The Doctor of Nursing Practice Final Projects collection contains the completed works of students from the DNP Program at Arizona State University's College of Nursing and Health Innovation. These projects are the culminating product of the curricula and demonstrate clinical scholarship.

Collaborating Institutions:
College of Nursing and Health Innovation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 205
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Utilizing Education to Combat Compassion Gatigue in and Outpatient Psychiatric Setting

Description

Aim: To determine the change in provider’s compassion fatigue after implementing an education-based intervention in behavioral health.

Materials and Methods: A four-part education-based intervention for compassion fatigue was implemented over

Aim: To determine the change in provider’s compassion fatigue after implementing an education-based intervention in behavioral health.

Materials and Methods: A four-part education-based intervention for compassion fatigue was implemented over the course of 16 weeks. The Professional Quality of Life instrument was used to measure compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction.

Results: Although not statistically significant, mean compassion fatigue scores decreased in the sample.

Conclusion: Based on these results, further exploration into the causative factors of compassion fatigue in behavioral health are recommended.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-04-29

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Education for Parents to Effectively Reduce Cyberbullying and Cyber-Vicimization

Description

Background: Cyberbullying and cyber-victimization are rising problems and are associated with increased risk for mental health problems in children. Methods for addressing cyberbullying are limited, however, interventions focused on promoting

Background: Cyberbullying and cyber-victimization are rising problems and are associated with increased risk for mental health problems in children. Methods for addressing cyberbullying are limited, however, interventions focused on promoting appropriate parental mediation strategies are a promising solution supported by evidence and by guided by the Theory of Parenting Styles.

Objective: To provide an educational session to parents of middle school students that promotes effective methods of preventing and addressing cyberbullying incidents. Design: The educational sessions were provided to eight parents middle school student. Surveys to assess parent perception of and planned response to cyberbullying incidents and Parent Adolescent Communication Scale (PACS) scores were collected pre-presentation, post-presentation, and at one-month follow up.

Results: Data analysis of pre- and post-presentation PACS using a Wilcoxon test found no significant difference (Z = -.405, p >.05). There was not enough response to the 1-month follow-up to perform a data analysis on follow-up data.

Conclusions: Due to low attendance and participation in the follow-up survey the results of this project are limited. However, parents did appear to benefit from communicating concerns about cyberbullying with school officials. Future studies should examine if a school-wide anti-cyberbullying program that actively involves parents effects parental response to cyberbullying.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-04-30

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A Depression Care Management Intervention for Home Health Nurses

Description

Purpose: To examine the implementation of a web-based depression care management training program to increase home health nurses’ knowledge and attitudes regarding depression.

Background and Significance: The Centers for Disease Control

Purpose: To examine the implementation of a web-based depression care management training program to increase home health nurses’ knowledge and attitudes regarding depression.

Background and Significance: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2015 that the incidence of major depression in elderly receiving home health service rose to 13.5% compared to less than 5% with those not receiving care in the community.

Materials and Methods: An intervention program was offered to a convenience sample of home health nurses caring for elderly in the community. The Depression CARE for Patients AT Home (depression CAREPATH), which is an evidenced-based online training program consisting of didactic resources about depression screening and depression care management and e-learning modules. Participants were given a pre and post survey to assess their knowledge of the material. Additionally demographic information was obtained via self-report.

Results: A total of 8 out of 18 home health nurses participated in the study. All were females; 13% Caucasian and 88% were Asian. There’s an average of 37 years old (SD 14.7, range 23-58) and had 3 years of experience (SD 2.07, range <1-6). The mean depression CAREPATH knowledge total pre-test score was 15 (SD 1.85, range 13-18), while the mean total post-test score was 18.13 (SD 0.99, range 17-19). There was a difference in the depression knowledge test scores at baseline. All the participants obtained a passing score for the post-test (80%). The mean R-DAQ total pre-test score was 71 (SD 13.37, range 53-71) and mean total post-test score was 68, (SD 3.48, range 62-70). The professional confidence in depression attitude indicated agreement post intervention, except with the feeling comfortable in working with physical illness
than mental illness (pre intervention 62.5%, post intervention 100%). Participants agreed that home health nurses are well placed and more confident in assisting patients with depression (pre Depression Care Management 3 3 intervention 75%, post intervention 100%). In addition, participants felt more confident in
assessing suicide risk post intervention in patient s presenting with depression. Based from Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test, there was a statistical difference, z = -2.536, p= .01, between the depression knowledge pre and post-test scores, which indicates that there is an increase in depression knowledge after the intervention. However, there was no significant difference, z = -.846, p = .397 between the depression attitude, which indicate that there is no change in depression attitude after the intervention.

