with volunteers from 8 dyads, a term used by the PAM as one caregiver and one MCI individual. The presiding docent was later interviewed. Volunteer interviews with dyads and docents was coded and ranked. Overlapping themes that tallied five or higher were considered significant due the low sample size. Results showed that neither group considered infrastructure design elements or art theme design elements a contributor to memory enhancement. The hypotheses proved null. Both groups expressed pleasure in experiencing the PAM’s environment. Keywords: MCI, infrastructure, art themes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

154751-Thumbnail Image.png

A comparative analysis of museums in Paris, Barcelona, and Phoenix

Description

The research titled “A Comparative Analysis of Museums in Paris, Barcelona,

and Phoenix” critically reviews six museums in three culturally diverse countries. This research looks at features within marketing, space, and

The research titled “A Comparative Analysis of Museums in Paris, Barcelona,

and Phoenix” critically reviews six museums in three culturally diverse countries. This research looks at features within marketing, space, and branding which may or may not differ depending on socio-cultural factors, histories, traditions, etc. in Spain, France, and the United States. A conclusion is formed around the identity of each museum through the variables of marketing, space, and branding.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

149764-Thumbnail Image.png

Italian antiquities in America: contextualizing repatriation

Description

From inception, the earliest museums in Europe were a haven for artifacts, many of which represented world cultures within its walls. The tradition of encyclopedic collecting characterized European museums and

From inception, the earliest museums in Europe were a haven for artifacts, many of which represented world cultures within its walls. The tradition of encyclopedic collecting characterized European museums and U.S. institutions modeled themselves after this example. In the 20th century, defining cultural property, in the form of excavated objects, became a priority for many nations and resulted in the scrutiny of ancient artifacts, in particular. This led to the establishment of international protocols which sought to protect items during times of both peace and war. Despite international legislation, the trade of illicit antiquities continued. A major advocate for repatriation, the nation of Italy aggressively sought return of many objects from antiquity and recently approached the Metropolitan Museum of Art regarding several items whose provenance was suspect. Ultimately the conflict was resolved through The Metropolitan Museum of Art-Republic of Italy Agreement of February 21, 2006, which transferred the title of six antiquities to Italy in return for long term loans of equivalent objects to the museum. The landmark agreement represents a mutually profitable resolution to a situation potentially plaguing thousands of institutions worldwide. The implications of replication of the agreement can potentially change how museums, nations and the public understand concepts of ownership and may reduce the role of permanent collections in favor of sharing, rather than possessing, world heritage.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

149736-Thumbnail Image.png

The museum, the flâneur, and the book: the exhibitionary complex in the work of Henry James

Description

The Victorian era was the age of museum development in the United States. In the wake of these institutions, another important figure of the nineteenth century emerged--the flâneur. The flâneur

The Victorian era was the age of museum development in the United States. In the wake of these institutions, another important figure of the nineteenth century emerged--the flâneur. The flâneur represents the city, and provided new mechanisms of seeing to the public. The flâneur taught citizens how to gaze with a panoptic eye. The increasing importance of cultural institutions contributed to a new means of presenting power and interacting with the viewing public. Tony Bennett's exhibitionary complex theory, argues that nineteenth-century museums were institutions of power that educated, civilized, and through surveillance, encourage self-regulation of crowds. The flâneur's presence in the nineteenth century informed the public about modes of seeing and self-regulation--which in turn helped establish Bennett's theory inside the museum. The popular writing and literature of the time provides an opportunity to examine the extent of the exhibitionary complex and the flâneur. One of the most prominent nineteenth-century authors, Henry James, not only utilizes museums in his work, but he often uses them in just the manner Bennett puts forth in his theory. This is significant because the ideas about museums in James's work shaped the minds of an expanding literary public in the United States, and further educated, civilized, and regulated readers. James also represents the flâneur in his writing, which speaks to broader cultural implications of the both exhibitionary complex on the outside world, and the effects of broader cultural influences on the museum. Beyond the impact of James's work, in the late nineteenth century American culture increasingly became centered around the printed word. The central position of books in American culture at the end of the nineteenth century allowed books and libraries to appropriate the exhibitionary complex and become tools of power in their own right. The book and the library relate to the museum as part of a larger cultural environment, which emerged as a result of modernity and a response to the ever-changing nineteenth-century world.  

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011