Matching Items (15)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

133665-Thumbnail Image.png

Eat In, Not Out: A Comparative Analysis Between at Home Cooking and Restaurant Dining

Description

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this information with our peers to potentially influence them to make a healthy lifestyle change. The first step was to determine the factors that influence college-aged students eating habits, and was presented with a review of relevant literature in several topics. We researched food literacy in young adults, the impact of fast food, social media's role in healthy eating habits, health behavior change in young adults, and the benefits of home cooking to obtain a general baseline of the knowledge of college-aged students. The initial research was utilized to write more effective blog posts that appropriately addressed our targeted demographic and to determine what platforms would be most appropriate to convey our information. These ideas were taken and then translated into a blog and Instagram account that contained healthy, copycat recipes of popular restaurant meals. We wrote 30 blog posts which were made up of 20 original recipes, 8 nutrition informational posts, and an introduction/conclusion. Finally, a focus group was hosted to ascertain the opinions of our peers, and to determine if they would be willing to make a lifestyle change in the form of cooking more frequently as opposed to eating out regularly. We provided them with a pre and post survey to gather their opinions before and after reviewing the findings of our research and project. We concluded that if given the information in an accessible way, college students are willing to eat in, not out.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2018-05

Nutrition Education Video Series for the Improvement of Arizona State University Student Health

Description

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which information is true and which advice they will follow. During this time of growth and learning, it is essential that students have access to accurate information that will help them to be healthier individuals for years to come. The goal of this project was to provide students with an easily accessible and reliable resource for nutrition information that was presented in a simple and relatable way. The following videos and attached materials were created in response to ASU student needs and will be available for students on the ASU wellness website. Eating Healthy on a Budget: https://youtu.be/H-IUArD0phY Healthy Choices at Fast Food Restaurants: https://youtu.be/ZxcjBblpRtM Quick Healthy Meals: https://youtu.be/7uIDFe15-dM

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-12

134478-Thumbnail Image.png

Paddle With A Purpose: A Synthesis on My Perspective on Cultivating an Intentional Life of Happiness

Description

Happiness is an enormously broad topic that has recently gained momentum in the workplace, literature, media and society. There are many interconnected topics and themes contributing to the overall state of being happy. In my book, I dive into the

Happiness is an enormously broad topic that has recently gained momentum in the workplace, literature, media and society. There are many interconnected topics and themes contributing to the overall state of being happy. In my book, I dive into the most important topics that contribute to daily and global happiness. Each of the following topics are explored within the evidence-based literature and juxtaposed with my own life experience and perspective. First, I will explore society’s impact on happiness. Society shapes our perspective more than we realize, so it is important to debunk what rings true to us individually and what does not. Next, I’ll share with you my favorite thing in life—gratitude. Gratitude is the easiest way to transition a negative affect into a positive state of being. In chapter three I will discuss how language and perspective shape our experiences. Word choice and self-talk are extremely impactful in your relationship with yourself and your relationship with others. Chapter four is about complaining and how it serves us and inhibits us. There are many functions to complaining, like self-awareness and enhanced interpersonal relationships as well as consequences like being a draining friend to be around. Then I’ll share about the phenomenon of emotional contagion and compassion and finish it up with the final chapter about being present and practicing happiness in our daily lives. It is most important to live a life full of intentional daily actions. The tone of my book is conversational and meant to serve as an inspirational tool to aide in achieving a happier life.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

134192-Thumbnail Image.png

Female Collegiate Gymnast's Nutritional Knowledge and Health

Description

Forty collegiate gymnasts were recruited for a nutrition and health study. Participants must have been at least eighteen years old at Arizona State University (ASU) in the club or team gymnastics program. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) reviewed and accepted

Forty collegiate gymnasts were recruited for a nutrition and health study. Participants must have been at least eighteen years old at Arizona State University (ASU) in the club or team gymnastics program. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) reviewed and accepted my survey in order to hand out to the gymnasts. The ASU club and team coach and the ASU study team also approved my survey. As soon as the survey was approved, it was emailed to all of the gymnasts. ASU gymnasts were surveyed on nutritional knowledge and personal health. Subjects answered a quiz on nutrient needs and serving sizes. Personal questions consisted of height, weight, injuries, body image, and typical meal plans. Gymnasts were given a $10 compensation to increase the participation. We found that only 16% of gymnasts surveyed scored a 70% or higher on their nutritional knowledge. Although these gymnasts do not have adequate knowledge, the majority consume a healthy diet. Diets included fruits, vegetables, protein-rich foods, and few high fat and sugary foods. Four of the gymnasts had one or fewer injuries in the past two years, although, four gymnasts also had three or more injuries. No correlation was found between diet and injuries. There was also no correlation between the gymnast's nutritional knowledge and their health.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

