Matching Items (11)

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An Analysis of the Impact of Female Leadership on Corporate Social Responsibility

Description

This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female

This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female leaders within the upper management (i.e. board of directors and CEOs) of S&P 500 firms. Since several studies identify a positive relationship between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, our case study of IBM and PepsiCo aims to provide a real-life framework to these theoretical models. Ultimately, our case study does align with the findings of those models, yet also provides a unique perspective as to the reasoning for the difference in CSR outcomes, citing business strategy as opposed to altruism and other-orientation. Due to our limited sample size, our findings do not empirically support this notion, but instead offers a potential area for further research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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The Facebook Revolution: A Case Study in the Need for New Forms of Social Responsibility in the Way Private Owners Manage Essential Public Services.

Description

This paper uses Facebook as a case study for other technological and social media companies given factors presented by the Digital Age. Three different pillars are used to analyze the

This paper uses Facebook as a case study for other technological and social media companies given factors presented by the Digital Age. Three different pillars are used to analyze the company. First an examination of the manipulation of users on Facebook by Russian actors is presented. Next, the paper examines whether Facebook is promoting civic participation for good. Lastly, an analyzation of the rising trend of hate speech and extremists using the site is presented. This examination of Facebook then posed three questions regarding companies in the Digital Age as a whole. The first was "What is the extent of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Digital Age?" The second was, "What special obligations do for-profit companies have when it comes to safeguarding the privacy of individuals, or at least insuring that their stored information does not harm them?". The last question presented was, "How Can the Profit Motive and Corporate Morality Co-Exist in the Digital Age?" The findings of this case study showed that due to different factors that are presented in the Digital Age, these ideals of Corporate Social Responsibility, Privacy and Corporate Morality may be even more challenging to uphold during this Age of Information. Due to this fact, companies such as Facebook have an even greater responsibility to abide by these ideals of Corporate Social Responsibility, Privacy and Corporate Morality. This is because of an even larger potential for negative effects due to technological change. Regardless of the possibility for regulation by government, third-party organization or by the organizations themselves, Digital Age Corporations have the duty to protect their users from harm and maintain these three ideals.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Corporate Responsibility and the 21s Century Business Model: Trends and Challenges

Description

For decades, corporate firms have included corporate responsibility initiatives in their regular business functions in an effort to communicate a priority toward the communities they operate in, rather than just

For decades, corporate firms have included corporate responsibility initiatives in their regular business functions in an effort to communicate a priority toward the communities they operate in, rather than just the customers they serve. These actions \u2014 whether implemented through financial or human resources \u2014 have grown to be a common addition to business models across industries. In recent years, however, the simple addition of a community-oriented campaign to a firm's regular business proceedings have become less effective in positioning a firm as a devoted corporate citizen. Today, consumers have access to more information and opportunities for substitutes than ever before, and as they make buying decisions, they are interested in seeing the firms they support orient themselves at the heart of community engagement, rather than interacting with the community through passive support. This study and discussion highlights the trends that several corporate responsibility professionals have seen emerge in recent years regarding their respective employers' corporate responsibility initiatives. Thoughts and reactions from corporate responsibility managers representing financial, education, insurance, and technology companies will be synthesized and analyzed for trends and shared positive and negative experiences related to their common work in initiating corporate responsibility programs at their respective firms. The discussion will also illustrate the specific challenges each of the professionals face daily in implementing successful CR programs within their firms. In aggregate, this discussion will provide a comprehensive look at what exactly firms are doing in today's CR sphere: it will demonstrate what trends are working well, which have yet to be tailored to have the best impact, and what is to come of the corporate firm's relationship with its community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Sustainability Disclosures as a Financial Asset and Tool for Brand Management

Description

Sustainability disclosures have existed and been in use for over 20 years. Over the last century, corporate social responsibility ideals changed drastically from both the perspectives of consumers, investors, and

Sustainability disclosures have existed and been in use for over 20 years. Over the last century, corporate social responsibility ideals changed drastically from both the perspectives of consumers, investors, and corporations. Shifting from a start as an innovative initiative to now a crucial instrument in maintaining a public image and keeping up with competitors, sustainability can now be used to an economic benefit. The benefits of sustainability disclosure exist now as major factors of key performance indicators and major impactors of the bottom line.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Something Like Human

Description

Something Like Human explores corporate social responsibility through a triple lens, providing a content analysis using previous literature and history as the standards for evaluation. Section I reviews the history

Something Like Human explores corporate social responsibility through a triple lens, providing a content analysis using previous literature and history as the standards for evaluation. Section I reviews the history of corporate social responsibility and how it is currently understood and employed today. Section II turns its focus to a specific socially conscious corporation, Lush Cosmetics, examining its practices considering the concepts provided in Section I and performing a close analysis of its promotional materials. Section III consists of a mock marketing campaign designed for Lush in light of their social commitments. By the end of this thesis, the goal for the reader is to ask: Can major corporations be something like human?

