Matching Items (7)

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Right Then

Description

A collection of poems concentrating on 15 small moments, tied together to explore the ardor, tensions, and fragility a relationship. Conceptions of language, teeth, domesticated dogs, and a car accident recur throughout the manuscript as a means of navigating this

A collection of poems concentrating on 15 small moments, tied together to explore the ardor, tensions, and fragility a relationship. Conceptions of language, teeth, domesticated dogs, and a car accident recur throughout the manuscript as a means of navigating this narrative and of questioning the role of memory in our lives.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Comparing the Compressive Strength Between Decayed and Healthy Teeth

Description

This study was conducted to determine the difference in compressive strength between decayed and healthy teeth. The teeth were subjected to a compressive force to simulate the process of mastication. This was done to show that healthy teeth would be

This study was conducted to determine the difference in compressive strength between decayed and healthy teeth. The teeth were subjected to a compressive force to simulate the process of mastication. This was done to show that healthy teeth would be better at handling these compressive forces since they have more enamel. 26 teeth samples were collected (19 molars, 4 canines, and 3 premolars) evenly distributed between healthy and decayed. The samples were dimensionally analyzed using electronic calipers and then categorized as either decayed or healthy. The samples were then placed in a nut bolt with epoxy so that the samples could be compressed. Each sample was recorded on video while they were being exposed to the compressive force. This was done to observe how the samples were coming in contact with the Shimadzu compression machine. The amount of force that was required for the samples to exhibit the first point of breakage was recorded by the machine in pounds of force. Various analyses were conducted to determine relationships between several variables. The results showed that as the total and occlusal surface area increased, so did the amount of force the samples could absorb before breakage. As the machine came in contact with more cusps among the molar samples, those samples were able to absorb a larger compressive force. The average force that the decayed and healthy molar samples endured before breakage was roughly even, with the decayed samples average being slightly greater.

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Date Created
2021-05

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Waxing Teeth: Creating Anatomically and Functionally Correct 3D Dental Models

Description

What does it mean to wax a tooth? Creating dental wax-ups is a procedure utilized across the field of dentistry among professionals, lab technicians, and even dental students. The process of waxing a tooth involves many steps, instruments, and knowledge

What does it mean to wax a tooth? Creating dental wax-ups is a procedure utilized across the field of dentistry among professionals, lab technicians, and even dental students. The process of waxing a tooth involves many steps, instruments, and knowledge of dental anatomy. To simplify, waxing a tooth involves utilizing dental wax and heat to create a three dimensional model of a specific tooth and its anatomy. This process is often used in education of dental students in an attempt to teach essential skills needed in a dental career. Dental waxing can help students learn specific anatomical differences between teeth and how varying teeth work together aesthetically and functionally (Abdalla 2018). This process involves diving into characteristics of teeth involving heights of contour, convex and concave surfaces, marginal ridges, embrasures, and point angles. Such skills and knowledge, as mentioned by Dr. Ticole Nguyen, were essential in her education at Texas A&M’s Baylor College of Dentistry. More specifically, Dr. Nguyen stated not only does learning how to create wax ups aide students in development of their anatomical understanding, but it also provides opportunities to prepare for future procedures such as fillings and creating crowns. When a waxed up tooth is complete, it is referenced as a “working model.” The term working model is not just a term, but carries with it the detail and thought required to create a functioning and visually accurate tooth - a tooth that works (Nguyen 2015).

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Date Created
2019-05

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Morphological and Development Analysis of Teeth Recovered from an Archaeological Teratoma

Description

Teratomas are germ cell tumors that can generate a broad spectrum of biological tissues including: hair, oil glands, bones, and teeth. Little research has focused on the detailed comparison of teeth from growing within teratomas to teeth that grew normally

Teratomas are germ cell tumors that can generate a broad spectrum of biological tissues including: hair, oil glands, bones, and teeth. Little research has focused on the detailed comparison of teeth from growing within teratomas to teeth that grew normally within the oral cavity. Broad similarities in the overall pattern of dental growth have previously been observed using average enamel thickness, a measurement of enamel height, comparisons. Enamel thickness is used to infer functional aspects of dentition. Relative enamel thickness values have not been used in previous studies to account for the difference in size of the teeth.

ASU’s Bioarchaeology of Nubia Expedition (BONE) led by Dr. Brenda Baker discovered the remains of a female individual from the Classic Kerma period with a preserved large teratoma containing hard tissue components including two molariform teeth. There are only three previous recorded instances of teratomas in a paleopathological setting.

