Matching Items (7)

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Art as an Invitation to World-Traveling: A Psycho-Theoretical Approach to Understanding Neuro-atypicality

Description

Caring for others is hard work, it takes time, it takes emotional labor, and ultimately it is not immediately apparent how caring for others helps ourselves, so why should we

Caring for others is hard work, it takes time, it takes emotional labor, and ultimately it is not immediately apparent how caring for others helps ourselves, so why should we do it? In caring for others, we become an active participant in the world of another, and we must take this active role because we already have an emotional investment in the wellbeing of the other. We must care for others because we already care about them. This concept of caring for others is addressed in Art as an invitation to world-traveling: a psycho-analytic approach to Understanding neuro-atypicality as well as a corresponding gallery featuring the artwork analyzed within the written work. In this work the act of World-Sharing is discussed, an idea brought to us by the philosopher Maria Lugones. The idea is that we create worlds by having relationships with others. We have worlds that we live in with our family, our workplace, our circles of friends, and smaller worlds between us and those we are closest to and ourselves. We are world-travelers, evidenced by our ability to empathize with others, and through this thesis we can become able to use art as a means of world-traveling. Art has a unique way of creating a way with which we can understand the other without the use of words, as verbal language isn't the only path to world-traveling. In the first section of this work, there is an introduction. In sections two through four the philosophical importance of expressive and empathetic communication, the psychological standpoint including how neuro-atypical people are already attempting to share their world with others by utilizing therapy, and an analysis of artwork by neuro-atypical artists are discussed. Section two utilizes the concept of world-sharing brought to us by Maria Lugones, the concept of therapy as a way to care for others and develop relationships, as well as the importance of love as it related to caring by Carol Gilligan, the way that language can be used to form these relationships by Hans-Georg Gadamer, and the way that language lends itself to communication and the creation of worlds by Georges Gusdorf. In this section the importance of the social majority, or those who hold social power, to travel to the world to the minority, because the minority in order to exist in society already travels to the world of the majority is discussed. In the third section how neuro-atypical people attempt to travel to the world of the majority by utilizing therapy and at times the importance of artwork in that therapy is discussed as well as the art therapy called SEAT which utilizes viewing the patients as artists first in order to have a more dynamic and influential intervention.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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A Mechanistic Model of Art Therapy

Description

The goal of my study is to test the overarching hypothesis that art therapy is effective because it targets emotional dysregulation that often accompanies significant health stressors. By reducing the

The goal of my study is to test the overarching hypothesis that art therapy is effective because it targets emotional dysregulation that often accompanies significant health stressors. By reducing the salience of illness-related stressors, art therapy may improve overall mood and recovery, particularly in patients with cancer. After consulting the primary literature and review papers to develop psychological and neural mechanisms at work in art therapy, I created a hypothetical experimental procedure to test these hypotheses to explain why art therapy is helpful to patients with chronic illness. Studies found that art therapy stimulates activity of multiple brain regions involved in memory retrieval and the arousal of emotions. I hypothesize that patients with chronic illness have a reduced capacity for emotion regulation, or difficulty recognizing, expressing or altering illness-related emotions (Gross & Barrett, 2011). Further I hypothesize that art therapy improves mood and therapeutic outcomes by acting on the emotion-processing regions of the limbic system, and thereby facilitating the healthy expression of emotion, emotional processing, and reappraisal. More mechanistically, I propose art therapy reduces the perception or salience of stressors by reducing amygdala activity leading to decreased activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The art therapy literature and my hypothesis about its mechanisms of action became the basis of my proposed study. To assess the effectiveness of art therapy in alleviating symptoms of chronic disease, I am specifically targeting patients with cancer who exhibit a lack of emotional regulation. Saliva is collected 3 times a week on the day of intervention: morning after waking, afternoon, and evening. Stress levels are tested using one-hour art therapy sessions over the course of 3 months. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) assesses an individual's perceived stress and feelings in past and present situations, for the control and intervention group. To measure improvement in overall mood, 10 one-hour art sessions are performed on patients over 10 weeks. A one-hour discussion analyzing the participants' artwork follows each art session. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) assesses overall mood for the intervention and control groups. I created rationale and predictions based on the intended results of each experiment.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Proposal for Bachelor of Fine Art-Art Therapy (BFA-AT) at Arizona State University

Description

Degree seeking artists require assurance that they will be able to make a difference in the art world, and make a living while impacting others with their art. The