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Quiet Impact: Investigating the Relationship Between Introversion and Commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility

Description

This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions

This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions and commitment to social responsibility both on an organizational and personal behavior level. Findings from the study show that introverts are not more likely than extroverts to prioritize social responsibility at work or through their personal lives. However, there is evidence in this study that introverts think about corporate social responsibility and its effects on business success in a different way than extroverts. Introverts focus on avoiding risk, and they may be more prone than extroverts to see business success and social responsibility as two opposing forces. Introverts also perceive a wider gap between the current state of prioritization for CSR responsibilities and what they feel this prioritization should be. This study has a number of practical implications for business leaders hoping to increase commitment to CSR within an organization while drawing on the strengths of each personality type. Recommendations for increasing commitment to CSR are based on survey findings and research from secondary sources.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Doing Good to Attract the Best: Corporate Social Responsibility and Recruiting

Description

With a new generation entering the workforce, a strong economy, and a low unemployment rate, the factors that new graduates value when looking for a job is changing. More new

With a new generation entering the workforce, a strong economy, and a low unemployment rate, the factors that new graduates value when looking for a job is changing. More new graduates and companies alike are working to adapt to this new environment. One way in which they are doing this is through being socially responsible. The purpose of this study is to research the extent to which an organization's Corporate Social Responsibility Programs impact a student’s desire to work for them. I aim to answer the question: how do the social responsibility efforts of companies impact college student’s willingness to work for a given company by looking at these programs on a micro level.

I gathered research by surveying undergraduate students at Arizona State University. The questions in this survey dealt with job search values, CSR knowledge, CSR interest and more. Throughout this survey, I largely focused on the differences between business and non-business students. There is evidence in this study to suggest that all groups of students value working for a socially responsible company, but business students are more familiar with these companies and more likely to research them. There is not a consensus on what companies students view to be socially responsible, but there are common factors in what students look for in a Corporate Social Responsibility program. This study has a number of practical implications for companies looking to attract the best talent based on their Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives. Recommendations are based on survey findings and research from secondary sources.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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An Analysis of the Impact of Female Leadership on Corporate Social Responsibility

Description

This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female

This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female leaders within the upper management (i.e. board of directors and CEOs) of S&P 500 firms. Since several studies identify a positive relationship between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, our case study of IBM and PepsiCo aims to provide a real-life framework to these theoretical models. Ultimately, our case study does align with the findings of those models, yet also provides a unique perspective as to the reasoning for the difference in CSR outcomes, citing business strategy as opposed to altruism and other-orientation. Due to our limited sample size, our findings do not empirically support this notion, but instead offers a potential area for further research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Next Generation Recruiting: Using Corporate Social Responsibility to Attract Top Talent

Description

Today’s job market favors the candidate as a result of the low unemployment rate in the United States. This requires companies to look beyond their typical recruiting techniques if they

Today’s job market favors the candidate as a result of the low unemployment rate in the United States. This requires companies to look beyond their typical recruiting techniques if they want to ensure they are hiring the best candidates after college in order to build their future leadership in the company. Throughout research for this thesis it became apparent that many of the recruiters surveyed during this study were not actively using Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in their recruiting tactics. In addition, a lot of the career pages of companies that actively recruit at Arizona State University do not even mention the topic. Throughout primary research of students that attend Arizona State University, surveys were able to draw conclusions on the type of students that prioritize Corporate Social Responsibility in their recruiting seasons. From these surveys, it was found that students with higher GPAs who are ethnically diverse, female, with more than one internship experience, or graduating within the next two years on average chose to prioritize Corporate Social Responsibility over other traditional “perks” of jobs. Following the collection of survey data, in order to get a more genuine understanding of what students are looking for, there was a focus group conducted with nine (9) W. P. Carey School of Business students. This allowed for there to be a guided conversation about Corporate Social Responsibility and allow students to share their feelings about the topic and how they prioritize it when looking for jobs. This, in combination with the surveys of recruiters and students, made it very clear about exactly the kind of students that recruiters should be targeting. Therefore, it has become apparent that if recruiters want to hire candidates who are more experienced, diverse, and with higher GPAs then they should be incorporating Corporate Social Responsibility into their recruiting techniques. Whether that is advertising it on their career pages and at career events, asking questions about it in interviews, or starting a conversation with students about it, this will allow recruiters to find those students with a genuine appreciation for the topic.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Its your responsibility: the impact of supply chain CSR performance on firm value

Description

Firms are increasingly being held accountable for the unsustainable actions of their suppliers. Stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and customers alike are calling for increased levels of transparency and higher standards of

Firms are increasingly being held accountable for the unsustainable actions of their suppliers. Stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and customers alike are calling for increased levels of transparency and higher standards of corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance for suppliers. While it is apparent that supplier performance is important, it remains unclear how the stock market weighs the CSR performance of a supplier relative to that of a focal firm. This dissertation focuses on whether these relative differences exist. In addition to capturing the magnitude of the difference in market impact between focal firm and supplier CSR events; I analyze the ways in which these differences have changed over time. To capture this evolution, CSR events ranging over a period from 1994 to 2013 are examined. This research utilizes an event study methodology in which the announcement of over 2,300 CSR events are identified and analyzed to determine the subsequent stock market reaction. I find that while the market evaluated negative supplier CSR events less harshly than events occurring at the buying firm in the early years of the sample, by the turn of the millennium this “supplier discounting" had disappeared. The analysis is broken down by CSR event "type". Findings demonstrate that negative CSR events, particularly those revolving around worker or customer safety, generate the most significant abnormal return. The findings of this dissertation produce valuable managerial insights along with interpretation. Resources are scarce, and understanding where a firm might best allocate their resources to avoid financial penalties will be valuable information for corporate decision makers. These findings present clear evidence that some of these resources should be allocated to supplier CSR performance, not just towards the CSR performance of the focal firm.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016