Matching Items (10)

Dwelling in the Dream

Description

It seems that we are incessantly scolded about the importance of the American political process and its virtue of practicality in contemporary society. Whether through the accumulation of the so-called

It seems that we are incessantly scolded about the importance of the American political process and its virtue of practicality in contemporary society. Whether through the accumulation of the so-called facts about the issues that inform the veneration of the contest between candidates, the stern and noble duty of becoming an activist performing dreary tasks, or the religious fervor surrounding the sacred obligation of voting, we are assured and reassured that our system is sound and that we must only confront problems of implementation rather than structural ones. From here, the narrative goes that if we subscribe to the doctrine of exclusively employing the efficient, strictly rational, and the immediately realistic, we will almost assuredly succeed in persuading others toward producing the resolutions required to solve our shared challenges. Admittedly, these ideas serve a role in addressing the issues we face. However, when unaided by sophisticated and nuanced notions and applications of the fantastic, the beautiful, the ideal, the possible, the playful, the useless, in a word, dreaming, we foreclose the possibility of building a future that can qualitatively improve society and more meaningfully elevate our being-with-one-another in the world. Therefore, this work aims to validate the aforementioned claim by engaging in a critical, political, and hermeneutic exploration of what it means to dream against the backdrop of present-day American politics. It will honestly seek to analyze the prevailing notions of contemporary western thought and action to work on the way toward a new, yet latent, way of understanding. This understanding would fundamentally revolutionize the task of civilization as being grounded upon the appropriate channeling of our desires and dissatisfactions toward actualizing the projections of our imagination. Simply put, this project seeks to repudiate the mandate of work as toil and order as oppression to clear the way for envisioning a more suitable alternative.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Form, Material, and Color: The importance of Aesthetics and User Experience in Product Design

Description

The purpose of this research project is to outline the design process and to uncover some of the considerations that designers must keep in mind in an effort to design

The purpose of this research project is to outline the design process and to uncover some of the considerations that designers must keep in mind in an effort to design more empathetically. These will include a focus on appropriate aesthetics, user experience design, and designing for innovation. These findings are then applied to a three-part design project to illustrate the importance of these guidelines.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Manifesting Disability to Preserve the Sanctity of Human Life

Description

Abstract As humans, we can instill a different mindset when it comes to our bodies and suffering. Using Antonin Artuad's contributions to the theater in examining the role and consequences

Abstract As humans, we can instill a different mindset when it comes to our bodies and suffering. Using Antonin Artuad's contributions to the theater in examining the role and consequences of dehumanization, disability can be reimagined. There is a need for a "true theater" of "cruelty," not in the literal sense, but in a metaphorical sense whereby the essence of being alive is revealed through the exaggerated gestures of the true theater, or "poetry in space." Disability is the embodiment of chaos, in the way it manifests the human condition through the reality of having a body, and as the embodiment of conflict between ostensible symbols of socio-cultural "order," and the sanctity of human life. If this chaos is destructive to the socio-cultural, symbolic order but poetic in space, then reimagining disability in order to understand it can serve to create true compassion in the human experience. While "order" in the socio-cultural sense produces hegemony via a hierarchy of symbols and consequences, chaos serves as the innate poetry of the body: inspirational, pure and valuable. It is oriented towards that essence most urgent to humankind: the raw experience of the physical body, despite its continued existence in a confining, conflicting world. Hegemony, generated by the social symbolic order (SSO) attempts to create order out of perceived chaos and claims that suffering in the body is detrimental to life, manifesting violence towards disabled people because they are viewed as suffering and limited. Hegemony creates the conditions whereby the disabled are susceptible into thinking their own lives lack value.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

The Cinematic Portrayal of Subjective Experience

Description

Directors make choices on how a movie is film, these choices effect everything in the film and there are multiple factors that go into that decision-making process. Directors usually make

Directors make choices on how a movie is film, these choices effect everything in the film and there are multiple factors that go into that decision-making process. Directors usually make decisions based on the entire story and their vantage point of know everything. For example, a director might choose to make a piece of information known to the audience before the character’s know so that it raises tension. The creative project refers to this type of filmmaking as: “objective cinema”. The alternative is when a director makes decisions not based on the overall story but on the reality of a character(s). That is, filmmaking techniques are used in service of communicating a character’s emotional and situational reality.
The goal of such an exercise is to bring the audience closer to a character, typically the main character. A film is driven by the audience’s connection to the plot and the main character, who is typically the driving force behind the narrative. Having an audience closer to the main character is advantageous to give the audience something personal to latch onto. Getting invested in a single character’s story is a tactic that most films use and while some use traditional filmmaking styles to narrate the film, some put in these subjective moments.
Most movies include a mix of objective and subjective scene; however, the vast majority of screen time is usually objective. Subjective moments are just that, moments within a film where the filmmaking is visually distinct from before in order to communicate the transition into a character’ subjective experience of reality. The process of using cinematic techniques: sound, images and actors to create emotion is the focus of the thesis. What specific techniques do director and other filmmakers use to create these moments from the perspective of a specific character? The research on this creative project included reverse engineering scenes to firgue out the technical specifications that the filmmakers use. What kind of lighting, cameras and sound design where employed? Why were those techniques chosen to represent a character’s subjective reality? And most importantly, why do those techniques evoke those emotions?

