Matching Items (11)

hasta mañana

Description

Migration is natural, a human right, and to some extent, it is seen, allowed, and digested but by what bodies? Whose bodies? Who is given the privilege of range of

Migration is natural, a human right, and to some extent, it is seen, allowed, and digested but by what bodies? Whose bodies? Who is given the privilege of range of motion, and who is chained to a ground, underground, buried?
Through a questioning of migration, a mechanism of movement, and its criminalization from the states through the establishment of citizenry, I aim to declare autonomy, and seek a dissection of what it means to criminalize, to establish, render a community as other.

Hasta mañana is a prayer to my parents’ bodies,
to bodies crossing the border,
to bodies displaced,
to bodies that never made it,
to bodies dug up,
buried,
Chained,
Hurting,
Aging,
to bodies I feel and see.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Exploitation of Labor in Qatar: How Nepali Laborers are Victimized in Preparation for the 2022 FIFA Men’s World Cup

Description

This paper aims to effectively portray the stories of migrant laborers who have fallen victim to a system of powerful and exploitative institutions and governments that provide labor for the

This paper aims to effectively portray the stories of migrant laborers who have fallen victim to a system of powerful and exploitative institutions and governments that provide labor for the FIFA 2022 World Cup in Qatar. The purpose of this case study, therefore, is to both uncover the causes and magnitude of the crisis and to understand the relationship between the victimized laborers and the perpetrators. Through this study, I present the complex dynamics of a mass geopolitical operation that leads to the victimization of Nepali workers. I specifically outline why this issue is complicated and what the proper interventions may be to resolve it.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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EFFECT OF AGE OF ARRIVAL ON REFUGEE PERFORMANCE: EARLY ADOLESCENSE THROUGH EARLY ADULTHOOD

Description

Are there measurable differences between the human capital of the refugee children born inside and outside of the United States? If so, does the amount of time spent abroad before

Are there measurable differences between the human capital of the refugee children born inside and outside of the United States? If so, does the amount of time spent abroad before immigrating matter, and can we get an idea of what happens to this gap over time? Looking at the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS) 1991-2006, I examine standardized test scores and other indicators of performance of young Indochinese refugees and immigrants. This study finds evidence for a negative correlation between being born abroad and performance in selected metrics at the time of early adolescence. This is extended into a negative relationship between the lengths of time abroad before coming to the United States (age of arrival) and those same metrics. However, this study finds signs that this gap in human capital is at least partly bridged by the time of early adulthood. It remains unclear though, whether this possible catch up is reflected in other early adult outcomes such as household income.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Effects of a Widespread Union in NCAA Football

Description

With the National Labor Relations Board's decision to allow Northwestern University football players to unionize, the landscape of college athletics is changing very quickly. Due to their recognition as employees

With the National Labor Relations Board's decision to allow Northwestern University football players to unionize, the landscape of college athletics is changing very quickly. Due to their recognition as employees of the University, football players at Northwestern will receive many benefits that they would not have received before. They will be able to bargain for the things they want including: scholarships that cover the cost of attendance, increased medical coverage, measures to increase graduation rates, a safer game, and due process with the NCAA. However, this will come at a cost to the general welfare. Subsidies to athletic departments will continue to rise on college campuses due to the increasing costs of athletics and that cost will be incurred regressively on students. With an outcry from students, universities may be forced to stop the increase in subsidies, which may force some athletic departments to cut certain sports according to some parameters set by government legislation and the NCAA.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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21st Century Community Outreach and Collection Development: ASU Chicano/a Research Collection

Description

Mexicans and Mexican Americans have resided in Arizona since the early 16th century. Their history, however, is severely under-documented in the state’s archival repositories. As of 2012, this community is

Mexicans and Mexican Americans have resided in Arizona since the early 16th century. Their history, however, is severely under-documented in the state’s archival repositories. As of 2012, this community is represented in a mere 1-2% of the state’s known archival holdings, and 98% of such documentation is held at Arizona State University’s Chicano/a Research Collection (CRC). This article provides a historical review of the CRC’s establishment in 1970 and how its founding Curator, Dr. Christine Marín, transformed a small circulating book collection into Arizona’s largest repository for Mexican American history. It goes on to examine how the CRC’s sitting Archivist is using social media in tandem with a community-based workshop, bilingual promotional materials and finding aids, and description of unprocessed collections as community outreach and collection development tools in order to remedy the under-documentation of Mexican American history in Arizona. We argue that augmenting traditional archival field collecting methods with these strategies enables the CRC to build a more robust relationship with Arizona’s Mexican American community, allows us to continue expanding our archival holdings, and serves as an example for other repositories seeking to enhance their documentation of marginalized communities.

