Matching Items (6)

131356-Thumbnail Image.png

New Barrett Poly Lounge and Residence Space: Research and Analysis of Student Preferences

Description

Abstract:
As Barrett Polytechnic moves into the final stages of planning for the new residential hall, currently under construction on the Polytechnic campus, it is important that they have the

Abstract:
As Barrett Polytechnic moves into the final stages of planning for the new residential hall, currently under construction on the Polytechnic campus, it is important that they have the student voice in mind when making final decisions. Past research has shown that students who live on campus have a higher retention rate not only through their first year, but onto graduation. Research has also found that students who live on campus become more involved in the community and use more of the university’s resources. Seeing that Barrett prides itself on being a community of scholars, proper use of student feedback should be used to prepare the new building for its students. Data was collected via a survey and focus group, focused primarily on what the students would like to see in their new space. Once collected and analyzed it was apparent that students were really concerned with a few aspects of the new residential building and lounge space.
Using the analyzed data, the following recommendations were made:
1. Reevaluation of the student residential experience after the move to the new residential building.
2. Revaluation of accessibility to the mentorship opportunities after the move to the residential building, as well as an increased movement by Barrett to foster these relationships
3. Addition of quantity of computers as well as newer technology, addition of whiteboards and charging stations, and ensuring there is proper group and individual workstations.
4. Consideration of what students use the lounge for and how to best set up the space for those uses.
5. More advertisement of the Barrett Polytechnic library as well as an more research to determine whether or not improving the library would encourage more use.
6. Make steps to keep the lounge open later in the evenings as well as ensuring students, both on and off campus, have access to the lounge amenities when they need them most.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

157654-Thumbnail Image.png

Increasing Student Engagement and Student Voice Through Collaborative Reflection

Description

In this study, the current literature regarding student engagement and student voice were reviewed to explore the connection between these two classroom elements. Currently, frequently incorporating student voice in

In this study, the current literature regarding student engagement and student voice were reviewed to explore the connection between these two classroom elements. Currently, frequently incorporating student voice in order to increase student engagement most commonly takes place at the high school and university levels. Thus, utilizing Finn’s (1989) participation-identification theory, this study set out to implement a practical design intervention in an elementary classroom to increase student engagement through the incorporation of student voice. Using Design-Based Research, I implemented a collaborative reflection process which allowed students, teacher/researcher, and co-educators to provide feedback on classroom task and participant structures. The feedback was then considered for further iterations of the task and participant structures. This was a pilot study of the collaborative reflection process and was implemented in a fourth-grade math classroom with 26 participants. Along with participating in the collaborative reflection process, the student participants also took a 26 question Learner Empowerment Measure to survey their feelings of identity with the classroom before and after the design intervention. After analyzing audio data gathered during the classroom tasks, as well as student feedback, it was found that student participation did increase due to the design intervention. However, there was no measurable difference in students’ feelings of identity with the classroom due to the collaborative reflection process. Future studies should consider implementing the collaborative reflection process in multiple classrooms across diverse activities during the school year.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

154830-Thumbnail Image.png

Re-framing the master narratives of dis/ability through an emotion lens: voices of Latina/o students with learning disabilities

Description

This study re-frames learning disabilities (LD) through the emotion-laden talk of four Latina/o students with LD. The research questions included: 1) What are the emotion-laden talk of Latina/o students about

This study re-frames learning disabilities (LD) through the emotion-laden talk of four Latina/o students with LD. The research questions included: 1) What are the emotion-laden talk of Latina/o students about being labeled with LD? 2) What are Latina/o students' emotion-laden talk of the idea of LD? I identified master narratives, the "pre-existent sociocultural forms of interpretation. They are meant to delineate and confine the local interpretation strategies and agency constellations in individual subjects as well as in social institutions," (Bamberg, 2004, p. 287) within the following literatures to inform my research questions and conceptual framework: a) historiography and interdisciplinary literature on LD; b) policy (i.e., Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)), c) the academic and d) social and emotional dimensions of LD; and e) student voice research with students with LD. Interdisciplinary, critical ethnographic and qualitative research methods such as taking into account issues of power, etic and emic perspectives, in-depth interviewing, field notes were used. Total participants included: four students, three parents and three teachers. More specifically, descriptive coding, identification of emotion-laden talk, a thematic analysis, memoing and intersectional and cultural-historical developmental constructs were used to analyze students’ emotion-laden talk. Emotion-laden talk about being labeled with LD included the hegemony of smartness, disability microaggressions, on the trinity of LD: help + teachers + literacy troubles, on being bullied, embarrassment to ask for assistance from others and help as hope. The emotion-laden talk about the idea of LD included LD as double-edge sword, LDness as X, the meaning of LD as resource, trouble with information processing, speech, and silence, the salience of the intersection of disability, ethnicity and language and other markers of difference, struggles due to lack of understanding and LD myths. This study provides a discussion and implications for theory, research, policy, and practice.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

157014-Thumbnail Image.png

School participatory budgeting and student voice

Description

One of the ideals underpinning public education in the United has been that of educating young people to become engaged democratic citizens. Civics courses have been the main, and sometimes

One of the ideals underpinning public education in the United has been that of educating young people to become engaged democratic citizens. Civics courses have been the main, and sometimes only, sign of public schools attending to their civic mission. An opportunity to offer citizenship education through the experience of democratic governance manifests itself through the implementation of school participatory budgeting. Though promising, the use of school participatory budgeting in the United States is relatively new. The literature is sparse and issues of process design as well as research methodology remain unexplored.