Conclusion: For this sample depression knowledge was increased post intervention, however, increase in knowledge did not significantly alter the depression attitude. Further study in a larger more diverse sample is needed for this intervention.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-01

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Improving Therapeutic Communication in a Psychiatric Mental Health Clinic

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the benefits of therapeutic communication in a mental health clinic with an outcome to increase patient satisfaction of their care and

Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the benefits of therapeutic communication in a mental health clinic with an outcome to increase patient satisfaction of their care and improve patient-caregiver communication and relationship.

Background: The consequences of poor communication or non-therapeutic communication cannot be overemphasized; these can include non-adherence to treatment plan, reduced treatment compliance, higher psychological morbidity, dissatisfaction with care and poor patient-caregiver relationship. Patients’ perception of how they are being treated affects how they respond to treatment plans and medication regimens

Method: The project consisted of providing education on the principles of therapeutic communication to healthcare workers in an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Follow up materials on therapeutic communication principles were provided on a weekly basis for one month. A pre-survey questionnaire was given to patients before intervention and a post-survey questionnaire after intervention to determine patient satisfaction with care and degree of communication with healthcare workers. The Short Assessment of Patient Satisfaction (SAPS) and the Communication Assessment Tool-Team (CAT-T) were the instruments utilized in this project.

Finding: Patient satisfaction and communication with staff were statistically and significantly improved after education on therapeutic communication was given to staff.

Conclusion: Education on therapeutic communication is an effective intervention tool in improving patient’s satisfaction and communication with staff and health care team members in a psychiatric outpatient clinic.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-01

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Using a Clinical Guideline Coupled with Education to Improve Healthcare Providers' Knowledge of Early Sepsis Recognition in the Post-Acute Care Setting: A Quality Improvement Project

Description

Aims: The goals of this project were (1) develop a sepsis clinical guideline, (2) enhance direct patient care staff knowledge of sepsis and (3) survey staff comfort level with identifying

Aims: The goals of this project were (1) develop a sepsis clinical guideline, (2) enhance direct patient care staff knowledge of sepsis and (3) survey staff comfort level with identifying sepsis post intervention.

Background: Sepsis remains a significant healthcare problem associated with high treatment costs and high mortality rates. Older adults are at an increased risk for developing sepsis, especially when age is combined with any type of compromising factor, such as chronic illness, recent hospitalizations, wounds, or invasive devices. Current evidence demonstrates that sepsis screening is effective for early identification of sepsis. Early identification of sepsis improves time to treatment initiation, which improves outcomes.

Methods: An evidence-based, provider approved clinical guideline was developed for a post-acute care facility after an extensive review of the literature. Upon implementation, brief educational sessions were provided to direct patient care staff. Participants completed pre- and post-tests as well as a demographic survey. A satisfaction survey was administered 30 days post intervention. A paired samples t-test was used to analyze the difference in test scores. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze the relationship between staff comfort levels and the clinical guideline.

Results: The samples included 25 participants in the educational intervention and 18 in the satisfaction survey. There was a significant difference in the scores between pre-test (M = 72.3, SD = 12.43) and post-test scores (M = 86.6, SD = 10.2); t(24) = -5.578, p < 0.001. There was a significant correlation between staff who felt comfortable in identifying sepsis with ease of screening (r = .831, p < .01) and high comfort levels with the policy (r = .889, p < .01).

Conclusion: Utilizing a clinical guideline, coupled with education, improves staff knowledge and comfort identifying sepsis in the post-acute care setting, which may improve early recognition and treatment initiation. This outcome is clinically significant as patients in this setting represent a vulnerable population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-04-29

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Supporting Advanced Practice Provider Transition to Practice: A Theoretical and Evidence-Based Intervention

Description

New graduate nurse practitioners and physician assistants, also known as advanced practice providers (APPs), face a significant number of challenges when entering professional practice. If the new graduate does not

New graduate nurse practitioners and physician assistants, also known as advanced practice providers (APPs), face a significant number of challenges when entering professional practice. If the new graduate does not receive sufficient guidance and support during this transition to practice (TTP), they will likely experience significant psychological stress and anxiety. If an organization does not implement measures to address TTP, the new graduate is much more likely to leave the current position within the first two years of practice. An extensive literature review was conducted investigating the effects, and necessary components of an orientation program which supports the new graduate through TTP. Using Van Maanen & Schein’s (1979) Theory of Organizational Socialization, a comprehensive new graduate orientation program was designed and implemented in large multi-specialty practice. Initial results suggest that this program improves both the perceived organizational support felt by the new graduate, as well as the new graduates’ affective commitment to the organization. Improvements in both these dimensions have been shown to decrease turnover intention and increase retention of the employee.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-04-29

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Impact of an Electronic Clinical Decision Support Tool on Early Maternal Glucose Screening in Pregnancy

Description

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of
pregnancy that is not clearly overt diabetes, has become more common as the rates of obesity in