134088-Thumbnail Image.png

The Commit to be Well Program: An Effective Worksite Wellness Program

Description

Health and wellness coaching has shown promising results in numerous studies. However, there is lack of published research evaluating the impact of using wellness-coaching interventions implemented by coaching trainees in a worksite setting. The main objective was to examine the

Health and wellness coaching has shown promising results in numerous studies. However, there is lack of published research evaluating the impact of using wellness-coaching interventions implemented by coaching trainees in a worksite setting. The main objective was to examine the changes in self-reported scores of the 12-wellness dimensions of health in ASU students, faculty, and staff after participating in an eight-week health and wellness program. The secondary outcome was to evaluate if additional health and wellness recommendations had a significant impact. The participants were aged 18 to 58 years and were divided into two groups: the first group received health and wellness coaching, while the second group received the health and wellness coaching in addition to recommendations on specific worksite social/embedded programs and supporting activities. Both groups had significantly increased scores in Eating/Nutrition and Thinking (p<0.001 and P<0.014 respectively). Health and wellness coaching trainees were effective in assisting clients on reaching realistic progress. Our program shows potential benefits in worksite wellness.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-12

136197-Thumbnail Image.png

Assisted Cycling Improves Cognitive and Motor Functioning in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

Description

This study examines cognitive and motor function in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) following an 8-week assisted cycling therapy intervention. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of an assisted cycling (AC) (i.e., exercise accomplished through the use

This study examines cognitive and motor function in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) following an 8-week assisted cycling therapy intervention. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of an assisted cycling (AC) (i.e., exercise accomplished through the use of a motor), a voluntary cycling (VC) (self-selected cadence), and a no cycling (NC) control group. Both ACT and VC groups rode a stationary bicycle for three 30-minute sessions a week, for a total of eight weeks. Participants completed cognitive testing that assessed information processing and manual dexterity at the beginning and at the end of the 8-week intervention. Consistent with our hypothesis, the results showed that information processing and manual dexterity improved following 8 weeks of cycling for the ACT group. These results were not seen for individuals in the voluntary and non-exercise groups. Our results suggest that assisted cycling therapy may induce permanent changes in the prefrontal cortex in adolescents with DS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

136229-Thumbnail Image.png

COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT FOR SHOW DETERMINING THE HEALTH STATUS AND RISK FACTORS OF PERSONS EXPERIENCING HOMELESS IN MARICOPA COUNTY

Description

Introduction/Purpose: This paper describes the process of the community needs assessment phase of program implementation for the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) clinic. Homeless individuals are more likely (than non homeless individuals) to experience serious illness, depression and mental

Introduction/Purpose: This paper describes the process of the community needs assessment phase of program implementation for the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) clinic. Homeless individuals are more likely (than non homeless individuals) to experience serious illness, depression and mental illness. Access to health care has been identified as a barrier to receiving appropriate health care to manage the diseases and conditions clients may have. SHOW's vision is to operate on Saturdays utilizing Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) to offer extended primary health care hours, along with offering health promotion programming to address the biopsychosocial components of their health. Ultimately, this aims to reduce the homeless population's need to visit emergency room departments for non- urgent, primary care visits. Methods: To validate the need for this clinic's operation of programming and health services, a community needs assessment was conducted to collect data about the population's current health status. Forty-three people (n=43) ages 20-76 (M = 44.87) were surveyed by a trained research team using interview questionnaires. Results: The results show a prevalence of self\u2014reported physical and behavioral conditions, and support that this population would benefit from extended hours of care. Mental and behavioral health conditions are the most prevalent conditions (with the highest rates of depression (41.86%) and anxiety disorder (32.56%)), followed by the common cold (23.36%) and back pain (16.28%). The average reported emergency department (ED) visits within the past six months was 1.18 times. Almost everyone surveyed would visit a free medical clinic on the Human Services Campus (HSC) staffed by health staff and health professional students on the weekends (93.18%). Conclusion: Overall, the community needs assessment conducted for SHOW supports the need for weekend access to health care facilities and an interest in health programming for this population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

