Matching Items (5)

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The Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law Learning Environment: Spring 2017 Evaluation Report

Description

This is an evaluation of the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law learning environment project which involved 120 participants (32 faculty and 88 students). In 2016, the Sandra Day O'Connor

This is an evaluation of the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law learning environment project which involved 120 participants (32 faculty and 88 students). In 2016, the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law moved their main building to the newly built Beus Center for Law and Society building at the downtown Phoenix campus in order to bring the law students and faculty closer to the legal community that is present in downtown Phoenix. Prior to this move surveys regarding the Tempe campus were administered to the law students and faculty along with classroom observations and focus groups in order to conduct an evaluation of the environment. This evaluation examines the following six areas about the Tempe campus: the physical classroom environment; the instructional strategies used by instructors in the classroom; technology utilized in the classroom; frequency of technical difficulties by the instructor; and interactions between faculty, students, and the legal community. This evaluation only analyzed the quantitative data that was provided from the survey questions and not the qualitative data from classroom observations and focus groups. Within this evaluation is an explanation of the project that was conducted in part with the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law and an overview of the participants involved in this evaluation. Additionally, this report will describe the methodology that was used to conduct the evaluation. Lastly, this evaluation includes the findings based off of the survey given to the evaluation participants and the recommendation for the new Beus Center for Law and Society based on the findings of the evaluation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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An Examination of Flexible Seating in the Classroom

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine how using flexible seating options and alternative seating arrangements within a classroom may benefit students. It also sought to identify current teachers’

The purpose of this study was to examine how using flexible seating options and alternative seating arrangements within a classroom may benefit students. It also sought to identify current teachers’ perceptions of flexible seating as a teaching methodology. Flexible seating is defined as having multiple seating options within one’s classroom, often leading to include elements of student choice. Such seating options may include active seating where the seat allows for movement. Specifically, this study examined the behavior, academic, community, and sensory benefits that students may experience from interacting with a flexible classroom environment. Data were collected from current teachers via an online survey as well as an occupational therapist via an interview. The data supported existing literature indicating that there are behavior and sensory benefits to flexible seating options, however, additional research would need to be done in order to draw concrete connections between academic performance and classroom community with flexible seating options.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Classroom resiliency: a comparison of Navajo elementary students' perceptions of their classroom environment

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a gender difference in how students perceived their classroom environment on the Navajo Nation public school.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Small groups and figured worlds: an analysis of identities and literacy practices in small-group literacy sessions

Description

Small-group literacy instruction is frequently used in schools in order to engage students in discussions around texts. Instructional settings vary and produce a range of results. They are complex social

Small-group literacy instruction is frequently used in schools in order to engage students in discussions around texts. Instructional settings vary and produce a range of results. They are complex social spaces in which students position one another and themselves as they enact different identities. These identities are associated with sets of literacy practices. This paper describes the results of a study examining the ways in which 3rd and 4th grade students and their teachers positioned themselves and one another in three different small-group literacy settings and the literacy practices that they used as they performed their identities. Using a multimodal discourse analysis (Kress, 2012) and D/discourse analysis (Gee, 2005, 2011), the form and function of language and gestures were used to look at the kinds of identities that the participants enacted and the literacy practices that the students engaged in the different settings. The results of the analysis suggested that the identities that the participants performed were related to the context in which interactions around texts took place. The identities themselves were connected to the use certain literacy practices. The literacy practices used by the participants were also related to the classroom context. The findings suggest that it is important for teachers to consider the figured worlds active in small-group settings, the identities performed within those worlds, and the literacy practices in which students engage.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Designing literacy rich classroom environments for young children: : a study of teachers' design processes and tools

Description

The development of literacy abilities in young children has been a major concern for authorities and teachers in the USA for the last two decades. Significant effort has been devoted

The development of literacy abilities in young children has been a major concern for authorities and teachers in the USA for the last two decades. Significant effort has been devoted to ensure that preschool settings allow and motivate children to engage in literacy activities before entering kindergarten. Research has found that a rich classroom environment in preschool settings enables teachers to encourage literacy interest in children at a young age. While a large amount of research has concentrated in testing the effect of prescriptive modifications in the classroom environment, few have focused on studying the design process and tools that teachers follow to design their classrooms. Public policy and research studies in the United States, mention the design of the classroom environment among teacher's responsibilities, but they do not include practical or methodological guides for them to use. The purpose of this research was to study the design process and tools that teachers use to design literacy rich classrooms in preschool settings. A case study was conducted at the ASU Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Preschool at Arizona State University. This setting provides a unique opportunity for an exploratory study of this nature because it is a private child development laboratory with a flexible curriculum. Participant observation sessions and in depth semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore the design process used and experienced by the teachers. Findings revealed an iterative and cyclic design process that is repeated over time adjusting to the influence of numerous factors. Results also suggest that teacher's knowledge and beliefs highly influence the organization of their classrooms. Considering these factors as a standpoint allows for further exploration to determine a design process suitable for teachers when designing their learning environments. The use of a structured yet flexible design process, can be a potential tool for educators to design their classrooms, collaborate, document and transmit their knowledge. Although the findings correspond to a specific site studied, the implications are wide reaching as problems and opportunities expressed by the staff are common to other educational settings with similar characteristics.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013