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Date Created
  • 2017-01-27

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Learning from Lochner: Critical Theory from the Corpse of the Lochner Zombie

Description

In modern legal and political debates, Lochner v. New York is regularly praised by libertarians for its rejection of economic regulation. To understand the libertarian impulse for revitalizing the Lochner

In modern legal and political debates, Lochner v. New York is regularly praised by libertarians for its rejection of economic regulation. To understand the libertarian impulse for revitalizing the Lochner decision, we must examine the foundations Lochner was decided on and the cases and laws that led to the end of the Lochner Era. The National Labor Relations Act of 1935 (Wagner Act) was passed as a counter-revolution to the anti-regulatory framework of the Lochner Era, and it found its legal accompaniment in the West Coast Hotel and NLRB v. Jones decisions. Some retrenchment followed: The Labor Management Relations Act of 1947 (Taft-Hartley Act) was passed to undercut the Wagner Act in ways that is possible to see as either a return to Lochnerism or as the rise of an executive supremacy argument in to the labor market. Writing during the negotiations of Taft-Hartley, Max Horkheimer, in Eclipse of Reason, explicitly rejects the economic premises that Taft-Harley rests upon and criticizes its logic of governance. We can learn from Horkheimer’s critique of the rationality behind the Taft-Hartley Act in order to understand the fundamental issues with the Lochner decision and modern libertarian attempts at confining governmental regulation to means that ensure the functioning of free-markets. This paper analyzes the economic rationality of the Wagner and Taft-Hartley Acts, arguing that the Wagner Act was a rejection of Locherian logic and that there is latent Lochnerian premises within the Taft-Hartley Act. This paper defines the Lochner zombie and seeks to understand the attractive power that the decision has on modern legal thought. Libertarian groups use the premises of the Lochner decision, civil rights and protection of contract as a means to render all, or almost all, governmental market regulation unconstitutional. I will be examining the cases of Lochner v. New York and West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish. In doing so, I will be utilizing the legal theories of Roberto Mangabeira Unger and the critical theory of Max Horkheimer as a framework for understanding the resurrection of the Lochner zombie. Part of the purpose of this paper is to establish a linkage between Horkheimer’s analysis of means-ends rationality and the reconstructive legal interpretation advocated by Unger. Using both Unger and Horkheimer together allows for a more robust critique of the ever more dominating libertarian legal theories. The Taft-Hartley Act and modern libertarian attacks on governmental regulation seek to replace the institutional and regulatory model of the Wagner Act with a theory of legal disciplinarity bound to economics and contract theory such that it would systematically exclude ethical and social justice forms of rationality from the canons of legal thinking. I counter this by proposing legal interdisciplinarity that utilizes critical theory and rationalizing legal analysis to promote democratization and governmental regulation. The only way to slay the Lochner zombie is to develop a reconstructive theory of law as a discipline situated relative to economics and other social sciences.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Contractor.io Managing Labor and Settlement in the 4th Industrial Revolution

Description

Through the lens of the physical and non-physical flows within the supply chain, this paper will analyze the societal implications of the transition to centralized factory operations following the Industrial

Through the lens of the physical and non-physical flows within the supply chain, this paper will analyze the societal implications of the transition to centralized factory operations following the Industrial revolution of the 18th century. The industrialized means of mass places heavy value on centralized operations as a means of establishing competitive advantages in economies of scale and standardized quality. With the emergence of new technologies such as additive manufacturing, artificial intelligence and blockchain, the direct labor required to produce goods and services greatly diminishes. The current trend towards the automation of physical production processes highlights a fundamental shift towards a service-based economy. This will serve as the foundation and introduction to assess the current production landscape and propose a theoretical model for labor and management “Contractor.io” to serve as a task management protocol for the contracting of labor as society transitions into an increasingly digital serviced based economy.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Alternative slaveries and American democracy: debt bondage and Indian captivity in the Civil War era Southwest

Description

This dissertation analyzes two regional systems of involuntary servitude (Indian captive slavery and Mexican debt peonage) over a period spanning roughly two centuries. Following a chronological framework, it examines the

This dissertation analyzes two regional systems of involuntary servitude (Indian captive slavery and Mexican debt peonage) over a period spanning roughly two centuries. Following a chronological framework, it examines the development of captive slavery in the Southwest beginning in the early 1700s and lasting through the mid-1800s, by which time debt peonage emerged as a secondary form of coerced servitude that augmented Indian slavery in order to meet increasing demand for labor. While both peonage and captive slavery had an indelible impact on cultural and social systems in the Southwest, this dissertation places those two labor systems within the context of North American slavery and sectional agitation during the antebellum period. The existence of debt bondage and Indian captivity in New Mexico had a significant impact on America's judicial and political institutions during the Reconstruction era.

