Matching Items (253)

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Obesity in Adults on Antidepressant Therapy

Description

In the United States obesity continues to be a growing issue in the adult population, which is compounded by the fact that many people have had antidepressant therapy at some

In the United States obesity continues to be a growing issue in the adult population, which is compounded by the fact that many people have had antidepressant therapy at some point in their lives. Health problems such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, skeleton/joint issues and more can stem from obesity. These comorbid health care problems can increase the costs at the state and federal levels. This paper will examine obesity and its relation to antidepressant therapy in depressed adults that are obese or endeavoring to avoid further weight gain. Research indicates that antidepressant therapies have shown a greater propensity towards weight gain, though few research studies show weight loss.

Intervention: 10 minutes of nutritional counseling during office visits. Setting: Family psychiatric clinic in the southwest of the United States.

Methods: Data collection process: Depressed adults on antidepressant therapies were randomly selected.

Instrumentation: Weight scale, National Literacy Scale, pamphlet (for teaching) and height scale. Data collected was at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks.

Outcomes: 14 Participants agreed to the project, 10 completed to the 4-week mark and 4 finished the project to the 8-week mark. 10 female participants and 4 male participants. The remaining 4 participants showed 1.6% reduction in body mass index, which correlated with an increase in nutritional learning from baseline to 8-weeks.

Recommendations: Nutritional counseling is a non-pharmacological intervention for achieving and a desired weight, which has shown positive results in varying populations and clinical situations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-07

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Sustainability Practices of University Food Pantries in the US

Description

The objective of this study was to evaluate sustainability knowledge and practices in place at university-associated food pantries across the United States. A survey was sent to university- associated food

The objective of this study was to evaluate sustainability knowledge and practices in place at university-associated food pantries across the United States. A survey was sent to university- associated food pantries and responses were collected at a rate of 25% (n=84 of 326) to assess the knowledge and practices of this topic. The pantries surveyed were chosen solely based on ability to contact through email (emails were retrieved from online sources) and about 50% of the 680 university-associated pantries in the United States were sent the survey. The data was analyzed by quantifying the qualitative responses to the 9 sustainability- rated questions addressing zero- waste practice, barriers to offering sustainably sourced foods, types of sustainable donations, desire for sustainable products, and client demand for sustainable products and practices were posed to pantries. Results from this study provided insight into awareness of sustainability in these pantries and also assessed what sustainability practices are already being practiced by these pantries. Among those surveyed, a low percentage of university-associated pantries actually provide sustainably sourced foods (9.5%), but given the choice about a third (38.1%) would choose to offer these foods. It was reported that availability and cost were perceived as main barriers to providing sustainably sourced foods and that a small proportion of pantries teach their clients about zero waste practices, compost, and recycling. There is little client concern about this issue. Most pantries reported recycling more often than composting and also reported participating in some zero-waste practices. These results are unique to this study as not much research has been done in this area to assess environmental sustainability awareness in university-associated food pantries. Further research is required to further evaluate pantries across the nation as this sample size is approximately 12% of all university- associated pantries in the United States.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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The Effects of Time Restricted Feeding on Mood

Description

Intermittent Fasting (IF) is defined as a cyclical eating pattern where an individual will fast for a specific increment of time, followed by caloric intake periods. Fasting is a crucial

