Matching Items (48)

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High School Biology Teacher Knowledge Governing the Laws Related to the Teaching of Evolution and Creationism

Description

This project examined the relationship of science teachers' knowledge about the laws relating to the teaching of creationism/evolution in public schools using multiple demographic factors. Overall, teachers correctly identified only

This project examined the relationship of science teachers' knowledge about the laws relating to the teaching of creationism/evolution in public schools using multiple demographic factors. Overall, teachers correctly identified only 7 out of 10 "yes" or "no" answers about the laws, this score is only slightly better than the expected 5 out of 10 that would be obtained from guessing. Statistically significant results in differences in the overall score on the survey were found for three major variables. Teachers who say creationism should be taught in the classroom have a lower score than those who say it should not be taught in the classroom, with a large effect size. Teachers who teach biology or a life science had significantly higher scores than those who do not, with a small/medium effect size. Older teachers had significantly higher scores than younger teachers, with a small effect size. Identifying the demographic variables that effect teacher knowledge about the laws is the first step to determining how to educate teachers on the legality teaching of creationism/evolution in public school classrooms to avoid violations of the First Amendment.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Physics Secondary Education: How Perception Creates Educational Realities

Description

This study explores the significant roles and responsibilities of Arizona physics teachers as well as the effect that these teachers have on students and thus their futures. In a two-fold

This study explores the significant roles and responsibilities of Arizona physics teachers as well as the effect that these teachers have on students and thus their futures. In a two-fold survey administered to all 194 public comprehensive high school physics teachers with 60% participation, questions regarding the perception and expectations that physics teachers hold for themselves, students, and school counselors are addressed as well as the corresponding practices. This survey reveals that generally, teachers feel that students have preconceptions about what physics is and what the course requires, and yet approximately half of the teachers do not make significant recruitment efforts. It is pertinent to ask why physics has one of the lowest enrollment statuses out of all the sciences in high school. Even more so, it is crucial to ask why there is a teacher shortage in the subject of physics. In exploring these questions, results to the previously mentioned genres of questions will speak to the issues at hand and are intended to give a robust explanation as to why physics is fading away in Arizona.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Systematic Literature Review Conceptualization of Inclusive Education within Arizona's Borderlands

Description

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family members. Although there is research that states along international borders are complex and diverse educational spaces, the information found regarding special education along the U.S-Mexico border mostly centers on the issue of over-representation of Mexican-American, Yaqui and Navajo students. There is validity and need to present these specific issues and groups of individuals, however there is little empirical data that involves the attitudes, perspectives and experiences of other stakeholders, such as parents, educators, and administrators who participate in special education processes, in a way that reflects education in borderlands as an asset-based setting and that engages in dialogue about across all of the disabilities categories protected under IDEA and 504 plans. Key Words: special education, parents, teachers, literature review, borderlands

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

A Workshop for Educators: Social Emotional Learning to Support Students with Adverse Childhood Experiences

Description

I have created a workshop for educators. The workshop describes the significance of adverse childhood experiences in a student's life. It also displays how an educator might use Social Emotional Learning strategies to support students who have experienced trauma.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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After English: A Study of Support for Reclassified English Language Learners in Arizona

Description

This thesis investigates the environment of support for reclassified English Language Learners (RCELLs) in Arizona schools. Arizona English Language Learner (ELL) policy and pedagogy have been the subjects of research