Debt peonage and Indian slavery had a lasting influence on American politics during the period 1846 to 1867, forcing lawmakers to acknowledge the fact that slavery existed in many forms. Following the Civil War, legislators realized that the Thirteenth Amendment did not cast a wide enough net, because peonage and captive slavery were represented as voluntary in nature and remained commonplace throughout New Mexico. When Congress passed a measure in 1867 explicitly outlawing peonage and captive slavery in New Mexico, they implicitly acknowledged the shortcomings of the Thirteenth Amendment. The preexistence of peonage and Indian slavery in the Southwest inculcated a broader understanding of involuntary labor in post-Civil War America and helped to expand political and judicial philosophy regarding free labor. These two systems played a crucial role in America's transition from free to unfree labor in the mid-1800s and contributed to the judicial and political frameworks that undermined slavery.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Child labor in Iraq

Description

One in six children in the developing world is engaged in Child labor. Child labor is considered an issue that violates children's rights in many countries and Iraq is no

One in six children in the developing world is engaged in Child labor. Child labor is considered an issue that violates children's rights in many countries and Iraq is no exception. In 2004, Iraq had 1,300,000 children between the ages of eight and sixteen years engaged in work (UNICEF.com, 2004). This study identifies the major causes of child labor in Iraq and investigates the consequences of this issue. In this thesis I draw on the comparison of former regimes in Iraq and Egypt and how those regimes were mistreating their citizens by making them live under poverty and oppression while they were receiving support from the U.S. Poverty is the major cause behind Iraqi children engaging in work. I used the data I collected in Iraq, in the city of Nasiriyah, of 28 working children to explain the relationship between poverty, students drop out of school, family attitude towards education and the child engagement in work. At the end of the thesis I offer a list of recommendations to try to address the problem of child labor in Iraq. The recommendations and regulations are for Iraqi government and the NGOs to take into consideration in trying to resolve and regulate the issue of child labor to rescue the children in Iraq from more exploitation in the future.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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"By the Labors of Our Hands": An Analysis of Labor, Gender, and the Sisters of Charity in Kentucky and Ohio, 1812-1852

Description

This dissertation focuses on the development of two communities of women religious beginning in the early nineteenth century: the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, founded in 1812, and the Sisters

This dissertation focuses on the development of two communities of women religious beginning in the early nineteenth century: the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, founded in 1812, and the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, who arrived in Ohio in 1829 and became a diocesan community in 1852. Although administratively separate, these two apostolic communities shared a charism of service to the poor in the tradition of St. Vincent de Paul. The history of these two communities demonstrates the overlapping worlds women religious inhabited: their personal faith, their community life, their place in the Catholic Church, and their place in the regions where they lived. These women were often met with admiration as they formed necessary social institutions such as schools, hospitals, and orphanages that provided services to all religious denominations.

Sisters’ active engagement with their local communities defied anti-Catholic stereotypes at the time and created significant public roles for women. The skills needed to create and maintain successful social institutions demonstrate that these women were well-educated, largely self-sufficient, competent fundraisers, and well-liked by the Catholics and Protestants alike that they served. This dissertation argues for the importance of acknowledging and analyzing this tension: as celibate, educated women who used their skills for lifelong public service, the Sisters of Charity were clearly exceptional figures among nineteenth century women, though they did not challenge the gendered hierarchies of their church or American society.

To further understand this tension, this dissertation utilizes several cases studies of conflicts between sisters and their superiors in each community to examine the extent of their influence in deciding their community’s current priorities and planning for the future. These case studies demonstrate that obedience did not have a fixed definition but is better understood instead as dynamic and situational between multiple locations and circumstances. These findings concerning gender, labor, institution and community building, and the growth of American Catholicism highlight the integral role that women and religion played in the antebellum era.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019