Matching Items (9)

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Reproductive Health Equity: One Key Question© for Women in Recovery

Description

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population.

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population. Equity-informed approaches promote the integration of reproductive health care (RHC) with recovery programs to improve both access to and quality of RHC. Arizona’s largest SUD recovery program, Crossroads, Inc. recently opened an on-site, integrated primary clinic offering RHC. A one-month pilot demonstration of One Key Question (OKQ), a pregnancy desire screening tool, was implemented with fidelity at Crossroads to identify clients with RHC needs and offer care.

IRB exempt status was obtained through Arizona State University. All female-bodied clients aged 18-49 were screened following routine admission assessments. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim model based on Self-Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing was used to prioritize client autonomy. The client experience of care was measured using an adapted Interpersonal Quality of Family Planning scale. The magnitude of needs and desires were summarized with descriptive statistics. Sixty-three clients were screened with OKQ. Needs were identified in 97% of clients. Of those clients, 98% accepted referrals. Ninety percent of items measuring the client experience of care were rated as “excellent.” OKQ provided an efficient structure for person-centered screening and referral conversations to integrate RHC in a large SUD recovery program with excellent care experiences reported by clients.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-05

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Motivational Interviewing Impact on Cardiovascular Disease

Description

Harm reduction in cardiovascular disease is a significant problem worldwide. Providers, families, and healthcare agencies are feeling the burdens imparted by these diseases. Not to mention missed days of work

Harm reduction in cardiovascular disease is a significant problem worldwide. Providers, families, and healthcare agencies are feeling the burdens imparted by these diseases. Not to mention missed days of work and caregiver strain, the losses are insurmountable. Motivational interviewing (MI) is gaining momentum as a method of stimulating change through intrinsic motivation by resolving ambivalence toward change (Ma, Zhou, Zhou, & Huang, 2014).

If practitioners can find methods of educating the public in a culturally-appropriate and sensitive manner, and if they can work with community stakeholders to organize our resources to make them more accessible to the people, we may find that simple lifestyle changes can lead to risk reduction of cardiovascular diseases. By working with our community leaders and identifying barriers unique to each population, we can make positive impacts on a wide range of issues that markedly impact our healthcare systems.

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Date Created
  • 2020-04-28

SMART Hearts: Using Motivational Interviewing to Increase Cardiac Rehab Attendance

Description

One in every three deaths in the United States results from cardiovascular disease (CDC, 2013). Cardiovascular Rehabilitation (CR) is a medically supervised program designed to help improve cardiovascular health for

One in every three deaths in the United States results from cardiovascular disease (CDC, 2013). Cardiovascular Rehabilitation (CR) is a medically supervised program designed to help improve cardiovascular health for patients who have experienced heart attack, heart failure, angioplasty, or heart surgery (AHA, 2016). A hospital in the southwestern region of the United States of America reports their 2016 CR attendance rate of 79 %, which is much lower than the national average of 94% (AACVPR, 2016). Motivational interviewing (MI) is a proven method used to promote a positive behavior change for cardiac rehab patients. MI includes quality improvement activities such as peer support and cardiac rehab educational classes that have shown to increase health related quality of life measures and decreased depression symptoms (Pietrabessa et al., 2017; Pack et al., 2013).

Despite all the knowledge about CR and its benefits for health nationally, there are low attendance rates, therefore the purpose of this evidence-based project is to improve CR attendance rates using MI. Patients enrolled into CR participated in the motivational interviewing for eight classes. At the end of the class, they were given notecards to create Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic and Timely (SMART) Goals for themselves for that week. The measurement tools, the PHQ-9 and Dartmouth COOP is a simple, reliable, and valid tool for assessing functional status of cardiac patients and the current CR program utilizes this tool and is familiar with explaining this tool (Eaton, Young, Fergussion, Garrett, & Kolbe, 2005).

A Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated for the relationship between the MI classes and the CR attendance, depression scores, and quality of life. A strong positive correlation was found (r (82)= .456, p< .001) indicating a significant linear relationship between motivational interviewing and cardiac rehab attendance. A weak correlation that was not significant for depression symptoms and quality of life. The impact of this evidence-based project is to give cardiac rehab programs further evidence that the implementation of motivational interviewing can positively influence cardiac rehab attendance rates.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05-20

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Implementing an SBIRT Pilot Utilizing Student-mediated Screenings and Brief Interventions

Description

Background: Excessive alcohol use is linked to numerous morbidities, in addition to the enormous economic impact on healthcare. Screening, brief intervention, referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a proven, effective tool

Background: Excessive alcohol use is linked to numerous morbidities, in addition to the enormous economic impact on healthcare. Screening, brief intervention, referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a proven, effective tool in reducing alcohol use; however it is severely underutilized due to barriers such as provider time constraints and lack of confidence. Numerous missed opportunities exist regarding screening and early intervention, which could significantly improve patient outcomes. An SBIRT pilot utilizing student-mediated brief interventions could serve to increase provider confidence and awareness, as well as overcome time constraint barriers.

