Matching Items (14)

134572-Thumbnail Image.png

Millennial Men vs. Modern American Society: A Male Generation of Angst, Disillusionment, and Love

Description

This thesis tackles the questions of what it means to be a Millennial man, and based upon that way of life, how one would best define Millennial masculinity. This thesis

This thesis tackles the questions of what it means to be a Millennial man, and based upon that way of life, how one would best define Millennial masculinity. This thesis is predominantly a creative project, although it is supported by a supplemental critical piece that analyzes the themes/topics and poetics behind the poetry. The thesis encompasses a collection of my original poetry relevant to the state of being a Millennial man. This manifestation of Millennial masculinity is observed through the lenses of three distinct themes in my poetry. The first theme is fiscal instability, relating to inheriting a bad economy after the Great Recession of 2008. This economic downturn caused many Millennial men to become too fiscally unstable to live autonomously, pursue their passions (careers they love), or comfortably date the partners they desire. The second theme relates to ambiguous dating and relationship norms that challenge Millennial men's ability and desire to date or commit to a partner. The third theme is in regards to Millennial men being seen by society as either stereotypically macho or overly effeminate. Frequently used poetics in this poetry include repetition and indentation. Both poetic techniques are used to create emphasis in the writing as well as to provide the reader with a deeper comprehension of the poems and their significance to the entire poetry collection. The ultimate goal of both the poetry and the analysis in this creative project is to help people better understand Millennial men, and to help Millennial men better understand and be true to themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

131269-Thumbnail Image.png

Marketing Masculinity: The Electric Motorcycle

Description

This research analyzes the masculine culture surrounding motorcycles to provide commentary on the appeal of electric motorcycles. More specifically, it examines the importance of masculine characteristics in advertising motorcycle

This research analyzes the masculine culture surrounding motorcycles to provide commentary on the appeal of electric motorcycles. More specifically, it examines the importance of masculine characteristics in advertising motorcycle identity. It analyzes the presented masculinity, to predict market sway, and the features necessary to create a compelling product. Through the analysis of commercials and websites for various motorcycle brands the target audience is discovered and used to predict the appeal of electric motorcycles. The presented masculinity is found to be targeting very specific populations of motorcyclists, where manufacturers believe electric motorcycles will be accepted most readily. Manufacturers are effectively entering the market through these demographics and can use them as a foothold to persuade others of the benefits of electric motorcycle technology.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

135730-Thumbnail Image.png

Makeup for Men? An Investigation into Social Norms and Motivation to Use Appearance-Enhancing Products

Description

This study aimed to extend beyond existing research on the male-grooming industry to examine the reality of marketing an everyday cosmetic product to men. This thesis contains a two-part original

This study aimed to extend beyond existing research on the male-grooming industry to examine the reality of marketing an everyday cosmetic product to men. This thesis contains a two-part original research study involving a qualitative, exploratory study (Study 1) clarifying college-aged men's attitudes toward male grooming products and makeup for men; and a quantitative, experimental study (Study 2) created to test theories developed from Study 1. Study 1 discovered a pattern among male participants of citing functional/medicinal qualities of male-grooming products as their justification for purchase. Study 2 tested whether this could be applied to makeup by comparing the effects of two advertisements for male cosmetic products on the likelihood of purchase of the product advertised. The main implications of this research suggest that one way to integrate makeup for men into the mainstream market is to release products in free trials before releasing them for sale, since men in the study were somewhat likely to use a free sample of the product in the test advertisements, but unwilling to purchase it. Additionally, the presence of acne in the participants moderated the effects of the ads such that men without acne were more likely to try a cosmetic product when presented with the medicinal benefits of the product in addition to the appearance-enhancing benefits, rather than appearance-enhancing benefits alone. Overall, men with acne were more willing than men without acne to use the product, regardless of the advertising appeal.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

136700-Thumbnail Image.png

The Case of the Contradiction: Proving the Paradoxes of Nancy Drew

Description

Since her debut in 1930, Nancy Drew has been an extremely popular character and icon for adolescent girls. Created by Edward Stratemeyer and developed by Mildred Wirt Benson and Harriet