Degree seeking artists require assurance that they will be able to make a difference in the art world, and make a living while impacting others with their art. The balance between a commissioned artist and an art teacher is art therapy; with either employment within medical institutions or a self-employed health-care provider. The Bachelor of Fine Art - Art Therapy Concentration (BFA-AT) degree, though currently not present at ASU, may be obtainable for students seeking a pathway to graduate school. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Projections Department, the specific job opportunities in the field of health-care therapists estimate 21,800 employees nationwide with projections of 33,100 in the year 2028; estimated increase of over 11,000 positions are projected to open within the next eight years. These projections were calculated prior to COVID-19 and must be revisited due to the psychopathology of our nation and the globe. A Major MAPP ( Maricopa To ASU Pathway Program) for first year and transfer students has been outlined in this research paper to assist in enrollment. The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) acknowledges and refers potential students to the universities and colleges offering the BFA-AT programs. Further, if ASU adopts the BFA-AT program, theirs will be the only program in the Western U.S., and third in the Central U.S.—out of 16 nationwide programs.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Art of Healing

Description

Art is an ancient, personal, and cultural phenomenon used to convey human creativity and emotion. Dating back as early as 40,000 years in Indonesian cave paintings, this medium has been

Art is an ancient, personal, and cultural phenomenon used to convey human creativity and emotion. Dating back as early as 40,000 years in Indonesian cave paintings, this medium has been used to record stories, histories, and shape cultural opinion throughout the history of mankind. While we have witnessed the rise and fall of types of art in popular culture and traditions, the core of art remains the same, which is to express the imagery within the human mind into a tangible form. As such, this allows for the candid acknowledgement and projection of an individual’s state of being into a productive, expressive skill which reaps therapeutic benefits.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Full Disclosure: A BFA Painting Exhibition Documenting the Transformative Nature of Art Therapy

Description

Full Disclosure, an honors thesis painting exhibition presented by Bachelor of Fine Arts candidate, Natalie Saez, strives to visually document the mental progression of people undergoing the transformative process of

Full Disclosure, an honors thesis painting exhibition presented by Bachelor of Fine Arts candidate, Natalie Saez, strives to visually document the mental progression of people undergoing the transformative process of art therapy. Although often times a term that brings people on edge under certain circumstances, full disclosure brings to light information that otherwise would not have been expressed. In this same way, the process of art making - specifically referring to art therapy - presents a form of full disclosure. Varying stylistic approaches ranging from naturalistic to more abstracted portraits within the exhibition serve as a way to depict the uninhibited expression that results from the creative process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Effectiveness of Art Therapy as an Anxiety Reducer with Homeless Young Adults in a Sex Trafficking Psycho-Education Group

Description

This study was conducted to look at the possible effects of art intervention on anxiety levels of homeless young adults in a local drop-in shelter. While there is a fair

This study was conducted to look at the possible effects of art intervention on anxiety levels of homeless young adults in a local drop-in shelter. While there is a fair amount of literature on art intervention and its applicability with vulnerable populations, its specific effect on anxiety has not been extensively examined. Researchers conducted two art interventions where state-trait anxiety (STAI Inventory) was measured before and after the interventions. Researchers hypothesized that anxiety would decrease after the art sessions. Some significant results were found. Participants reported feeling less strained (p = .041), worrying less over possible misfortunes (p = .02), feeling less nervous (p = .007) and feeling more decisive (p = .001). Future research recommendations are discussed.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Art Therapy for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

Description

In the United States, many new cases of type I diabetes appear among youth. Upon diagnosis, many patients experience psychosocial issues in addition to physical issues, including depression, anxiety, and

In the United States, many new cases of type I diabetes appear among youth. Upon diagnosis, many patients experience psychosocial issues in addition to physical issues, including depression, anxiety, and poor self-esteem. Diabetes educators have found that it is important to form interpersonal connections and trust with their adolescent patients. One tool that may be particularly useful for diabetes educators to implement is art therapy, which combines creativity and problem solving in a practical manner. Art therapy may be particularly helpful for individuals with type 1 diabetes because of the great cognitive and emotional changes, which occur during adolescence. In order for caretakers and educators to implement tenants of art therapy, it is helpful to have a medium, such as an art journal, which provides a foundation on which to process the emotions and thoughts the adolescent is experiencing as they process diabetes and their feelings throughout diagnosis. Keywords: art therapy, type I diabetes

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05