This thesis investigates the environment of support for reclassified English Language Learners (RCELLs) in Arizona schools. Arizona English Language Learner (ELL) policy and pedagogy have been the subjects of research nationwide; many studies demonstrate that ELLs struggle before, during and after participating in Arizona ELL programs (Lillie et al. 2012; Roa 2012; Garcia, Lawton & de Figuieredo 2012; Office of Civil Rights 2012). Despite evidence that the achievement gap between RCELLs and mainstream students is not closing, little information is available about additional language support that RCELLs might receive in mainstream classrooms. This thesis addresses that void of information through: 1) A literature review of the framework of RCELL support, as outlined by the Arizona Department of Education and relevant studies, and 2) a study of teacher and principal opinion about support components for RCELLs and whether such support is adequate. Study findings present that teachers and principals generally believe RCELLs are well-supported, in terms of both the availability and quality of study-defined support components. Yet there is only weak consensus among teachers that support components are adequate. Additionally, teachers' knowledgeability related to important RCELL support components is low, undermining the reliability of teacher responses. The disconnect between participants' optimistic perceptions of support and the external evidence of low RCELL achievement is rationalized by two conjectures. The first is that teachers are not knowledgeable about RCELL support components and cannot accurately gauge the quality of such support. The second is that existing support components are effective at assisting RCELLs with English learning but are not sufficient to close RCELL academic content achievement gaps.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Exploring the Digital World: Integrating Digital Literacy & Tools in Education

Description

This century has brought about incredible advancements in technology and academia, changing the workforce and the future leaders that will drive it: students. However, the integration of digital literacy and

This century has brought about incredible advancements in technology and academia, changing the workforce and the future leaders that will drive it: students. However, the integration of digital literacy and digital tools in many United States K\u201412 schools is often overlooked. Through "Exploring the Digital World," students, parents, and teachers can follow the creatures of this story-driven program as they learn the importance of digital literacy in the 21st century.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Recording For Teachers

Description

There is value in audio recording for teachers, whether one is a music teacher recording their students and ensembles or a classroom teacher recording oneself or their students. Music and

There is value in audio recording for teachers, whether one is a music teacher recording their students and ensembles or a classroom teacher recording oneself or their students. Music and classroom teachers have various reasons for wanting to record their students, such as hearing what is being produced in rehearsals and having students reflect on their own performance and musical progress. Teachers may desire to record their students, but they may not know how to do so. Simple recording tools such as cell phones do not produce quality recordings, and unless they have specialized training, teachers may not be familiar with other kinds of recording equipment or how they can set up equipment in order to obtain a good quality recording. I searched for resources on recording equipment and techniques, but I could not find a single source that teachers could consult to learn about the basics of recording equipment and techniques. Teachers have limited time and may also have limited financial resources. The purpose of my project was to create a free and easy-to-use resource for teachers to answer their questions on recording and give them the tools that they need in order to get started with making basic, high quality recordings. The research process included research about different kinds of recording hardware and software, documenting recording techniques for different settings and instruments, and interviewing teachers about their needs. The product that that resulted from this project is a website, Recording For Teachers (https://sites.google.com/view/recordingforteachers/). This website features information about recording equipment, the recording process, how to produce shareable files, and an interactive means of posting questions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Teacher evaluation systems: how teachers and teacher quality are (re)defined by market-based discourses

Description

Teacher evaluation policies have recently shifted in the United States. For the first time in history, many states, districts, and administrators are now required to evaluate teachers by methods that

Teacher evaluation policies have recently shifted in the United States. For the first time in history, many states, districts, and administrators are now required to evaluate teachers by methods that are up to 50% based on their "value-added," as demonstrated at the classroom-level by growth on student achievement data over time. Other related instruments and methods, such as classroom observations and rubrics, have also become common practices in teacher evaluation systems. Such methods are consistent with the neoliberal discourse that has dominated the social and political sphere for the past three decades. Employing a discourse analytic approach that called upon a governmentality framework, the author used a complementary approach to understand how contemporary teacher evaluation polices, practices, and instruments work to discursively (re)define teachers and teacher quality in terms of their market value.

For the first part of the analysis, the author collected and analyzed documents and field notes related to the teacher evaluation system at one urban middle school. The analysis included official policy documents, official White House speeches and press releases, evaluation system promotional materials, evaluator training materials, and the like. For the second part of the analysis, she interviewed teachers and their evaluators at the local middle school in order to understand how the participants had embodied the market-based discourse to define themselves as teachers and qualify their practice, quality, and worth accordingly.