School participatory budgeting has the potential, at least, to offer students an opportunity to experience deliberative democratic decision-making and thus enhance those capabilities critical for effective citizenship. More ambitiously, school participatory budgeting presents an opportunity to delicately and steadily transform school governance to give real decision-making power to students.

The four stand-alone articles that make up this dissertation are four facets of a single case study on the first large-scale instance of school participatory budgeting in the United States. They began with the question: What were the accomplishments and challenges of school participatory budgeting in a large secondary school district in the Southwestern United States in its initial implementation?

This question was interpreted and answered differently in each article. The first article examines aspects of process design and how participatory budgeting might contribute not only to citizenship learning but also the expansion of student voice. The experiences of students, in the second article, and those of teachers and administrators, in the third article, are explored through analysis of interview data. The final article addresses this question by drawing on my own experience of implementing school participatory budgeting using analytic autoethnography. This dissertation presents school participatory budgeting from multiple perspectives and recommends more empirical research on the structure of the process before, during, and after implementation.

This dissertation examines this approach to citizenship learning dynamically by using various methodologies and bringing together the literature on student voice, citizenship learning, participatory budgeting, and curriculum studies in order to enrich the discussions and provide actionable knowledge for advocates and practitioners.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

155334-Thumbnail Image.png

Teachers taking action with student perception survey data

Description

As scrutiny of teacher effectiveness increases, there is a greater call for multiple instruments to measure teacher effectiveness and provide robust feedback to support teacher growth and development. Student perception

As scrutiny of teacher effectiveness increases, there is a greater call for multiple instruments to measure teacher effectiveness and provide robust feedback to support teacher growth and development. Student perception surveys, questionnaires completed by K-12 students about their teachers, have increasingly been used to evaluate teachers and provide feedback. Situated in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College (MLFTC) at Arizona State University, this action research study used Attribution Theory, Sensemaking Theory, and research on teacher emotion to 1) document the experiences of pre-service teachers as they related to the administration and subsequent results from a student perception survey (SPS), and 2) examine the influence of two online professional development modules created to prepare teachers for the SPS process and make sense of the results. Teacher candidates participated in the SPS process in their final, year-long residency. Results from the mixed-methods study provided evidence that pre-service teachers had both positive and negative experiences that were influenced by the SPS results they received from their students. Also, depending on the results they received, teacher candidates either attributed the cause of the results to themselves or to characteristics of their students. Results from the study also indicate that teacher candidates use few strategies to make sense of the results and used those strategies to varying degrees. Pre-service teachers indicated that they regarded the modules as helpful in the sense-making process. Furthermore, evidence indicates that pre-service teachers value their students’ feedback.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

156478-Thumbnail Image.png

Gifted second-graders' perceptions of teachers' expectations

Description

Research shows that teachers hold different expectations for different students and these varying expectations influence students’ academic performance (Good & Brophy, 1997; Jussim, Smith, Madon, & Palumbo, 1998; Rubie-Davies, 2007;

Research shows that teachers hold different expectations for different students and these varying expectations influence students’ academic performance (Good & Brophy, 1997; Jussim, Smith, Madon, & Palumbo, 1998; Rubie-Davies, 2007; Rubie-Davies, Hattie, Townsend, & Hamilton, 2007). Teachers form expectations of students based on personal beliefs about individuals’ capabilities (Rubie-Davies, 2015). Teachers’ differential expectations for students can have positive and negative influences on student learning opportunities and their future potential (Weinstein, 2002). The purpose of this action research study was to better understand if gifted second-graders perceive their teachers’ expectations and if there is a difference in their academic performance or classroom behavior. The research focused on observing and interpreting ideas from the perspectives and experiences of the six gifted second-graders. The innovation focused on the voice of the students in making change in their classroom environment. It focuses on classroom observations and reflections of the six participants to discuss their thoughts and feelings about their perceptions about their teachers’ expectations. The greater purpose behind the design of the innovation was to provide a space where students could share their thoughts, feelings, and ideas, without fear of punishment from their teachers. Participants shared their ideas through online selfie videos in order to inform teachers’ practice. Data were available from several sources including the Teacher Treatment Inventory questionnaires, transcriptions from interviews, and videotaped lessons. The study aimed to determine: (1) How do gifted second-graders perceive to understand and respond to the varying expectations of their teachers for their academic success? and, (2) How do the varying expectations of teachers’ impact the classroom learning of gifted second-graders? Findings suggest teachers with low expectations for their students establish a climate of failure, but teachers that value their students’ abilities create a climate of success. Students achieve more when their teachers have purposeful and clear expectations. As indicated by the literature, when teachers listen to student voice in classrooms, it improves students’ morale. Creating an inclusive social learning environment in a gifted classroom requires teachers to build their classrooms around student voice to enhance the supportive and caring environment (Fraser & Gestwicki, 2012).

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018