Intermittent Fasting (IF) is defined as a cyclical eating pattern where an individual will fast for a specific increment of time, followed by caloric intake periods. Fasting is a crucial part of our ancestors’ adaptation to the stresses of famine in order to maintain mental acuity and physical abilities during food deprivation. IF influences physiological changes such as: triggers protective metabolic pathways, increases metabolic flexibility and resilience, promotes DNA repair and autophagy, increases microbiome diversity and restores the natural cyclical fluctuations of the gut, increases BDNF expression in mood regulating neuronal circuits, and enhances synaptic plasticity of the brain. Research on the underlying causes of mood disorders has linked impairments in neuroplasticity and cellular resilience to this pathophysiology, which fasting could mitigate. Depression and anxiety are reported as the top impediments to academic performance. Thus, an easily implemented treatment such as intermittent fasting may be an option for combating impaired mental health in college students. This research study tested time restricted feeding (TRF) and its impact on mood states. It was hypothesized that: if college students follow a time restricted feeding pattern, then they will be less moody due to TRF’s effects on the metabolism, brain, and gut. The study consisted of 11 college students: 5 following a four-week adherence to TRF (8am-4pm eating window) and 6 in the control group. The POMS questionnaire was used to measure mood states. The participants height, weight, BMI, body fat %, and POMS scores were tested at the beginning and end of the 4 week intervention. The results were as follows: weight p=0.112 (statistical trend), BMI p=0.058 (nearly significant), body fat % p=0.114 (statistical trend), POMS p=0.014 (statistically significant). The data suggests that following a TRF eating pattern can decrease moodiness and improve mood states.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Development of an Educational Video Game

Description

The objective of this creative project was to gain experience in digital modeling, animation, coding, shader development and implementation, model integration techniques, and application of gaming principles and design through

The objective of this creative project was to gain experience in digital modeling, animation, coding, shader development and implementation, model integration techniques, and application of gaming principles and design through developing a professional educational game. The team collaborated with Glendale Community College (GCC) to produce an interactive product intended to supplement educational instructions regarding nutrition. The educational game developed, "Nutribots" features the player acting as a nutrition based nanobot sent to the small intestine to help the body. Throughout the game the player will be asked nutrition based questions to test their knowledge of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. If the player is unable to answer the question, they must use game mechanics to progress and receive the information as a reward. The level is completed as soon as the question is answered correctly. If the player answers the questions incorrectly twenty times within the entirety of the game, the team loses faith in the player, and the player must reset from title screen. This is to limit guessing and to make sure the player retains the information through repetition once it is demonstrated that they do not know the answers. The team was split into two different groups for the development of this game. The first part of the team developed models, animations, and textures using Autodesk Maya 2016 and Marvelous Designer. The second part of the team developed code and shaders, and implemented products from the first team using Unity and Visual Studio. Once a prototype of the game was developed, it was show-cased amongst peers to gain feedback. Upon receiving feedback, the team implemented the desired changes accordingly. Development for this project began on November 2015 and ended on April 2017. Special thanks to Laura Avila Department Chair and Jennifer Nolz from Glendale Community College Technology and Consumer Sciences, Food and Nutrition Department.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

Nutrition Education Video Series for the Improvement of Arizona State University Student Health

Description

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which information is true and which advice they will follow. During this time of growth and learning, it is essential that students have access to accurate information that will help them to be healthier individuals for years to come. The goal of this project was to provide students with an easily accessible and reliable resource for nutrition information that was presented in a simple and relatable way. The following videos and attached materials were created in response to ASU student needs and will be available for students on the ASU wellness website. Eating Healthy on a Budget: https://youtu.be/H-IUArD0phY Healthy Choices at Fast Food Restaurants: https://youtu.be/ZxcjBblpRtM Quick Healthy Meals: https://youtu.be/7uIDFe15-dM

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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ASU Eats: Utilizing Meal Plans to Feed Arizona State's Food Insecure

Description

The broke, hungry college student living off packaged noodles and cans of beans—it is the stereotype known across the country, and unfortunately for students it is all too accurate. According

The broke, hungry college student living off packaged noodles and cans of beans—it is the stereotype known across the country, and unfortunately for students it is all too accurate. According to current research, nearly half of all college students across America are considered food insecure, meaning they have trouble acquiring healthy and filling food at some point during the year. Furthermore, problems with food access are often connected to other common issues students face including accessing affordable housing and employment opportunities. Food insecure students face educational consequences as well, including the inability to supply required course materials and even leaving their studies. Simultaneously, at Arizona State students lose thousands of dollars per year in unused meal plan funds, either in the form of meal swipes or Maroon & Gold dollars, and there is interest among students to utilize the funds to support their peers. This thesis explores existing organizations attempting to address student food insecurity both on campus and across the country, analyzing their limitations and benefits. It then proposes a new program, ASU Eats, which would allow students with excess meal plan funds to donate them to their food insecure peers through the creation of a central fund bank. It also discusses potential concerns from the University’s administration and the student body along with the structure this program would need to serve ASU’s continually growing campuses. This thesis concludes by stressing the importance of long-term food security, which ASU Eats would strive to achieve for all students who use the program.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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A Review of the Current Understanding on Immune Cell Sensitivity to Variation in Energy Availability