This study analyzed the characteristics of teeth found within a teratoma and compared them to permanent oral dentition to ascertain the degree to which dental development is affected by local growth environment. Permanent (oral) molars from multiple individuals and 2 teratoma teeth from a singular individual from the BONE site were analyzed alongside a comparative sample of permanent (oral) molars from an unrelated, more modern population. MicroCT scans were used to create digital renditions of the teeth to create 3D and 2D models to analyze the enamel and dentine of the teeth to measure their morphological characteristics. The relative enamel thickness and the absolute occlusal enamel volumes were calculated. The study found that there are significant differences in enamel thickness between the teratoma teeth and any of its oral cavity counterparts.

This study is unique in that it is the first study to analyze teeth from a teratoma to permanent teeth from the oral cavity using 2D and 3D digital dental models created from microCT data. It is also the first study to analyze these morphological characteristics in an archaeological sample.

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Date Created
2019-12

Root Canal Therapy: Understanding the Foundations of Endodontic Diagnosis and Treatment

Description

My thesis consisted of both a self-directed study and a creative project. I worked with Dr. Michael Grabow, an endodontist of 20 years, to understand the scientific and technical aspects of root canal therapy. The first phase of the thesis

My thesis consisted of both a self-directed study and a creative project. I worked with Dr. Michael Grabow, an endodontist of 20 years, to understand the scientific and technical aspects of root canal therapy. The first phase of the thesis was a review of dental biology, tooth development, morphology, physiology, radiology, and endodontics. The second phase was the creative project in which I learned the technical process of performing a root canal. In this phase, I observed Dr. Grabow execute root canal therapy on live patients and extracted teeth (obtained from an oral surgeon). I then completed root canals of my own on extracted teeth, under the instruction and oversight of Dr. Grabow.

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Created

Date Created
2020-12

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In a new light: early x-ray technology in dentistry, 1890-1955

Description

A dental exam in twenty-first century America generally includes the taking of radiographs, which are x-ray images of the mouth. These images allow dentists to see structures below the gum line and within the teeth. Having a patient's radiographs on

A dental exam in twenty-first century America generally includes the taking of radiographs, which are x-ray images of the mouth. These images allow dentists to see structures below the gum line and within the teeth. Having a patient's radiographs on file has become a dental standard of care in many states, but x-rays were only discovered a little over 100 years ago. This research analyzes how and why the x-ray image has become a ubiquitous tool in the dental field. Primary literature written by dentists and scientists of the time shows that the x-ray was established in dentistry by the 1950s. Therefore, this thesis tracks the changes in x-ray technological developments, the spread of information and related safety concerns between 1890 and 1955. X-ray technology went from being an accidental discovery to a device commonly purchased by dentists. X-ray information started out in the form of the anecdotes of individuals and led to the formation of large professional groups. Safety concerns of only a few people later became an important facet of new devices. These three major shifts are described by looking at those who prompted the changes; they fall into the categories of people, technological artifacts and institutions. The x-ray became integrated into dentistry as a product of the work of people such as C. Edmund Kells, a proponent of dental x-rays, technological improvements including faster film speed, and the influence of institutions such as Victor X-Ray Company and the American Dental Association. These changes that resulted established a strong foundation of x-ray technology in dentistry. From there, the dental x-ray developed to its modern form.

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Date Created
2013

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Development, evolution, and teeth: how we came to explain the morphological evolution of the mammalian dentition

Description

This dissertation begins to lay out a small slice of the history of morphological research, and how it has changed, from the late 19th through the close of the 20th century. Investigators using different methods, addressing different questions, holding different

This dissertation begins to lay out a small slice of the history of morphological research, and how it has changed, from the late 19th through the close of the 20th century. Investigators using different methods, addressing different questions, holding different assumptions, and coming from different research fields have pursued morphological research programs, i.e. research programs that explore the process of changing form. Subsequently, the way in which investigators have pursued and understood morphology has witnessed significant changes from the 19th century to modern day research. In order to trace this shifting history of morphology, I have selected a particular organ, teeth, and traced a tendril of research on the dentition beginning in the late 19th century and ending at the year 2000. But even focusing on teeth would be impossible; the scope of research on this organ is far too vast. Instead, I narrow this dissertation to investigation of research on a particular problem: explaining mammalian tooth morphology. How researchers have investigated mammalian tooth morphology and what counts as an explanation changed dramatically during this period.

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Date Created
2017