Matching Items (27)

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Transforming Public Space Toolkit

Description

The purpose of this public space toolkit is to provide the knowledge people need to transform public spaces within their community. Public spaces are a major part of cities that

The purpose of this public space toolkit is to provide the knowledge people need to transform public spaces within their community. Public spaces are a major part of cities that people use everyday. The problem is that many open public spaces, like vacant lots, are not effectively used. Meanwhile, communities face issues including social isolation, food scarcity, etc. Therefore, transforming public spaces using community gardens will help address these matters. Methods used for this toolkit include using research databases, examining scholarly journals, and using primary experiences to navigate topics. Results show that there are numerous social benefits obtained when public space management strategies and best practices are properly implemented. This toolkit outlines the strategies and guidelines to consider when starting a garden and what has been proven to be effective for other gardens.
These gardens facilitate community development, build social capital, and address food insecurity. Local Phoenix community gardens, Phoenix Renews and The TigerMountain Foundation, are analyzed. The TigerMountain Foundation was able to demonstrate the power of Asset Based Community Development and how community gardens provided a way for people to invest in their community and gain skills. The Phoenix Renews garden showed the importance of selecting the right space for a garden, and the downsides when certain considerations are not made. Conclusively, community garden can be a catalyst for people to transform their communities. This tool kit provides a starting point, with the knowledge and background information, for people to improve their communities through transforming public space using community gardens.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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My Academic Community Engaged Learning Design: Promoting Equitable Civic Engagement

Description

College students are motivated, passionate, and knowledgeable individuals who lack opportunities and the appropriate first-hand experience to get involved in their local community. I used an Academic Community Engaged Learning

College students are motivated, passionate, and knowledgeable individuals who lack opportunities and the appropriate first-hand experience to get involved in their local community. I used an Academic Community Engaged Learning (ACEL) approach to build student self- efficacy to engage with their community. I created a formal curriculum that teaches students the basics of community development and encourages students to consider their role and impact in the community. I organized a community project with a local elementary school to create a kindness mural that would give students an opportunity to experience community engagement, thereby facilitating deeper comprehension of the material. I find that ACEL can be a valuable tool in harnessing college students by using their motivation and passion to facilitate a collaborative process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Youth Engagement in the Town of Guadalupe

Description

The town of Guadalupe, Arizona has a long history of divided residents and high poverty rates. The high levels of poverty in the town can be attributed to numerous factors,

The town of Guadalupe, Arizona has a long history of divided residents and high poverty rates. The high levels of poverty in the town can be attributed to numerous factors, most notably high rates of drug abuse, low high school graduation rates, and teen pregnancy. The town has named one of its most pressing issues of today to be youth disengagement. There are currently a handful of residents and community members passionate about finding a solution to this issue. After working with Guadalupe's Ending Hunger Task Force and resident youth, I set out to create a program design for a Guadalupe Youth Council. This council will contribute to combating youth disengagement. The program design will assist the task force in creating a standing youth council and deciding on the structure and role the council has in the town. I will offer learning outcomes and suggestions to the Task Force, youth council staff, and the youth of the youth council. This study contains an analysis of relevant literature, youth focus group results and data, and how the information gathered has contributed to the design of the youth council. The results of this study contain recommendations about four themes within the program design of a youth council: size, recruitment, activities and engagement, and adult support. The results also explore how the youth council will impact the power, policy, and behavior of Guadalupe youth.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Community Development, Sustainability, and Food Access; A Case Study of Community Gardens in Phoenix, Arizona

Description

This honors thesis examines community gardens from throughout Phoenix, Arizona. It shows that community gardens have the potential to both support and hinder sustainability efforts, encourage community development, and increase

This honors thesis examines community gardens from throughout Phoenix, Arizona. It shows that community gardens have the potential to both support and hinder sustainability efforts, encourage community development, and increase food access. By measuring the temperature at various community gardens throughout Phoenix, AZ, community gardens were shown to minimize local effects of the urban heat island. Because they use water to survive and Phoenix, AZ is in a desert, this contributes to a depleting water supply. Interviews of gardeners from community gardens throughout Phoenix depicted that community gardens can provide sites for community development as well as promoting food access.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Living in Place: Using Public Participation to Foster Meaningful Connections

Description

Public participation is lauded as a keystone of sustainability policy and community development. Sustainability issues span all sectors of society and are best addressed at the local level, which makes