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of
pregnancy that is not clearly overt diabetes, has become more common as the rates of obesity in women of childbearing age have increased. Undiagnosed, uncontrolled diabetes in pregnancy can lead to maternal and infant health comorbidities as well as have adverse long-term effects for mother or baby. Although routine screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs between 24 and 28 weeks gestation, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends screening earlier in pregnancy for women at risk for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Risk factors include previous history of GDM, known impaired glucose metabolism, or obesity (BMI > 30). The purpose of this project is to implement the clinical practice guideline for early maternal glucose screening during pregnancy in women with risk factors through the integration of a clinical decision support (CDS) tool in an electronic health record (EHR). CDS tools can be utilized as a point of care strategy to remind providers of the clinical practice guidelines and to assist providers in decision-making related to screening. Participating providers (n=18) utilized the CDS tool during the initial obstetrical visit for at risk women without a prepregnancy diabetes diagnosis and entering prenatal care prior to 24 weeks. The impact of
implantation of the CDS tool shows that an increase in screening was statistically significant (p<.001).

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-01

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Education for the Prevention of Diabetes

Description

Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of paired education involving both diet and activity recommendations have shown significant reductions in the advancement of adult (age 18 to 80) prediabetes to

Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of paired education involving both diet and activity recommendations have shown significant reductions in the advancement of adult (age 18 to 80) prediabetes to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Paired education on diet and activity has been effective for persons from diverse races, ethnicities, and levels of education. For this project, the paired education focused on the dietary guidance of the Whole 30 plan and the current exercise/activity recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The ADA recommends 30 min 5 x week or 60 min 3 x week of exercise, with no more than 48 hours between exercise occurrences. Ten adults with HbA1C between 5.7%-6.4%, levels specified by the ADA as prediabetes, were invited to participate in the project at an outpatient wellness practice. Participants took a pretest on basic food and activity knowledge, received educational sessions on the Whole 30™ plan and activity recommendations from the ADA, then completed a posttest. Participants were scheduled for one month follow ups. At the 3 month follow up appointment, repeat HbA1C was drawn. Most of the patients (7/10) completed return appointments at the 3-month time frame. Statistically significant results were seen in diet and exercise knowledge using a paired T-test. Clinically significant reductions were seen in HbA1C averages as well as weight, BMI, and glucose levels.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-04-30

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Recruiting Rural Nurses to Become Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in Rural Colorado

Description

Rural healthcare leaders are increasingly tasked with the responsibility of providing health access to 21% of the national population with only 10% of the provider workforce (Sonenberg, Knepper, & Pulcini,

Rural healthcare leaders are increasingly tasked with the responsibility of providing health access to 21% of the national population with only 10% of the provider workforce (Sonenberg, Knepper, & Pulcini, 2015). Provider recruitment strategies offering loan repayment have had some success in the short term, but are less impactful at creating a long-term retention rate, unless the providers have an existing connection to either the community in which they are working or rural healthcare (Renner et al., 2010). Responding to this data, a demonstration project has been created in Colorado to test a rural focused “grow your own” advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) model. This model is designed to recruit RNs from inside rural communities to return to school and become primary care providers within those communities upon graduation. The project offers stipend support with assistance in the school application process, educational support, clinical and job placement assistance, and monthly coaching. Additionally, communities are asked to provide matching funds to support the APRN students with a goal of creating a self-sustaining model that will build a continuous pipeline of APRN providers. This strategy avoids the costly need to recruit and relocate providers who have no ties to the community. The initial response from rural nurses and communities around the state has been overwhelmingly successful. This success suggests that this model could serve as a new and sustainable strategy for building a rural APRN provider workforce pipeline while ensuring access to a primary care health provider for all people living in rural areas.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-01

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Evidence-Based Algorithm to Prevent the Misdiagnosis of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Preschoolers

Description

There is an increased risk of misdiagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
in preschoolers due to the lack of validated diagnostic tools and provider knowledge of normal behavior and

There is an increased risk of misdiagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
in preschoolers due to the lack of validated diagnostic tools and provider knowledge of normal behavior and development. The goal of this project was to standardize the diagnostic process by adopting an evidence-based ADHD algorithm protocol for preschoolers (3-5 years). In an urban military pediatric clinic, five pediatric care clinicians were provided with an educational ADHD algorithm. Pre/posttest surveys were used to assess provider knowledge and perceptions of care. Chart audits determined preschooler ADHD diagnosis prevalence pre- and post-implementation of the algorithm. The rate of ADHD diagnosis in preschoolers reduced significantly from 78.6% pre-audit to 22.6% post-audit. In addition, providers improved their accuracy in diagnosing alternative disorders and behaviors that mimic the symptomology of ADHD (Z=-2.0, p=0.046). The rate of misdiagnosis of ADHD in preschoolers decreased because of the use of an evidence-based ADHD algorithm.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-01