135452-Thumbnail Image.png

Antiglycemic Properties of Mustard, a Condiment High in Vinegar

Description

According to the CDC, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. and rates are continuing to rise nationally and internationally. Chronically elevated blood glucose levels can lead to type 2 diabetes and other complications. Medications can

According to the CDC, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. and rates are continuing to rise nationally and internationally. Chronically elevated blood glucose levels can lead to type 2 diabetes and other complications. Medications can be used to treat diabetes, but often have side effects. Lifestyle and diet modifications can be just as effective as medications in helping to improve glycemic control, and prevent diabetes or improve the condition in those who have it. Studies have demonstrated that consuming vinegar with carbohydrates can positively impact postprandial glycemia in diabetic and healthy individuals. Continuous vinegar intake with meals may even reduce fasting blood glucose levels. Since vinegar is a primary ingredient in mustard, the purpose of this study was to determine if mustard consumption with a carbohydrate-rich meal (bagel and fruit juice) had an effect on the postprandial blood glucose levels of subjects. The results showed that mustard improved glycemia by 17% when subjects consumed the meal with mustard as opposed to the control. A wide variety of vinegars exists. The defining ingredient in all vinegars is acetic acid, behind the improvement in glycemic response observed with vinegar ingestion. Vinegar-containing foods range from mustard, to vinaigrette dressings, to pickled foods. The benefits of vinegar ingestion with carbohydrates are dose-dependent, meaning that adding even small amounts to meals can help. Making a conscious effort to incorporate these foods into meals, in addition to an overall healthy lifestyle, could provide an additional tool for diabetics and nondiabetics alike to consume carbohydrates in a healthier manner.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-05

134906-Thumbnail Image.png

Social Connectedness and Fast Food Consumption in College Freshmen

Description

Attending college provides young adults with a major shift in environment from high school where many students are used to living at home with their parents or guardians. Students experience a newfound freedom once beginning their freshman year, especially if

Attending college provides young adults with a major shift in environment from high school where many students are used to living at home with their parents or guardians. Students experience a newfound freedom once beginning their freshman year, especially if living in on-campus housing. Freshmen are known to gain weight during this transitory period, and this has been partially attributed to changes in eating behaviors, which makes this a population of concern. College freshmen have significant autonomy over their food choices if not living at home, due to not having parents or guardians present. In the transition to college, freshmen are able to adopt new habits, healthy or unhealthy, which could make a large impact on their health habits for the rest of their lives; this is why the freshman population is an area of concern. RESULTS: None of the relationships between social connectedness and FF consumption were found to be statistically significant. Social connectedness was not significantly related to cross-sectional FF intake at the two different phases, or longitudinally between the two phases, even after adjustments were made. Additionally, there were no gender differences present in FF consumption or social connectedness at either phase. CONCLUSION: The lack of significant findings suggest that social connectedness might not be a reason college freshmen consume FF. Students might eat with others due to the convenience of living closely to them rather than as a means to socialize. Also, factors such as time constraints and cost might have played a larger role in why students consumed FF. Future research could involve similar studies using shorter questionnaires more tailored to eating behaviors, with more detailed measures of FF consumption (e.g. What specific FF meals did you consume?) and for a longer duration of time, to allow students to become more situated in their environment and have a better knowledge of all their food options. This study was an important contribution to the sparsely researched topic of social connectedness with a large and diverse sample studied longitudinally. It was also the only study of its kind to be performed on the college population, and had potential for future health implications in obesity and chronic conditions such as hypertension and type II diabetes. Further research is warranted to evaluate the relationship between social connectedness and other eating behaviors.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

135714-Thumbnail Image.png

College Cooking Habits

Description

There are two goals for this honors student project: (1) to determine (using an online survey) what college students do and do not know about cooking and preparing foods and (2) to video record short demonstrations of several cooking skills

There are two goals for this honors student project: (1) to determine (using an online survey) what college students do and do not know about cooking and preparing foods and (2) to video record short demonstrations of several cooking skills that college students lack the most based on survey responses. Ultimately, this project hopes to help students develop skills they can use in the kitchen to encourage more cooking at home and less eating out, dietary changes that should lead to more healthful meals and a healthier population. Links to cooking videos: https://youtu.be/ufsVYnfoCQM https://youtu.be/aZCIH33ebZ0

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05