Purpose: The purpose is to implement an SBIRT pilot at a campus clinic, utilizing nurse practioner (NP) students to conduct universal alcohol screens and brief interventions (BI) as a means to overcome barriers to accepting an evidenced based practice.

Methods: Intervention group (IG) of two providers were matched with NP students to perform screens and BI’s (n=111), while a comparison group (CG) of three providers conducted usual care (n=41). Single question screens were administered universally, followed by an AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) and BI for positive screens. A pre/post pilot provider attitude survey was administered to gauge provider acceptance.

Results: Of 109 patients screened, 52% tested positive requiring a full AUDIT, 56% of AUDITS were positive requiring BI’s, 88% agreed to a BI, and 93% agreed to reduce alcohol intake. Post attitude survey revealed a 22% increase in provider acceptance. Chi square testing showed statistical significance, X²(1, N = 152) = 142.31, p < .001.

Conclusions: Utilizing students to perform universal screenings and BI’s is effective in implementing SBIRT while offering a sustainable option to overcome time constraint barriers and provider confidence as well as exposing misconceptions regarding patient acceptance.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-04-30

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Motivational Interviewing Education for Nurse Practitioners Providing Obesity Management

Description

Purpose: This project examined the effectiveness of an online educational module on basic Motivational Interviewing (MI) techniques for Nurse Practitioners (NPs) providing obesity management to middle-aged women.

Background: Middle-aged women experience

Purpose: This project examined the effectiveness of an online educational module on basic Motivational Interviewing (MI) techniques for Nurse Practitioners (NPs) providing obesity management to middle-aged women.

Background: Middle-aged women experience distinct physiological and psychosocial factors that contribute to weight gain and make obesity management especially challenging. The evidence supports the use of motivational interviewing (MI) interventions as a highly effective approach to obesity management in combination with standard medical weight loss programs. Educating NPs that provide medical weight loss on basic MI counseling techniques is necessary to facilitate the use of this intervention.

Methods: NP providers at a group of seven medical weight loss clinics in the southwestern United States completed an online MI educational module that was developed for this project. The module content covered basic MI counseling techniques. MI knowledge was assessed using a 6-item pre/post-test. Participants completed an 8-item course evaluation to provide additional feedback.

Results: Ten of the 13 NPs eligible participated in the project. The overall response to the project was positive as demonstrated by high scores on the course evaluation. The average post-test knowledge scores increased after completion of the module, however no statistical significance was noted.

Conclusions: The basic MI education module was beneficial for NPs providing obesity management and future research should focus on developing standardized MI weight loss interventions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-02

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Health Care Provider Use of Motivational Interviewing to Address Vaccine Hesitancy in College Students

Description

Background: Vaccine-preventable diseases significantly influence the health and academic success of college students. Despite the known negative impact of these diseases, vaccination rates routinely fall short of national goals and

Background: Vaccine-preventable diseases significantly influence the health and academic success of college students. Despite the known negative impact of these diseases, vaccination rates routinely fall short of national goals and recommendations. Although vaccination decisions are complex, a recommendation from a health care provider is one of the key motivators for individuals receiving a vaccine. Motivational interviewing (MI), a counseling approach primarily used to address substance abuse, can be applied to other health-related behaviors.

Local Problem: Despite previous quality improvement efforts aimed at increasing vaccine rates for influenza, human papillomavirus (HPV), and meningitis B (MenB), vaccinations at large university health centers have been well below benchmarks set by Healthy People 2020.

Methods: This study was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior and included MI training and regular reinforcement for health care providers to address vaccine hesitancy with college students.

Results: Influenza vaccination rates improved, but HPV vaccine rates remained stable and MenB vaccine rates decreased compared with the previous year. Clinicians demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge of MI techniques after a targeted educational intervention. Repeat measures indicate the potential for sustained improvement when ongoing reinforcement is provided.

