The Center for Negative Carbon Emissions is advancing technologies and developing best practices in carbon management. This growing collection includes reports, peer-reviewed articles, and presentations authored by Center-affiliated faculty and students on the various facets of carbon management.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
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Description

We analyze current approaches to carbon accounting for removed carbon sold on carbon markets, focusing on carbon crediting under the framing of a remaining carbon budget, the issue of durability, and approaches to accounting methodologies. We explore the topic of mixing carbon with other problems in developing carbon accounting methodologies

We analyze current approaches to carbon accounting for removed carbon sold on carbon markets, focusing on carbon crediting under the framing of a remaining carbon budget, the issue of durability, and approaches to accounting methodologies. We explore the topic of mixing carbon with other problems in developing carbon accounting methodologies and highlight the open policy questions. We conclude with a suggested framework for accounting for carbon removal accounting that simplifies climate action and enables a world with negative carbon emissions.

ContributorsArcusa, Stéphanie (Author) / Lackner, Klaus (Author) / Page, Robert (Author) / Sriramprasad, Vishrudh (Author) / Hagood, Emily (Author) / Center for Negative Carbon Emissions (Contributor)
Created2022-11-01
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Description

A brief describing how certificates of carbon sequestration ought to work, their meaning, and their requirements.

ContributorsArcusa, Stéphanie (Author) / Lackner, Klaus S (Author)
Created2021
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Description

Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) is essential to meet the Paris Agreement’s commitment to stay below a 1.5 degrees Celsius average temperature increase. To provide critical foundational support to the development, deployment, and scaling of CDR, certification of carbon removal is needed. The international community is developing rules for the functioning

Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) is essential to meet the Paris Agreement’s commitment to stay below a 1.5 degrees Celsius average temperature increase. To provide critical foundational support to the development, deployment, and scaling of CDR, certification of carbon removal is needed. The international community is developing rules for the functioning of carbon markets. To support that process, we explored open questions on four key themes in the development of standards and certification of carbon removal through an international multi-stakeholder consultation process hosted by the Global Carbon Removal Partnership, Arizona State University, and Conservation International. Categories of stakeholders included standard developing organizations, non-governmental organizations, governments, and academics. Discussions covered 1. the treatment of emission reduction, avoidance,and removal in certification, 2. the role of additionality in carbon removal, 3. the choice of certification instrument for carbon removal, and 4. the treatment of durability in certification. They revealed fundamental differences in viewpoints on how certification should work. We highlight areas of further exploration, concluding that providing transparency on assumptions made at the certification level will be crucial to progress and, eventually, the acceptance and success of carbon removal as a climate solution.

ContributorsArcusa, Stéphanie (Author) / Sprenkle-Hyppolite, Starry (Author) / Agrawal, Aditya (Author)
Created2022-11-09
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Description

An exploration of the potential for a digital twin for direct air capture: background, classification, and integration.

Created2023-01-01
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Description

Workshop report of general outcomes from stakeholder discussions regarding the planning of the decarbonization of the state of Arizona as part of a regional effort.

Created2021-09
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Description

Workshop report on socio-economic and technical discussions Direct Air Capture as a technology for the climate transition.

Created2022-01-19
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Description

This document details a conceptual Framework for the Certification of Carbon Sequestration (FCCS). It is based on a system designed to support negative emissions. It provides the minimum requirements for the development of carbon sequestration standards and certificates of carbon sequestration. It allows the certification of standards so that they

This document details a conceptual Framework for the Certification of Carbon Sequestration (FCCS). It is based on a system designed to support negative emissions. It provides the minimum requirements for the development of carbon sequestration standards and certificates of carbon sequestration. It allows the certification of standards so that they in turn produce certification of removed carbon that authenticates durability and verifiability. The framework (i) identifies an organizational structure for the certification system, (ii) clarifies the responsibility of participating entities, (iii) provides certificate designs and usages, (iv) details the requirements to develop measurement protocols, (v) provides mechanisms to support a long-term industry, and (vi) outlines a vision towards durable storage.

ContributorsArcusa, Stéphanie (Author) / Lackner, Klaus (Author) / Hagood, Emily (Author) / Page, Robert (Author) / Sriramprasad, Vishrudh (Author)
Created2022-12-05