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Feeling the pull: using magnetic modeling to understand emotions in form

Description

Research in design, emotion, and product experience has focused on establishing a connection between the aesthetic qualities of products and emotions. Studies in product expression have demonstrated relevant patterns between

Research in design, emotion, and product experience has focused on establishing a connection between the aesthetic qualities of products and emotions. Studies in product expression have demonstrated relevant patterns between aesthetics and spatial reasoning. In design research, fully understanding latent qualities of consumers assists in developing an immersive product experience which in turn can engender a lasting product relationship. This study evaluates how people interpret the emotionality of form in order to establish a veritable method for interpreting emotional variables in 3D objects.

This research assesses the emotional perception of aesthetic values in 2D and 3D teapots. A teapot image collection and taxonomy was constructed with 101 images of teapots across four centuries. Eighty-four participants completed a card sorting task of twenty randomly distributed teapot images (taken from the total 101 image collection) into Plutchik's eight emotion categories. Individual pieces of the teapots were coded according to the base, handle, lid, or spout that was presented in the image. The coded pieces from the card-sorting task were arranged per frequency in the overall set. Through the use of response data from the card sorting task, a network of the images was developed in Pathfinder. The content of these results were compared to images of models gathered during an interview with an interactive co-creation method referred to as Magnetic Modeling. Magnetic Modeling is a methodological tool that allowed participants to manipulate individualized pieces of 3D printed teapots into proposed emotional labels.

The findings of this research establish prototypical associations in aesthetic traits and teapot piece combinations for each emotion category. Participant responses were categorized into 4 personas representing the types of perceptual bias in the studies' participants. A discussion and comparison of the methods for academic and theoretical practice is provided.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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A computational approach to relative image aesthetics

Description

Computational visual aesthetics has recently become an active research area. Existing state-of-art methods formulate this as a binary classification task where a given image is predicted to be beautiful or

Computational visual aesthetics has recently become an active research area. Existing state-of-art methods formulate this as a binary classification task where a given image is predicted to be beautiful or not. In many applications such as image retrieval and enhancement, it is more important to rank images based on their aesthetic quality instead of binary-categorizing them. Furthermore, in such applications, it may be possible that all images belong to the same category. Hence determining the aesthetic ranking of the images is more appropriate. To this end, a novel problem of ranking images with respect to their aesthetic quality is formulated in this work. A new data-set of image pairs with relative labels is constructed by carefully selecting images from the popular AVA data-set. Unlike in aesthetics classification, there is no single threshold which would determine the ranking order of the images across the entire data-set.

This problem is attempted using a deep neural network based approach that is trained on image pairs by incorporating principles from relative learning. Results show that such relative training procedure allows the network to rank the images with a higher accuracy than a state-of-art network trained on the same set of images using binary labels. Further analyzing the results show that training a model using the image pairs learnt better aesthetic features than training on same number of individual binary labelled images.

Additionally, an attempt is made at enhancing the performance of the system by incorporating saliency related information. Given an image, humans might fixate their vision on particular parts of the image, which they might be subconsciously intrigued to. I therefore tried to utilize the saliency information both stand-alone as well as in combination with the global and local aesthetic features by performing two separate sets of experiments. In both the cases, a standard saliency model is chosen and the generated saliency maps are convoluted with the images prior to passing them to the network, thus giving higher importance to the salient regions as compared to the remaining. Thus generated saliency-images are either used independently or along with the global and the local features to train the network. Empirical results show that the saliency related aesthetic features might already be learnt by the network as a sub-set of the global features from automatic feature extraction, thus proving the redundancy of the additional saliency module.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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The "American Sublime" in Symphonic Music of the United States: Case Study Applications of a Literary and Visual Arts Aesthetic

Description

The American sublime aesthetic, discussed frequently in literature and art of the United States, is equally manifest in the nation’s symphonic music as a concurrent and complementary aesthetic. The musical