Since her debut in 1930, Nancy Drew has been an extremely popular character and icon for adolescent girls. Created by Edward Stratemeyer and developed by Mildred Wirt Benson and Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, Nancy Drew continues to influence and inspire generations of readers. Readers are drawn to Nancy Drew's character and her ability to escape into the world of River Heights, away from the tumultuous climate of the Great Depression and ensuing wars. Significantly, Nancy Drew's enduring power and influence stems from five cultural and social paradoxes: child v. adult, masculine v. feminine, independent v. dependent, single v. couple, and classic v. modern. This thesis explores how throughout the series, Nancy embodies each extreme of these dualities, which gives her the power to be everything to everyone. Nancy derives power from these five paradoxes, which by definition are contradictory, but afford her special privileges in her fictional world. In embodying these binaries, Nancy Drew provides adolescent readers with an escape from and a role model for adolescence and future adulthood.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

136059-Thumbnail Image.png

The Restructuring of Masculinity The Rise of the Bromantic and Homosocial Culture

Description

Friendship between males have grown stronger throughout the last 20 years thanks to the production of buddy and bromance films. These movies have started to separate themselves from labels like

Friendship between males have grown stronger throughout the last 20 years thanks to the production of buddy and bromance films. These movies have started to separate themselves from labels like gay and straight. Feelings are no longer foreign and inaccessible to men, and this has led them to a greater understanding of themselves. Man is currently on the road that woman has been on for many years, that being of close knit friendships that resemble homosexual relationships; and even though this mimicry (or rather appropriation) has come at a much later time, man is now closer than ever to the tipping point for a new masculinity. Through philosophy, sociology, gender studies, social theory, psychoanalysis, and pop culture (specifically film and television) this paper reveals what bromance has already done and could potentially do for man and eventually for humanity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

158628-Thumbnail Image.png

(Re)Mapping the Border: Mobility and Survival Across a Geography of Borders

Description

This dissertation examines the San Diego border region to understand migrant construction worker’s mobility, autonomy, and labor power. San Diego County is enclosed by a network of internal immigration checkpoints

This dissertation examines the San Diego border region to understand migrant construction worker’s mobility, autonomy, and labor power. San Diego County is enclosed by a network of internal immigration checkpoints and roving patrol operations that constrain migrant worker’s labor power to the territorial boundaries of the county. The project uses ‘differential mobility’ as a strategic concept to highlight the ways in which borders differentiate, sort, and rank among noncitizen migrant construction workers to meet local labor demands. The project reveals worker’s collective struggle to evade and cross border enforcement operations to maintain consistent employment across a border region that is marked by internal immigration checkpoints, roving patrol stops, and state surveillance measures. In addition, the project examines migrant men’s emerging workplace narratives about the body and penetration that symbolize workers’ understanding of social domination in a global economy. These expressions open up a critical space from which migrant men begin to critique a global economy that drives men northbound for employment and southbound for retirement—inhibiting a future that is neither entirely in the United States or Mexico.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

151320-Thumbnail Image.png

Teddy Roosevelt, dandyism, and masculinities: a nominalist history of fitness centers in the United States

Description

In the latter half of the nineteenth century, colleges and universities transformed their thinking of the body as they institutionalized physical education, recreational activities, and especially physical exercise. In this

In the latter half of the nineteenth century, colleges and universities transformed their thinking of the body as they institutionalized physical education, recreational activities, and especially physical exercise. In this study, I examine the historical discourse on physical exercise and training during this period. I employ the theoretical and methodological practices of Michel Foucault's archeological and genealogical work to write a "history of the present." I challenge the essential narrative of physical fitness on college and university campuses. I also discuss nineteenth century notions of ethics and masculinity as a way of understanding twenty-first century ethics and masculinity. Ultimately, I use the historical discourse to argue that institutionalization of recreation and fitness centers and activities have less to do with health and well-being and more to do with disciplining bodies and controlling individuals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

151472-Thumbnail Image.png

At home in the world: masculinity, maturation, and domestic space in the Caribbean Bildungsroman

Description

This project examines C.L.R. James, V.S. Naipaul, and George Lamming's appropriation of the European Bildungsroman, a novel depicting the maturation of the hero prompted by his harmonious dialectical relationship with