Conclusion: MI can be an effective part of a strategy to increase vaccination rates.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-26

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Implementing a sustainable program evaluation component at a large university counseling center

Description

This action research dissertation study was undertaken to establish the foundation of a comprehensive evaluation component for the Turn-It-Around (TIA) workshop intervention program at Arizona State University (ASU), and was

This action research dissertation study was undertaken to establish the foundation of a comprehensive evaluation component for the Turn-It-Around (TIA) workshop intervention program at Arizona State University (ASU), and was delivered in the form of a program development consultation. The study's intent was to enhance the ASU Counseling Service's departmental capacity to evaluate one of its important clinical services. The outcomes of this study included multiple assessments of TIA's evaluability and the fidelity of its implementation to its program design. The study products include a well-articulated program theory comprised of program goals, learning objectives, a detailed description of program activities, a logic model, and theoretical construct checklist documents articulating the behavioral science theory underlying the TIA intervention. In addition, instruments tailored to the Turn-It-Around intervention that are suitable for assessing program outcomes were developed and are implementation ready. TIA's clinical stakeholders were interviewed following the generation and delivery of the products and instruments mentioned above to determine whether they found the study's processes and products to be worthwhile and useful. In general, the clinicians reported that they were very satisfied with the benefits and outcomes of the program development consultation. As an action research dissertation, this study generated useful and usable collateral materials in the form of reports, documents, and models. These products are now at the disposal of TIA's institutional stakeholders for use in day-to-day business activities such as training new facilitators and liaisons, and giving presentations that describe the usefulness of TIA as an intervention. Beyond the documents generated to form a program evaluation infrastructure for Turn-It-Around, the processes involved in crafting the documents served to engage relevant stakeholders in a cycle of action research that enriched and solidified their understandings of TIA and furnished them with insight into their counterparts' thinking about the intervention and its potential to benefit the college students they are responsible for helping. Consistent with the intent of action research, the processes involved in accomplishing the objectives of this study surfaced new topics and questions that will be useful in subsequent cycles of program improvement.  

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Can-Do-Tude: an online intervention using principles of motivational interviewing and tailored diabetes self-management education for adolescents with Type 1 diabetes

Description

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most common chronic diseases in youth and it has been shown that adolescents have the worst glycemic control of any age group.

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most common chronic diseases in youth and it has been shown that adolescents have the worst glycemic control of any age group. The objective of this study was to develop, test and evaluate the feasibility of an online intervention (Can-Do-Tude) that uses the principles of motivational interviewing (MI) to deliver tailored diabetes self-management education to adolescents with T1D. Bandura’s efficacy belief system was used to guide the design of this study.

The study used a multi-phase, multi-method approach. The first phase (alpha) of this study was a qualitative descriptive design to examine the intervention’s fidelity. Evaluation of performance was conducted by experts in the fields of MI, T1D, adolescence and/or online education. The second phase (beta) was a quantitative descriptive design conducted in order to evaluate feasibility by examining the acceptability (recruitment, retention and satisfaction) and implementation (diabetes self-management self-efficacy) to determine whether the intervention was appropriate for further testing.

First phase findings showed that the intervention passed all measures with the content experts (n = 6): it was functional, accurate, usable and secure. Improvements to the intervention were made based on reviewer recommendations. For the second phase 5 adolescents between 14 and 17 were enrolled. Three adolescents completed all 4 weeks of the intervention while 2 completed only 3 weeks. Participants (n = 3) rated satisfaction on a 5-point Likert-type scale ranging from “not at all” satisfied (1) to “very much” satisfied (5). There was a positive response to the intervention (M = 4.28, SD = 0.55). Implementation was measured by a pre- and post-test for diabetes self-management self-efficacy. Participants (n = 3) demonstrated overall improvements in diabetes self-management self-efficacy (Z = -2.952, p = .007).

Implications for further Can-Do-Tude research are planned at a metropolitan diabetes center using updated technology including an application platform. Although the sample was small, findings indicate that the intervention can be conducted using a web-based format and there is initial evidence of improvement in self-efficacy for diabetes self-management.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Correctional officer punitiveness, self-control, and rehabilitative training

Description

Correctional officers are increasingly being trained in evidence-based practices and the willingness of officers to implement what they have learned is crucial for organizational reform. Most of the literature

Correctional officers are increasingly being trained in evidence-based practices and the willingness of officers to implement what they have learned is crucial for organizational reform. Most of the literature in this area has examined officer attitudes about rehabilitation and punitiveness. Left out are additional characteristics, such as self-control, that may affect an officer’s receptivity to learn and implement new techniques. The present study examines officer receptiveness to motivational interviewing using 280 surveys administered to correctional officers tasked with both delivering and supervising program delivery to inmates within the Arizona Department of Corrections. Three broad questions are asked: 1) Are officer attitudes about punishment associated with receptivity toward implementing rehabilitative techniques? 2) Are officer levels of self-control associated with receptivity toward implementing rehabilitative techniques? and 3) Is the association between officer attitudes toward punishment and receptivity toward implementing rehabilitation techniques moderated by officer self-control? The results suggest that punitiveness and self-control both have statistically significant direct effects on correctional officer receptivity to training and that self-control does not moderate the relationship between punitiveness and receptivity to training. However, these findings could be due to limitations in the present study’s sampling and statistical methods. Policy implications and future research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018