The American sublime aesthetic, discussed frequently in literature and art of the United States, is equally manifest in the nation’s symphonic music as a concurrent and complementary aesthetic. The musical application of the American sublime supports and enriches current scholarship on American musical identity, nationality, and the American symphonic enterprise. I suggest that the American sublime forms an integral part of nineteenth-century American music and is key to understanding the symphony as a genre in the United States. I discuss American symphonic works by Anthony Philip Heinrich, George Frederick Bristow, William Henry Fry, Dennison Wheelock, and Florence Beatrice Price, aided by an analytical tool which I developed, to illuminate my appraisal of the nineteenth-century American symphonic enterprise. Their compositions contribute meaningfully to the complex history of identity formation for both American composers and the nation. In focusing on these incorporations of the sublime by white composers and composers of color from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, my research demonstrates how the American sublime expanded and transformed to better accommodate the country’s diverse citizenry, despite the marginalization of some.

The nineteenth-century trans-Atlantic dialogue between Americans and their European contemporaries sustained a “distinctly cosmopolitan cultural ethos,” a phenomenon also described by Douglas Shadle as “one of the most vibrant intercultural exchanges in all of Western music history.” This dialogue shaped the cultural formation of identity for many American composers throughout the century and provided the foundation for a symphonic repertoire, which became internationally recognized for the first time as “American.” In this cosmopolitan environment, the Americanization of the sublime aided in the rebranding of long-established European artistic expressions like the symphony, while perpetuating the idealization of the nation’s geography, its people, and its beliefs. Perhaps most importantly, the American sublime supported the widely held belief in American exceptionalism and manifest destiny. The applicability of the American sublime to various genres made it a useful tool to assert autonomy and individuality in forms such as the symphony. For this reason, a revaluation of American symphonic music and its relation to the American sublime amplifies the significance of this repertoire.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Architectural street credibility: reframing contemporary architecture to sidewalk level with images from Google street view

Description

The purpose of this research was to assess the condition of the human/building interface at sidewalk level by reframing our view of contemporary architecture using Google Street View images. In

The purpose of this research was to assess the condition of the human/building interface at sidewalk level by reframing our view of contemporary architecture using Google Street View images. In particular, the goal was to find a means by which aesthetic engagement in the urban cultural ecology could be measured. Photo-elicitation, semantic differential, and visual assessment methods were adapted and combined to develop a photo-semantic assessment survey instrument for this study aimed at evaluating respondent preference for building images. Architectural adjective usage amongst 14 graduate students was surveyed, and the resulting 175-word list was synthesized down to seven positive and seven negative adjectives. Eleven representative buildings were selected from the Phaidon Atlas of 21st Century World Architecture, and photographic Street Views were created. The photo-semantic assessment survey instrument was administered to 62 graduate students given their demographic is reasonably similar to the urban walker stakeholder in the outcome. Respondent preference for the building images was then ranked ordered and correlations were run against various image factors including facade complexity, transparency, and streetscape quality. Moderate to strong correlations between preference and several image factors were observed indicating that certain building design factors, particularly facade complexity, may play a predictable role. Several avenues for future research are suggested including the comparison of lab versus on-site respondents; the comparison of user types including targeted, passerby and tourist; the effect of skyline on user preference for Street Views; and the effect of participation in the building making process on short and long term respondent preference.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Using design to make the home whole: meaning and the model home : Arizona in the 1950s

Description

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how the home building industry uses these spaces to promote images of family life to increase sales. This research notes that not only do the structure, design, and layout of the model home formulate cultural identity but also the furnishings and materials within. Together, the model home and carefully selected artifacts placed therein help to express specific chosen lifestyles as that the home builder determines. This thesis considers the model home as constructed as well as builder's publications, descriptions, and advertisements. The research recognizes the many facets of merchandising, consumerism, and commercialism influencing the design and architecture of the suburban home. Historians of visual and cultural studies often investigate these issues as separate components. By contrast, this thesis offers an integrated framework of inquiry, drawing upon such disciplines as cultural history, anthropology, and material culture. The research methodology employs two forms of content analysis - image and text. The study analyzes 36 model homes built in Phoenix, Arizona, during the period 1955-1956. The thesis explores how the builder sends a message, i.e. images, ideals, and aspirations, to the potential home buyer through the design and decoration of the model home. It then speculates how the home buyer responds to those messages. The symbiotic relationship between the sender and receiver, together, tells a story about the Phoenix lifestyle and the domestic ideals of the 1950s. Builders sent messages surrounding convenience, spaciousness, added luxury, and indoor-outdoor living to a growing and discriminating home buying market.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013