This project examines C.L.R. James, V.S. Naipaul, and George Lamming's appropriation of the European Bildungsroman, a novel depicting the maturation of the hero prompted by his harmonious dialectical relationship with the social realm (Bildung). I contend that James, Naipaul, and Lamming use the Bildungsroman genre to critique colonialism's effects on its subjects, particularly its male subjects who attend colonial schools that present them with disconcerting curricula and gender ideologies that hinder their intellectual and social development. Disingenuously cloaked in paternalistic rhetoric promising the advancement of "uncivilized" peoples, colonialism, these novels show, actually impedes the development of its subjects. Central to these writers' critiques is the use of houses, space, and land. Although place functions differently in Minty Alley, A House for Mr. Biswas, and In the Castle of My Skin, the novels under consideration here, the corresponding relationship between a mature, autonomous self and a home of one's own is made evident in each. Tragically, the men in these novels are never able to find communities in which they cease to feel out of place, nor are they ever able to find secure domestic spaces. Because the discourse of home so closely parallels the discourse of Bildung, I contend that the protagonists' inability to find stable housing suggests the inaccessibility of Bildung in a colonized space. Further, I assert that this literal homelessness is symbolic of the educated male's cultural exile; he is unable to find a location where he can live in dialectical harmony with any community, which is the ideal aim of Bildung. Leaving the Caribbean proves to be the colonized male's only strategy for pursuing Bildung; thus, these novels suggest that while Bildung is impossible in the Caribbean, it is not impossible for the Caribbean subject.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

158237-Thumbnail Image.png

An Investigation of Gender Norm Resistance

Description

The aim of this dissertation was to explore the construct and experiences of gender norm resistance (GNR) using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The purpose of Study 1 was to

The aim of this dissertation was to explore the construct and experiences of gender norm resistance (GNR) using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The purpose of Study 1 was to standardize and universalize what is already known about GNR by creating a quantitative GNR measure. In so doing, I operationalized the implicit and explicit GNR framework described by Way and colleagues (2014). On a sample of adolescents (484 6th grade students; girls = 234; 10-13 years old, Mage = 11.44 years, SD = .56) the GNR measure was tested for gender differences and to explore how GNR aligns with and differs from other constructs related to gender identity and peer relations. The results supported the two-factor model (implicit and explicit forms of GNR), supported convergent and discriminant validity, and identified mean level differences depending on GNR form, gender, ethnic identity, and gender typicality. The purpose of Study 2 was to explore why young men resist gender norms, what motivates their acts of resistance, and how they understand those motives. I expected that implicit GNR would be motivated by the pursuit of authentic nonconformity and would involve an awareness of norms, feeling gender atypical, and authenticity. I expected that explicit GNR would be motivated by a dislike of gender norms, and that it would involve an awareness of, dislike of, and pressure to conform to gender norms. The results supported these expectations and indicated a subtype of GNR, activist GNR, defined by the desire to change gender norms to benefit the social group. Both studies rely on the resistance/accommodation framework to describe the balance of conformity and resistance as individuals navigate systems of power and oppression.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

158607-Thumbnail Image.png

The Masculine Overcompensation Theory: A Gender Perspective on Teacher Reactions to Transgender Bullying

Description

Teachers represent important agents of gender socialization in schools and play a critical role in the lived experiences of transgender students. What remains less clear, however, is whether the gender

Teachers represent important agents of gender socialization in schools and play a critical role in the lived experiences of transgender students. What remains less clear, however, is whether the gender of the teacher impacts their response to transgender bullying and specifically how threats to gender identity might influence men who teach to respond negatively. The current study used a 2 (gender) x 3 (gender identity threat, no gender identity threat, and control) experimental design to assess whether the masculine overcompensation theory helps explain how men who teach respond to transgender victimization experiences. It was hypothesized that men in the gender identity threat condition would endorse more anti-trans attitudes (e.g., higher transphobic attitudes, lower allophilia [feelings of liking] toward transgender individuals, more traditional gender roles, less supportive responses to a vignette about transgender bullying, less support for school practices that support transgender students, and less likelihood of signing a petition supporting transgender youth rights) compared to the other conditions. It was also expected that they would endorse more negative affect but higher feelings of self-assurance. Women in the study served as a comparison group as no overcompensation effect is expected for them. Participants (N = 301) were nationally recruited through word of mouth, social media, and personal networks. Results from the current study did not support the theory of masculine overcompensation as there was no effect of threatening feedback. There were a number of significant gender differences. Men reported lower transgender allophilia, higher transphobia, more traditional gender role beliefs, less likelihood of signing the petition supporting transgender youth rights, and more self-assurance than women. No gender effect was found for negative affect or support for school practices supporting transgender students. There were also no observable differences in participant responses to the vignette by gender or condition. The implications and limitations of the current study were discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020