The findings of the study suggest that teacher evaluation policies, practices, and instruments make possible a variety of techniques, such as numericization, hierarchical surveillance, normalizing judgments, and audit, in order to first make teachers objects of knowledge and then act upon that knowledge to manage teachers' conduct. The author also found that teachers and their evaluators have taken up this discourse in order to think about and act upon themselves as responsibilized subjects. Ultimately, the author argues that while much of the attention related to teacher evaluations has focused on the instruments used to measure the construct of teacher quality, that teacher evaluation instruments work in a mutually constitutive ways to discursively shape the construct of teacher quality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The effect of change facilitation coaching using the concerns-based adoption model with an urban elementary school teacher-leadership team

Description

Public demands for accountability and educational change are at an all-time high. No Child Left Behind set the stage for public accountability of educators and the recently created Race to

Public demands for accountability and educational change are at an all-time high. No Child Left Behind set the stage for public accountability of educators and the recently created Race to the Top grant raised the stakes of public school accountability even more with the creation of national standards and assessments as well as public accountability of individual teacher performance based on student test scores. This high-stakes context has placed pressure on local schools to change their instructional practices rapidly to ensure students are learning what they need to in order to perform well on looming Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) exams. The purpose of this mixed methods action research study was to explore a shared leadership model and discover the impact of a change facilitation team using the Concerns Based Adoption Model tools on the speed and quality of innovation diffusion at a Title One elementary school. The nine-member change facilitation team received support for 20 weeks in the form of professional development and ongoing team coaching as a means to empower teacher-leaders to more effectively take on the challenges of change. Eight of those members participated in this research. This approach draws on the research on change, learning organizations, and coaching. Quantitative results from the Change Facilitator Stages of Concern Questionnaire were triangulated with qualitative data from interviews, field notes, and Innovation Configuration Maps. Results show the impact on instructional innovation when teacher-leadership is leveraged to support change. Further, there is an important role for change coaches when leading change initiatives. Implications from this study can be used to support other site leaders grappling with instructional innovation and calls for additional research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Exploring instructional coaches' attitudes and use of the DataCapture mobile application to collect video-based evidence in teacher evaluation

Description

An integral part of teacher development are teacher observations. Many teachers are observed once or twice a year to evaluate their performance and hold them accountable for meeting standards. Instructional

An integral part of teacher development are teacher observations. Many teachers are observed once or twice a year to evaluate their performance and hold them accountable for meeting standards. Instructional coaches, however, observe and work with teachers to help them reflect on their performance, with the goal of improving their practice. Video-based evidence has long been used in connection with teacher reflection and as the technology necessary to record video has become more readily available, video recordings have found an increasing presence in teacher observations. In addition, more and more schools are turning to mobile technology to help record evidence during teacher observations. Several mobile applications have been developed, which are designed to help instructional coaches, administrators, and teachers make the most of teacher observations. This study looked at the use of the DataCapture mobile application to record video-based evidence in teacher observations as part of an instructional coaching program in a large public school district in the Southwestern United States. Six instructional coaches and two teachers participated in interviews at the end of the study period. Additional data was collected from the DataCapture mobile application and from a survey of instructional coaches conducted by the school district in connection with its Title I programs. Results show that instructional coaches feel that using video-based evidence for teacher reflection is effective in a number of ways. Teachers who have experienced seeing themselves on video also felt that video-based evidence is effective at improving teacher reflection, while teachers who have not yet experienced seeing themselves on video displayed extreme apprehensiveness about being video recorded in the classroom. Instructional coaches felt the DataCapture mobile application was beneficial in teacher evaluation, but there were several issues that impacted the use of the mobile application and video-based evidence, including logistics, time requirements, and administrative support. The discussion focuses on recommendations for successfully using video-based evidence in an instructional coaching context, as well as some suggestions for other researchers attempting to study how video-based evidence impacts teachers' ability to reflect on their own teaching.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013