Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

134275-Thumbnail Image.png

The Elusive Social Media Generation and Their Opinions on Organ Donation

Description

Organ, cornea and tissue donation is a widespread public health need that has high rates of public approval, but lower rates of action. In Arizona, an individual can register as an organ donor at 15 years and six months old,

Organ, cornea and tissue donation is a widespread public health need that has high rates of public approval, but lower rates of action. In Arizona, an individual can register as an organ donor at 15 years and six months old, and this ever-growing demographic is a hard-to-influence, yet important part of the pool of registered donors. There are many factors that serve to influence or dissuade adolescents from registering, and it is the duty of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) and others involved in the donation process to appeal to this audience. This undergraduate research project explores the overall idea of what makes someone register as an organ, cornea and tissue donor by looking into several factors of the decision-making process, such as social media usage and engagement, hesitation or support surrounding spiritual beliefs, and how personal opinions and beliefs shape views and action toward organ donation. Based on the data collected, the researcher found relationships between the registration status of adolescents and their social media use, spiritual beliefs and personal relationships and opinions.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-05

136645-Thumbnail Image.png

The Shooting Cycle and Publicity: An Examination of State Legislator Voting Patterns and Political Transparency Before and After a Mass Shooting

Description

This study looks to answer whether or not citizens have reason to believe the publicity statements from state government officials when speaking about gun-control laws during the time surrounding mass shootings. Citizens in America see the same, consistent pattern that

This study looks to answer whether or not citizens have reason to believe the publicity statements from state government officials when speaking about gun-control laws during the time surrounding mass shootings. Citizens in America see the same, consistent pattern that politicians use mass shootings for, known as "The Shooting Cycle." Here, we will research whether or not these politicians are continuing to keep the same voting pattern that they have had in the past, in terms of gun control. This case study uses quantitative research to discover that almost all state representative and senators have consistent voting patterns when it comes to gun control legislation, regardless of time distances around mass shootings. We will then seek out seek out public statements and relevant periodicals and media clips in order to determine whether or not these voting patterns align with the public's perception of a politician's stance on gun control. It also uses qualitative research to discover that publicity from senators and representatives that support gun rights have more consistency in their public statements than those who are either inconsistent or consistently vote for gun control legislation. This study creates opportunities for new research in voting patterns and political transparency on state officials and the significant effects of mass shootings on public opinions and public statements from state officials.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-05