Description

This study takes a broad look into the existing research on the relationship between two physiological topics, nutrition and immunity in vertebrates, specifically the mammalian and avian branches. This was

This study takes a broad look into the existing research on the relationship between two physiological topics, nutrition and immunity in vertebrates, specifically the mammalian and avian branches. This was achieved by critiquing available studies on different types of immune cells, and how variable energy availability, as well as specific pathogens, impact cell function. Notably, most studies examined individuals with compromised immune systems, which reveals an existing knowledge gap in the linkages between nutrition and immunity in healthy organisms. Links between immunity and nutrition were identified across the studies, with the three main energy molecules, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, implicated in functional roles as immune modulators. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects occur dependent on elevated and depleted nutrient levels, and multiple cell types are sensitive to changes in nutrient availability. Further studies should be conducted on healthy individuals of model species, as well as wildlife and other non-model species to identify and describe the effects of host nutritional status on the spread of pathogens and the implications at the population level for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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How do perceptions of nutrition influence student nutritional health behavior and nutritional health seeking behavior?

Description

The transition from high school to college is, for many, a drastic change in lifestyle, social networks, and dietary choices. The prevalence of obesity in college students has been steadily

The transition from high school to college is, for many, a drastic change in lifestyle, social networks, and dietary choices. The prevalence of obesity in college students has been steadily increasing. Freshmen weight gains have been associated with a decrease in fruits and vegetables and an increase in unhealthy items such as desserts, alcohol, and late night snacking after dinner. A survey of college students was constructed to gauge students' perceptions of nutrition how these perceptions influenced dietary practices and behaviors. Survey results indicated that awareness of nutrition and health does not translate to dietary practices, aligning with results from previous studies. Several sex differences were noted in regards to dietary choices and perceptions, knowledge seeking behavior, and sources of information. While there were some similarities, it is clear from the results obtained that men and women have different approaches and thoughts with regard to nutrition. The results showed that college students who actively seek our nutritional information are more likely to do so in the form of social media or Internet sources. This study could be useful for those planning on conducting college-based nutritional programs in that the results indicate patterns and trends that should be taken into consideration in order for a successful nutrition intervention

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Injury Prevention of Young Adult Competitive Athletes

Description

Injury Prevention of Young Adult Competitive Athletes Abstract: This literature review covers many aspects of health and injury prevention that affects the young adult population. This review will begin to

Injury Prevention of Young Adult Competitive Athletes Abstract: This literature review covers many aspects of health and injury prevention that affects the young adult population. This review will begin to formulate a general guideline for sustaining performance while minimizing the incidence for injury. This population is specifically narrowed down to competitive athletes between the ages of 16-22. Some of the topics covered in this paper are the effects of macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients such as iron, calcium, vitamin D and vitamin C, on the body. Along with relating nutrition to lowering the risk of injury, there are also other topics covered such as sleep, stress relief in the form of binaural sounds, training and over-training. Nutrition topics include carbohydrates, proteins and fats, which are then split into their respective roles inside the body. These macro-nutrients are also associated with recovery and the timing and quantity consumed can be at optimal levels for competitive athletes based on gender, age and size. The vitamins and minerals discussed are also important factors in injury prevention related to bone, ligament and muscle strength. These micro-nutrients are also related to hormone regulation and immune system response which are necessary in mitigating the risk of injury in the population being analyzed. Finally, there is a training section of this literary review which covers monitoring external and internal loads experienced by the athletes, movement patterns as well as flexibility, and how to respond to over-training syndrome and overreaching in young adult athletes. Creating a balance between all aspects covered will result in a high likelihood of reducing the risk for injury in the young adult population.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12