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The Relationship between Internalization of the Model Minority Myth and Critical Consciousness among Asian American College Students

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Objective: This study examined how the belief (internalization) in the model minority myth of achievement orientation and of unrestricted mobility relates to one’s social awareness of racial inequity and inequality in society (critical consciousness) amongst Asian American college students. Methods:

Objective: This study examined how the belief (internalization) in the model minority myth of achievement orientation and of unrestricted mobility relates to one’s social awareness of racial inequity and inequality in society (critical consciousness) amongst Asian American college students. Methods: Participants (N = 275, 67.7% female, M_age = 22.35) were recruited from Asian American ethnic studies classes, clubs and organizations and completed an online cross-sectional survey. Results: Results indicated that internalization of achievement orientation significantly correlated with levels of racial critical consciousness while unrestricted mobility did not. Conclusion: These findings extend research exploring the correlates of critical consciousness on internalization of racial stereotypes for Asian Americans.

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2019-05

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A Look into Media Trends and Influences on Public Perception of Crime

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This research examines popular culture’s influence on public perceptions of criminality and criminal justice reform. I have a two-pronged focus: first, I examine how specific cultural texts present criminal behavior, policing, and the criminal justice system; second, I show how

This research examines popular culture’s influence on public perceptions of criminality and criminal justice reform. I have a two-pronged focus: first, I examine how specific cultural texts present criminal behavior, policing, and the criminal justice system; second, I show how these texts’ portrayals of criminal behavior, policing, and the criminal justice system, influence public perceptions about criminal justice reform. Throughout the era of filmmaking and the heightened growth of media consumption, the representation of crime and criminals has had a profound presence in film and media, but with little guidance or fact-checking from the general public and its creators (Welsh, Fleming and Dowler, 2011). Despite this, public perception of the law and reality continues to find its line being constantly blurred, with legal theorist, Richard Sherwin asserting that “The majority of American citizens form their opinions about the criminal justice system through the mass media, and more often than not, from fictional accounts of the trial process” (Alford, 2000). This in turn leads to a culture of preconceived notions that later form into political and social opinions with an unknown negative bias against reform efforts and legal accuracy (Sarat, 2015).

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2020-05

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Nopal En La Frente"": Latino(s) Perceptions of Disorder and Neighborhood Ethnicity

Description

Wilson and Kelling's (1982) broken windows theory (BWT) says that disorder causes crime at the neighborhood level. More specifically, this theory posits that perceptions of disorder increase fear of crime, which then reduces community involvement, making crime more likely. Recent

Wilson and Kelling's (1982) broken windows theory (BWT) says that disorder causes crime at the neighborhood level. More specifically, this theory posits that perceptions of disorder increase fear of crime, which then reduces community involvement, making crime more likely. Recent studies show that race plays a pivotal role in people's perceptions of disorder. In short, people tend to associate race with low socioeconomic status, high arrest rates, and lack of policing. Therefore, race plays a central role in the BWT framework as it is linked to perceptions of disorder and crime. However, ethnicity is less well understood when analyzing the perceptions of disorder. To explore this further, the current study examines Latino responses regarding safety and ethnicity to a photograph depicting a religious mural of importance for the Mexican community (La Virgen de Guadalupe). This paper qualitatively analyzes a sample of 299 survey responses of undergraduate Latino students to better understand how Latinos recognize and identify their own culture/heritage and disorder. Implications for understanding ethnicity and broken windows theory are discussed.

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2015-05

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'Whites Have Nothing to Do With It': A rhetorical analysis of hegemonic racial discourse

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This is an analysis of broad racial discourse through a critical race theory: Responsibility Avoidance Discourse (RAD). RAD is coded English that communicates meaning through connotation, avoidance, and implication as a means of securing its main purposes: enforcing white supremacy,

This is an analysis of broad racial discourse through a critical race theory: Responsibility Avoidance Discourse (RAD). RAD is coded English that communicates meaning through connotation, avoidance, and implication as a means of securing its main purposes: enforcing white supremacy, obscuring inequality, and hindering significant racial progress. RAD is extremely effective at directing discussion away from arguments that might induce self-reflexivity or question white privilege. It focuses on discrediting others as a means of legitimizing whiteness. I analyze examples of it from a variety of sources—from political discourse to media coverage and social media trends—to demonstrate its manifestations throughout society.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Parental Expectations and Future Pathways to Success

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Expectation for college attendance in the United States continues to rise as more jobs require degrees. This study aims to determine how parental expectations affect high school students in their decision to attend college. By examining parental expectations that were

Expectation for college attendance in the United States continues to rise as more jobs require degrees. This study aims to determine how parental expectations affect high school students in their decision to attend college. By examining parental expectations that were placed on current college students prior to and during the application period, we can determine the positive and negative outcomes of these expectations as well as the atmosphere they are creating. To test the hypothesis, an online survey was distributed to current ASU and Barrett, Honors College students regarding their experience with college applications and their parents' influence on their collegiate attendance. A qualitative analysis of the data was conducted in tandem with an analysis of several case studies to determine the results. These data show that parental expectations are having a significant impact on the enrollment of high school students in college programs. With parents placing these expectations on their children, collegiate enrollment will continue to increase. Further studies will be necessary to determine the specific influences these expectations are placing on students.

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Date Created
2021-05

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The Case for Diversity in the Tech Workplace

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Do more diverse teams create better outcomes, creatively and fiscally? Why do heterogeneous groups think more innovatively and create products that reach a wider audience? Diverse teams bring unique perspectives that force individuals to reimagine their world views and question

Do more diverse teams create better outcomes, creatively and fiscally? Why do heterogeneous groups think more innovatively and create products that reach a wider audience? Diverse teams bring unique perspectives that force individuals to reimagine their world views and question what they know. This thesis focuses on the benefits of increased racial and gender diversity in the workplace. There is a dramatic difference in the number of women and people of color in tech companies generally, in STEM roles, and in leadership roles. The benefits of diverse teams (along all axis) is indisputable, yet companies still fight diversifying their employee base. Diversity in the workplace dramatically impacts the bottom line, but it is also incredibly important from a human rights perspective. The first step to reflecting the population's diversity ratio at all levels of business is educating the future leaders of America to its importance, both as a social justice initiative and a capitalistic one as well. I created and hosted a panel with local tech entrepreneurs and investors to discuss gender diversity, the struggles being a woman in business and solutions moving forward.

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Date Created
2016-12