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Arizona's Potential in Filmmaking: Why Arizona can, and should be a player in the movie industry

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The Film Industry is one of most exciting and informative businesses in the world, a business where the revenue of a single feature film can approach or exceed $1 billion. Current trends show a significant increase in independent production and

The Film Industry is one of most exciting and informative businesses in the world, a business where the revenue of a single feature film can approach or exceed $1 billion. Current trends show a significant increase in independent production and a demand for major studio facilities outside of California. Many states are meeting the demand by building state-of-the-art sound stages and production facilities. To further attract productions into their state, tax incentives and rebates are offered, resulting in a long-term influx of movie production that generates hundreds of millions of dollars of revenue for their communities, contributing an estimated $200,000 a day into the coffers of the localities where they film. In addition to the revenue it generates, the motion picture and television industries employ over 1.3 million Americans. Despite numerous benefits to states that cater to the movie industry, Arizona continues to flounder. With all the resources and advantages offered to Arizona including good weather and proximity to Hollywood, the state has the potential to become a key player within the film industry. The purpose of this study is to conduct interviews from industry professionals, both in and out of state, to get an idea of where Arizona stands in the movie making industry and if the state should take the steps necessary to build a more dominant presence. Using states like New Mexico as a model, comparisons will be made between different programs offered and implemented in both Arizona and other states. Data will be collected through induction of personal interviews and the responses gathered will be used to formulate a more formidable opinion on what Arizona is capable of doing within the movie making industry.

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Created

Date Created
2019-12

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A Marketing Guide for Newly Established Nonprofits

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This section acts as a guide for newly established nonprofits in creating a marketing plan. Through extensive research on what strategic marketing looks like in the nonprofit sector, we have developed a guide for nonprofits that are attempting to establish

This section acts as a guide for newly established nonprofits in creating a marketing plan. Through extensive research on what strategic marketing looks like in the nonprofit sector, we have developed a guide for nonprofits that are attempting to establish their brand and expand their marketing techniques.

First, we created two separate surveys, taking responses from over 1000 individuals at Arizona State University. These surveys focused on building trust in nonprofits, preferred marketing strategies as a consumer, and general awareness for various social issues that affect local and national nonprofits. Second, we conducted professional interviews with marketing leaders at nonprofits. These ranged from smaller, local nonprofits to nonprofits that operate on a national level. Their missions were all geared toward different causes, meaning they offered a diverse set of skills and advice on nonprofit marketing.

After obtaining this data, we created a guide for nonprofit marketing. Because there is a lack of information available on building marketing techniques in the nonprofit sector, we aimed to create a general guideline that could be applied to a variety of nonprofits and develop their marketing strategy. This includes details on how to create an executive summary, conduct a SWOT analysis, and the different strategies a nonprofit organization should implement.

Further, to test this marketing plan, we partnered with a local nonprofit in Arizona, Million Dollar Teacher Project. Million Dollar Teacher Project is a relatively new nonprofit, and focuses on educational inequality in Arizona. After looking over all our research and the nonprofit marketing guide, we were able to develop a plan for increasing engagement, awareness, and trust for Million Dollar Teacher Project. We pinpointed areas of improvement, such as social media, ambassador programs, email marketing, and follow up strategy.

The nonprofit marketing plan, our survey results, interview transcripts, as well as our marketing plan for Million Dollar Teacher Project can be found below.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Everyday Functioning in Individuals with Psychotic-like Experiences: Information Gleaned from Friends and Family

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Psychotic-Like Experiences (PLEs) are prevalent in the general population and may be a marker of risk for psychosis, yet little is known about the everyday functioning of individuals with PLEs. The purpose of this study was to compare everyday functioning

Psychotic-Like Experiences (PLEs) are prevalent in the general population and may be a marker of risk for psychosis, yet little is known about the everyday functioning of individuals with PLEs. The purpose of this study was to compare everyday functioning of people with and without PLEs. Participants were 108 college students enrolled in an introductory psychology course who were selected for participation in the study because they scored in the top and bottom 10% of a screening test for PLEs. Informants were emailed questionnaires and asked to report on the participants' functioning in three domains: interpersonal functioning, disorganized behavior, and cognitive-perceptual functioning. Informants also reported on participants' attention and memory problems. Results showed that, consistent with prior research, individuals high in PLEs were from lower SES families and reported more depression, anxiety, and substance use. Moreover, informants for participants high in PLEs reported more unusual/disorganized behavior than informants for participants low in PLEs. No differences were observed between individuals high versus low in PLEs for informant-reported interpersonal functioning and attention and memory problems, however. Findings suggest that noticeable difficulties among individuals with PLEs are limited to disorganized behavior. More research is needed to determine the functional consequences of disorganized behavior among individuals with PLEs.

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Agent

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Date Created
2016-05

Brands, Customers, & Rebranding Efforts: Why People React Negatively to Updates in Logo Design

Description

This paper looks at how an update to a brand’s logo can affect consumers. Specifically, how a brand’s logo redesign affects how consumers react to the updated logo itself and how consumers perceive the brand. When companies update their logo,

This paper looks at how an update to a brand’s logo can affect consumers. Specifically, how a brand’s logo redesign affects how consumers react to the updated logo itself and how consumers perceive the brand. When companies update their logo, there are a variety of ways in which a consumer might respond, including positively, negatively, or they might feel indifferent about the update. This project focuses on when consumers react negatively to changes in a brand’s identity, mainly the logo. Through secondary research on brand equity, loyalty, and consumer identity, followed with the primary research of a qualitative survey and interview, recommendations were formed in the hopes of guiding brands as they undergo a logo redesign. The qualitative survey looked at how the magnitude of the logo design change and the level of consumer involvement from the brand affected the consumer. Utilizing the brand Adidas, the logo was manipulated to reflect a minor change in design and a significant change in design. Furthermore, respondents were given three scenarios of involvement with either the minor or significant changed logo: involved by asking for their input, given a reason for the redesign, or neither involved nor given a reason. Overall, regardless of the level of involvement from the brand, consumers respond more positively when the change in logo design is minor. Specifically, consumers respond the most positive when they are involved in the redesign process while the change is minor. This research demonstrates that brands may see more positivity from consumers if they make evolutionary changes to their logo. Likewise, brands should recognize how significant a change in logo design is for the brand, and make sure to take their customers thoughts and feelings into consideration. The final components of this paper include an analysis of the research findings and an interpretation of those findings, along with any limitations experienced during this research, a variety of lessons learned from conducting this research, and overall recommendations for brands and for future research directions.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05