Public participation is lauded as a keystone of sustainability policy and community development. Sustainability issues span all sectors of society and are best addressed at the local level, which makes community involvement and participation necessary for building local sustainability strategies. But do public participation events actually foster meaningful connections among those who attend? How can we as sustainability experts empower communities to share their knowledge about the place where they live? This project starts by considering at gaps in public participation processes that prevent members of a community from building a sense of trust. Major gaps identified in the public participation process include a lack of attention to underlying power dynamics, unaddressed social tensions, and a lack of focus on the co-creation of knowledge. These gaps lead to a lack of trust between facilitators and participants, and prevents participants from feeling invested in the process and forming meaningful connections with their fellow participants. Based on the gaps identified in public participation processes, the second part of this project focused on hosting a workshop that would bring people together in an effort to rebuild trust. The workshop centered around the meaning of community and sense of place, as these topics are relevant to the health and relationships of communities. The event was hosted on Arizona State University's Tempe campus, and the participants were all connected to the university in some way (student, faculty, or alumni). A pre-workshop survey was sent out to participants to gauge favorite places on campus and what made those places meaningful. The workshop itself was broken into two parts: Part One focused on the building a trusting space for the workshop and unpacking the definition of community in a group discussion. Part Two included two mapping exercises that engaged participants in how the land around ASU's Tempe campus had changed over time, followed by a discussion about how the history of land affects communities. A post-workshop survey was sent out two weeks after the event to see how participants had incorporated lessons from the workshop, if at all. The workshop process brought up several interesting areas for further research. One outcome of the discussion in Part One of the workshop was that the participants tended to think of community in terms of relationships rather than place. People also interacted differently based on how confident they were in their knowledge of the topic at hand, whether expert or informal. Public participation workshops like this have implications for how governments, businesses and schools approach stakeholder engagement. With the right balance of power and co-creation of knowledge, public participation events can become places for members of a community to rebuild trust in each other and the institutions that govern them.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Design & Community Development: The Built Environment's Role in the Health of Native American Communities

Description

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies.

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies. I believe that the design of a community's buildings can greatly affect the health of the community. This thesis focuses on the social aspects of design. How might we enhance the social capital of Native communities through the built environment?

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Music & Sustainability: Partners for a Brighter Future

Description

In light of the intensifying environmental, social, and economic challenges facing the world, sustainable development is more necessary than ever. Approaching sustainability problems through Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) programs involving

In light of the intensifying environmental, social, and economic challenges facing the world, sustainable development is more necessary than ever. Approaching sustainability problems through Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) programs involving music is unconventional, but holds potential for grand results. An examination of various existing community development projects, from the Playing for Change Foundation to the Arizona State University Barrett Choir, shows that music-related activities are highly effective at fostering community development. Once a foundation of community connectedness is created, other issues such as social injustices or natural disasters can be more effectively addressed and overcome. Music and other fine arts can contribute, in a variety of ways, to the health of communities. This should be recognized and utilized in the pursuit of sustainable community development to preserve the health of the planet and its inhabitants.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Your Faith and Your Health: A Community Based Resource to Promote Mental Health Awareness

Description

An educational toolkit was developed and created to normalize the dialogue of mental health at the community level. The intended audience for the toolkit is the faith community. Clergy, ministers,

An educational toolkit was developed and created to normalize the dialogue of mental health at the community level. The intended audience for the toolkit is the faith community. Clergy, ministers, and other prominent leaders play integral roles in shaping the worldviews of parishioners, and thus have the capacity to promote mental health awareness in the communities they serve.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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From soul searching to community building: Understanding community identification through community "jen-tung" process

Description

This study provides insights into expanding the concepts of community arts in general and more specifically community-based art practices (CAP); highlights the participatory characteristics in the processes of CAP, and

This study provides insights into expanding the concepts of community arts in general and more specifically community-based art practices (CAP); highlights the participatory characteristics in the processes of CAP, and seeks to discern the mechanism that contributes to the formation of community collective identity. Revolving around Bhattacharyya’s (1995, 2004) conceptualization of community development, this study found it essential for exploring the fundamental concept of community in relation to community identity. To examine the concept of community identity, this research anchors the inquiry by studying how community-based art practice contributes to community identification and seeks to discover the connection between identity process and social change. The research also discusses the emergent concepts that serve as influential factors to the formation of community identity and proposes an alternative identification mechanism, ‘jen-tung’ process, which provides a needed new dimension to the existing theories of social identity formation and community efficacy development.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Bolstering youth community involvement: uncovering the essential role of family and leadership

Description

This dissertation explores youth community involvement in a geographically defined urban community in the United States. The research approach was qualitative, naturalistic, and ethnographic, and utilized grounded theory analysis. The

This dissertation explores youth community involvement in a geographically defined urban community in the United States. The research approach was qualitative, naturalistic, and ethnographic, and utilized grounded theory analysis. The study included fifty-six participants. In focus groups and interviews with youth and adults as well as with a group of youth and adults working on events in the community (hereby called the “Active Youth Group” or AYG), the characteristics of the community were discussed. Furthermore, the study inquired about the nature of youth adult-interactions. In this context, the categories “family” and “leadership” emerged. The study highlights the importance of family in the lives of residents of the community. Furthermore, the study contributes to the literature about youth adult-partnerships (Camino, 2000; Camino & Zeldin, 2002a; Jones, 2004; Lofquist, 1989) by exploring the dynamics between youth-led and adult-led community work. It discusses some of the factors that may influence whether the youth or the adults are in charge of various components of a youth development program.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016