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Arizona Nurses Association Member Involvement in Public Policy

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The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits. A 20- item survey was sent to all of the members of AzNA. There were 39 responses used in the analysis. The highest reported public policy activities in which the nurses had participated were: voted (90%), contacted a public official (51%), and gave money to a campaign or for a public policy concern (46%). Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to involvement and improving the health of the public was the most frequently reported benefit to involvement. The number of public policy education/information sources and the highest level of education positively correlate to the nurses' total number of public policy activities (r = .627 p <0.05; r = .504, p <0.05). Based on the results of stepwise linear regression analysis, the participants' age, number of education/information sources, and efficacy expectation predict 68.8% of involvement in public policy activities. The greater the number of education/information sources, the greater the number of public policy activities nurses report having participated in.

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2015-12

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A Gap Analysis of Syphilis Screening During Pregnancy by Prenatal Care Clinicians

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Congenital syphilis (CS) is increasing at an alarming rate in Arizona. The state health department has recommended increased screening to include the third trimester, but providers in individual counties are not following the recommendation. A literature search and appraisal showed

Congenital syphilis (CS) is increasing at an alarming rate in Arizona. The state health department has recommended increased screening to include the third trimester, but providers in individual counties are not following the recommendation. A literature search and appraisal showed increased screening reduces the incidence of CS and presented interventions to increase screening rates. Furthermore, the literature suggests provider education increases screening rates. However, before education could be completed an understanding of providers current knowledge, attitudes, and practice was needed. Using this information, a gap analysis that was completed in an Arizona county (“the County”) of syphilis screening during pregnancy by prenatal care clinicians will be presented guided by the Knowledge-Attitude-Practice (KAP) Model and the ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation.

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2020-04-24